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  Vines and the Coriolis Effect
From: jimjim at sky.net (James W. Waddick) on 1996.12.27 at 19:53:50(6)
Dear Don;
Is there a term for "Urban Legend" applied to a world-wide Legend.
If the whirlpools go the other way 'down under', the vines must twine the
other way, too. DUH!
There probably ARE alligators in the sewers of Sydney however.

Jim W.

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From: grsjr at juno.com (George R Stilwell, Jr.) on 1996.12.27 at 19:56:35(7)
Don,

It's well known that Wisteria sinensis (Chinese) twines in the opposite
direction of Wisteria floribunda (Japanese). Since both are native to the
northern hemisphere, there's at least one exception to the theory that
coriolis effects vine twining direction. I think the guy you quoted must
have been holding a glass in his curled fingers.

Ray

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From: Endangered Species <especies at ix.netcom.com> on 1996.12.27 at 20:02:05(9)
At 08:23 AM 12/27/96 -0600, Don Burns wrote:
>Aroiders,
>Not on the subject of Aroids but certainly of interest to those who play
>with Philodendron and Syngonium, the following interchange is a direct
>quote from a bionet group last week:
>
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From: Don Martinson <dmartin at cdmas.crc.fmlh.edu> on 1996.12.27 at 20:04:51(10)
While not wishing to extend this rather non-aroid thread too far, I'd
like to add my .02 worth.

We should already suspect there would be no effect on vining plants
since those of who grow wisteria know that of the 2 most commonly seen
species, W. sinensis twines from left to right, while W. florabunda
twines from right to left.

I'm not sure that I would trust the "drain effect" on determining
whether you reside in the Northern or Southern Hemisphere (assuming you
don't already know!). The Coriolis Forces are too weak to reliably work
in such a small venue (At least this is what all of my physics teachers
told me.).

Finally, for a more humorous look at differing vining habits, I would
refer you to one of the old songs of British humorists, Michael Flanders
and Donald Swann called "The Honeysuckle and the Bindweed", regarding an
ill-fated love affair between the right-handed honeysuckle and the
left-handed bindweed
--
Don Martinson

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From: Endangered Species <especies at ix.netcom.com> on 1996.12.27 at 21:42:25(13)
At 09:53 PM 12/27/96 -0600, James W. Waddick wrote:
>Dear Don;
> Is there a term for "Urban Legend" applied to a world-wide Legend.
>If the whirlpools go the other way 'down under', the vines must twine the
>other way, too. DUH!
> There probably ARE alligators in the sewers of Sydney however.
>
> Jim W.
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From: "David G. Bauman" <DBAUMAN at mail.indyzoo.com> on 1996.12.28 at 11:49:41(15)
It's my understanding that most species have a characteristic
phyllotaxy. Would we expect then that a given species planted
"north" and "south" would exhibit this in equal magnitude but
opposite direction? It would surprise me, but then I've been
surprised more than once in my life and the natural world IS the
place to find surprises :)

[phyllotaxy refers to the natural "spiral" or "twist" in a plant.
Start at a leaf and count the number of spirals made until a leaf is
found directly above and in line with the first and then divide by
the total number of leaves passed.]

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From: Rand Nicholson <writserv at nbnet.nb.ca> on 1996.12.28 at 14:40:54(16)
>It's my understanding that most species have a characteristic
>phyllotaxy. Would we expect then that a given species planted
>"north" and "south" would exhibit this in equal magnitude but
>opposite direction? It would surprise me, but then I've been
>surprised more than once in my life and the natural world IS the
>place to find surprises :)
>
>[phyllotaxy refers to the natural "spiral" or "twist" in a plant.
>Start at a leaf and count the number of spirals made until a leaf is
>found directly above and in line with the first and then divide by
>the total number of leaves passed.]
>
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From: BIHOREL at cris.com (Christian Feuillet) on 1996.12.28 at 14:53:13(17)
>Dear Don;
> Is there a term for "Urban Legend" applied to a world-wide Legend.
>If the whirlpools go the other way 'down under', the vines must twine the
>other way, too. DUH!
> There probably ARE alligators in the sewers of Sydney however.
>
> Jim W.
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From: "Bill Plummer" <remmulp at servtech.com> on 1996.12.28 at 15:58:52(18)
IF this is a real effect, could it be the growing tip is following the sun
around ?

----------

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From: Endangered Species <especies at ix.netcom.com> on 1996.12.28 at 17:50:50(19)
At 05:58 PM 12/28/96 -0600, you wrote:
>IF this is a real effect, could it be the growing tip is following the sun
>around ?
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From: Tim McNinch <newton at cin.net> on 1996.12.29 at 12:05:40(23)
To skeptics:

Yet another question which is getting entirely off subject, will our
family dog, Halley (after the comet), who rotates clockwise once or
twice before she lies down (an old innate habit of chasing snakes away
from the immediate area prior to sleep) turn counter-clockwise to do
this in the southern hemisphere?

How does phototropism get along with this Coryollis effect? And we all
know that plants growing in the southern hemisphere are essentially
growing up-side-down, so does geotropism come into play? How far does a
plant need to be from the equator to be allowed to turn the other cheek?

Losing sleep over these issues...

I remain,

Tim

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