IAS Aroid Quasi Forum

About Aroid-L
 This is a continuously updated archive of the Aroid-L mailing list in a forum format - not an actual Forum. If you want to post, you will still need to register for the Aroid-L mailing list and send your postings by e-mail for moderation in the normal way.

  watertrumpet
From: "Jan D. Bastmeijer" <crypts at bart.nl> on 2007.02.23 at 17:31:10(15333)
The aquatic genus Cryptocoryne has a nickname in English as "watertrumpet".
At the 2006 meeting of the European Cryptocoryne Society in Switserland,
Niels Jacobsen (Copenhagen, DK) demonstrated that you actually can play on
it. Very funny to see (and hear) the movie at:
http://users.bart.nl/~crypts/Botanical/watertrumpet.html

A question is from where the name "watertrumpet" originates. Is it the
typical tube and limb of a Cryptocoryne which resembles more or less a
trumpet or is there an indigenous root for this name? Anybody knows?

Enjoy it,

Jan Bastmeijer

+More
From: ted.held at us.henkel.com on 2007.02.27 at 06:36:50(15374)
Jan,

I am pretty sure the "trumpet"
part is simply descriptive of the shape of the inflorescence. It is similar
to Wendt describing Cryptocoryne as "chalice" (Kelch in German)
plants or chalice flowers.

It would not surprise me, however, that
someone where they are native might have discovered that one can produce
a sound through them. After all, I was once fond of making fine sounds
with blades of grass stretched between my thumbs. This non-obvious trick
enchants children even today. But I would imagine that any pet name for
Cryptocoryne derived from local child play would be in some other language
than English. Do you know what Cryptocoynes are called in the local languages
and how those names might be transcribed into one or another European language?
If the local name is some variant of "trumpet", that would be
the clue we need.

Otherwise, how did Niels learn to do
what he is doing? Here you have a primary source.

Ted.

+More
Note: this is a very old post, so no reply function is available.