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  Asian epiphytes
From: RAYMOMATTLA at cs.com on 2007.02.07 at 18:43:23(15250)
Does anyone know if there are any other genera in SE Asia other than Remusatia with species growing as TRUE epiphytes.
If so which species?
Thanks in advance,
Michael Mattlage
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From: Jonathan Ertelt <jonathan.ertelt at vanderbilt.edu> on 2007.02.08 at 08:40:11(15253)
Title: Re: [Aroid-l] Asian epiphytes

Michael,

Granted
it is an old reference, but still the first one I go to to check on
such things - Michael Madison's 1977 article in Slebyana II:1,
Vascular Epiphytes: Their Systematic Occurrence and Salient Features,
only lists Remusatia as being turly epiphytic, all other old world
genera are listed as hemiepiphytes. Yup, lots have been found since
then, but it's still a good starting point.

Jonathan

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From: "Peter Boyce" <botanist at malesiana.com> on 2007.02.08 at 14:22:12(15258)
Michael

Here in Sarawak Scindapsus crassipes,
S. geniculatus. S. beccarii and a couple of
yet-to-be-described spp. are obligate primary epiphytes; all form fans of
foliage that function as litter-traps. In S. geniculatus there is
extensive formation of short, erect, pointed roots into the accumulated litter
in the same manner as happens in many Anthurium.

Peter

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From: "Tom Croat" <Thomas.Croat at mobot.org> on 2007.02.08 at 17:12:30(15259)
Dear
Michael:

As I recall from my paper on the life forms of Araceae (Published in Aroideana)
Remusatia is the only one in Asia and it is not even regularly epiphytic.
Sometime you find genera which are not regularly epiphytic acting like epiphytes
when they germinate in a deposit of soil on a tree. I once found a Spathiphyllum
growing happily on a fallen tree.

Tom

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From: "Alistair Hay" <ajmhay at hotmail.com> on 2007.02.08 at 21:15:22(15260)
We need Peter Boyce on this one, but there is a Bornean Scindapsus which grows as an epiphytic leaf-trapping rosette. I can't lay hands on Peter's revision so I can't look up which species it is, and I am also not 100% sure whether this species starts life on the ground or not....

Michael,

Granted it is an old reference, but still the first one I go to to check on such things - Michael Madison's 1977 article in Slebyana II:1, Vascular Epiphytes: Their Systematic Occurrence and Salient Features, only lists Remusatia as being turly epiphytic, all other old world genera are listed as hemiepiphytes. Yup, lots have been found since then, but it's still a good starting point.

Jonathan

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From: "Alistair Hay" <ajmhay at hotmail.com> on 2007.02.08 at 21:43:08(15262)
Ah good! We were messaging simultaneously!!
Alistair

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From: Adam Black <epiphyte1 at earthlink.net> on 2007.02.08 at 22:04:36(15263)
How about an epiphytic Arisaema - A. menghaiense. See
http://flora.huh.harvard.edu/china/novon/novo-14-03-372.pdf

The description at this link is surprisingly vague as to its epiphytic
habit - does anyone know if it is exclusively epiphytic, or simply a
species that can be found growing in either situation as in Remusatia?

Are these in cultivation? If so, what do I need to do to get one?!?!

Adam Black

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From: Adam Black <epiphyte1 at earthlink.net> on 2007.02.08 at 22:11:10(15264)
Wow, I would love to see pictures of these unusual species of
Scindapsus if anyone has them. More to add to my wish list!

Adam Black

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From: "Peter Boyce" <botanist at malesiana.com> on 2007.02.09 at 02:46:12(15266)
Hi Adam

I have images of all and will post them on aroid-l
over the coming weekend; S. geniculatus is particularly nice since the
back of the leaves is chalky-grey.

Peter

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