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  Fenestrated aroids
From: "Wallace Wells" <wwells at haven.ios.com> on 1997.01.10 at 11:05:43(102)
I have owned Monstera deliciosa and recently got M. pitterii. I am
interested in other fenestrated or 'holed-leaved' aroids and would
like comment from others who are cultivating the same. I know there
are Philodendrons with this characteristic.

WWells,
NYC NY

From: Eduardo Gomes Goncalves <eggon at guarany.cpd.unb.br> on 1997.01.10 at 13:45:37(104)
On Fri, 10 Jan 1997, Wallace Wells wrote:

> I have owned Monstera deliciosa and recently got M. pitterii. I am
> interested in other fenestrated or 'holed-leaved' aroids and would
> like comment from others who are cultivating the same. I know there
> are Philodendrons with this characteristic.

The only genera of Araceae that I'm aware about the presence of
fenestrations are: Monstera (as you already know), Dracontioides (a water
dweller from Brazil), Raphidophora, Epipremnum and maybe some Anchomanes.
I have never seen a fenestrated Philodendron and I think they don't exist
at all. Some pictorial books of horticulture (e.g. Exotica) usually show a
young Monstera deliciosa identificated as "Philodendron pertusum" and I
think it can confuse a lot of people.

Best wishes,

Eduardo

From: "Richard Mansell (BIO)" <mansell at chuma.cas.usf.edu> on 1997.01.12 at 12:22:04(109)
Might we also add Dracontium to the list of fenestrated aroids?

Dick

On Fri, 10

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From: "Peter Boyce" <P.Boyce at lion.rbgkew.org.uk> on 1997.01.13 at 07:27:36(113)
I can add a couple to Eduardo's list

Amydrium medium and Amydrium hainanense. The latter has perhaps THE
most-perforated leaf in the Araceae, a three-quarter x half-metre
brilliant-green net of tissue. Quite, quite beautiful.

Pete

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From: "Dr. Guanghua Zhu" <gzhu at lehmann.mobot.org> on 1997.01.13 at 07:36:44(116)
Yes, Dick, we definitely should include Dracontium. As a matter of
fact, D. plowmanii, is sometimes very heavily fenestrated.
Fenestrations are not uncommon in a few other species.

Guanghua

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From: Endangered Species Nursery <nursery at endangeredspecies.com> on 1997.01.13 at 14:05:00(119)
Is not Cryptocoryne an aroid? There's one which practically defines
fenestration. It used to be called 'fenestralis' when I was a child.
Hermine

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From: "Neal R. Foster" <nealfost at umich.edu> on 1997.01.14 at 07:19:05(121)
Hermine, you're thinking of the Madagascar Lace Leaf Plant, Apotamogeton
(spelling?) fenestralis, which Albert Greenberg of Everglades Aquatic
Nurseries in Tampa used to sell to aquarists back in the 1950's and
1960's. Albert contracted river blindness (or some other tropical
parasite or disease that causes blindness) while collecting aquatic plants
in Madagascar. This is not an aroid, but I don't know what plant family
it does belong to.

Neal R. Foster, U.S. Department of Interior, USGS-Biological Resources
Division, Great Lakes Science Center, 1451 Green Road, Ann Arbor, Michigan
48105-2807; Phone [+voicemail]: (313)994-3331-x264; FAX: (313)994-8780;
e-mail: nealfost@umich.edu

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From: tychen at ippfwhr.org on 1997.01.14 at 07:24:02(122)
i think you are thinking of "Aponogeton fenestralis" (from Madagascar)
which is not a Cryptocoryne, therefore not an aroid, although it is
also an aquatic plant you can find in fish stores.

tsuh yang chen, new york city

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From: Hermine Stover <hermine at endangeredspecies.com> on 1997.01.14 at 07:28:58(123)
At 05:32 PM 1/13/97 -0500, tychen@ippfwhr.org wrote:
> i think you are thinking of "Aponogeton fenestralis" (from Madagascar)
> which is not a Cryptocoryne, therefore not an aroid, although it is
> also an aquatic plant you can find in fish stores.
>
> tsuh yang chen, new york city
>
>
>
_absolutely thank you. It was forever ago.
hermine

From: Hermine Stover <hermine at endangeredspecies.com> on 1997.01.14 at 16:10:49(131)
At 09:19 AM 1/14/97 -0600, you wrote:
>Hermine, you're thinking of the Madagascar Lace Leaf Plant, Apotamogeton
>(spelling?) fenestralis, which Albert Greenberg of Everglades Aquatic
>Nurseries in Tampa used to sell to aquarists back in the 1950's and
>1960's. Albert contracted river blindness (or some other tropical
>parasite or disease that causes blindness) while collecting aquatic plants
>in Madagascar. This is not an aroid, but I don't know what plant family
>it does belong to.
>
>Neal R. Foster, U.S. Department of Interior, USGS-Biological Resources
>Division, Great Lakes Science Center, 1451 Green Road, Ann Arbor, Michigan
>48105-2807; Phone [+voicemail]: (313)994-3331-x264; FAX: (313)994-8780;
>e-mail: nealfost@umich.edu
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From: BIHOREL at cris.com (Christian Feuillet) on 1997.01.14 at 19:29:01(133)
>Hermine, you're thinking of the Madagascar Lace Leaf Plant, Apotamogeton
>(spelling?) fenestralis, which Albert Greenberg of Everglades Aquatic
>Nurseries in Tampa used to sell to aquarists back in the 1950's and
>1960's.

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