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  Hydrogen Peroxide
From: "D. Christopher Rogers" <crogers at ecoanalysts.com> on 2007.01.31 at 09:52:58(15188)
Hiyer!

I have learned lots about using the cinnamon, thank you all that replied.
But I have a related question now: an orchid grower that I met uses hydrogen
peroxide on the roots/potting media to kill fungal and bacterial infections
when they appear. He says it always works well on his orchids, and they
revive quite quickly after one or two treatments, rarely ever needing to be
treated again.

Anyone ever do this with aroids? I can see using it on the epiphytes, but
what about terrestrials?

Happy days,
Christopher

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From: "michael mahan" <agavestar at covad.net> on 2007.02.01 at 13:23:01(15192)
I've heard of that being used on blubs, tubers,fleshy African succulents
(underground types & the above ground desert types ), & water bearing
drought type trees, but only after it's rotted & the rot has been cut out ,
washed, then used peroxide to clean the wound & then cinnamon applied, but
never have head of it used as a full pot wash .. willing to try !

Michael mahan

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From: ronmchatton at aol.com on 2007.02.01 at 15:56:35(15199)
This is a common use for peroxide in many, many potted plant crops. In its most expensive form its marketed under the trade name Zerotol but its simply 35% hydrogen peroxide with some proprietary stabilizing agents. It works if you keep up with it as there is no residual activity.

Ron McHatton

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From: Steve Marak <samarak at gizmoworks.com> on 2007.02.02 at 09:00:34(15200)
On Thu, 1 Feb 2007 ronmchatton@aol.com wrote:

> This is a common use for peroxide in many, many potted plant crops. In its
> most expensive form its marketed under the trade name Zerotol but its simply
> 35% hydrogen peroxide with some proprietary stabilizing agents. It works if
> you keep up with it as there is no residual activity.
>
> Ron McHatton
> Zone 9B, Central Florida
>

35% !? Wow. I assume it is diluted before use?

At that concentration (the disinfectant/bleach solutions in stores
are typically about 3%, I think) hydrogen peroxide is a very strong oxidizer
which can damage skin, clothing, etc., and especially eyes.

-- Steve Marak

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From: "D. Christopher Rogers" <crogers at ecoanalysts.com> on 2007.02.02 at 09:05:02(15201)
Thank you
to all who replied to me!

I have now
treated my Ulearum donburnsii with it, and I hope and pray that I can save it.
It is rotting despite being kept dry and being placed right over the heater.
Sigh.

Christopher

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From: "Susan Cox" <snalice at dslextreme.com> on 2007.02.02 at 12:34:17(15206)
Steve, YES, I would think it will be diluted down for any use but perhaps
for something you want to disappear. The percentage for plant use has been
in some cases (on plant tissue) 3 percent and under peroxide mix. For the
purpose of fungus prevention it might be stronger, but someone else might
let you know a mix for that use. It's important for everyone to know that
35% peroxide is DANGEROUS at that concentrate. Someone correct me if I'm
wrong about this when it comes to fungus. If one is very particuilar about
what goes on their plants, there is a 'food' grade 35% peroxide available
also. Not sure it matters though.

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From: "Harry Witmore" <harrywitmore at witmore.net> on 2007.02.02 at 15:57:30(15208)
I grow Dischidia species and they have a tendency to rot. I have often
successfully stopped the rot in it's tracks using sulfur. It is often used
on potatoes to prevent rot.
?
Harry Witmore
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