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  Ambrosinia bassii
From: Rand Nicholson <writserv at nbnet.nb.ca> on 1997.09.20 at 12:24:30(1279)
Aroiders:

I have just received somer tubers of Ambrosinia bassi and can't seem to get
any cultural information on them. Any help, URLs, will be greatly
appreciated. A picture would also be nice.

Kind Regards,

Rand

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From: Dick <Dick at rmy.emory.edu> on 1997.09.22 at 08:03:46(1299)
Hi folks,

I just collected some fresh seed of Jack in the pulpit and I wondered
what the recommended treatment was.

Dick Wagner

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From: Fausto Ceni <cendot at spidernet.it> on 1997.09.23 at 09:19:31(1319)
Rand Nicholson wrote:
>
> Aroiders:
>
> I have just received somer tubers of Ambrosinia bassi and can't seem to get
> any cultural information on them. Any help, URLs, will be greatly
> appreciated. A picture would also be nice.
>

A. bassi is a lovely little aroid that grows in west mediterranean.
Leaves in october, inflorescence appearing from december to march and
during a month or more.
The spata is at soil level and indian-shoe like shaped (indians in
Asia!!): very unusual.
It is not rare but not easy to recognize in the wild.
Despite the ecology description on Deni Bown's book, I have found and
collect it at sea level in north Sardinia on flat terrain, on the border
of where the water stays when it rains, on terrain deriving from
siliceus rock, absolutely without limestone.
Cultivation not difficult: dry summer (I think it is not necessary the
"backing in the sun"), storage at 25-270C in shadow, but absolutely no
rain, water from september to April/May, when the leaves are beginng to
get yellow colour, exactly as many mediterranean winter growers. No idea
on hardyness, but I think no more as zone 8.
I will send you a picture.
Good luck.
Fausto

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From: "Carlo A. Balistrieri" <cabalist at facstaff.wisc.edu> on 1997.10.22 at 10:20:58(1462)
Yes, it's one of the little ones but I'm thrilled to report my first
flowering of Ambrosinia bassii. Its little elfin-slipper flowers are more
interesting inside than out with maroon spotting and are pressed to the
ground. They open just as the leaves are coming up and beginning to unfurl.

Anyone have suggestions for a list of the smallest aroids? I'd like to
compile one for Aroid-L (and my want list!).

Carlo

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From: Tom Croat <croat at mobot.org> on 1997.10.23 at 11:23:30(1474)
Carlo: Before you get too excited about Ambrosina basii I should say
that I have seen a fully developed Anthurium gracile (Rudge) Schott
which was no larger than my thumb nail (including its inflorescence).
This was no doubt a freak but it was real.
Tom
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From: eduardo gomes goncalves <eggon at guarany.cpd.unb.br> on 1997.10.23 at 16:23:07(1478)
On Wed, 22 Oct 1997, Carlo A. Balistrieri wrote:

> Anyone have suggestions for a list of the smallest aroids? I'd like to
> compile one for Aroid-L (and my want list!).
>
> Carlo

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From: "Julius Boos" <ju-bo at classic.msn.com> on 1997.10.24 at 06:44:44(1488)
----------
Sent: Thursday, October 23, 1997 7:23 PM
To: ju-bo@msn.com
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From: Rand Nicholson <writserv at nbnet.nb.ca> on 1997.12.04 at 15:09:06(1707)
All:

The bloom of my Ambrosinia bassii is finally starting to open and the
bloom, itself, is starting to colour down. "Brown," or shades of, is
inadequate to describe the outer spathe. With a magnifying glass and a
little more time, I will be able to clearly discern the interior features
of the spathe (this is more to my eyesight than to the need of a magnifying
glass, I think).

This tiny plant seems quite comfortable in Maritime Canada (New Brunswick),
in a coolish south-western window as long as it is misted regularly. The
sun, reflected from the snow, probably helps too. As a first time grower,
this turned out to be an easy plant (for me) and well worth the while for
those who like _small_.

Kind Regards,

Rand

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From: jbauer <"jbauer at concordnc.com" at concordnc.com> on 1997.12.04 at 20:19:01(1709)
Rand Nicholson wrote:
>
> All:
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From: frances howey <fhowey at julian.uwo.ca> on 1997.12.05 at 20:07:30(1713)
At 05:07 PM 12/4/97 -0600, you wrote:
>All:
>
>The bloom of my Ambrosinia bassii is finally starting to open and the
>bloom, itself, is starting to colour down. "Brown," or shades of, is
>inadequate to describe the outer spathe. With a magnifying glass and a
>little more time, I will be able to clearly discern the interior features
>of the spathe (this is more to my eyesight than to the need of a magnifying
>glass, I think).
>
>This tiny plant seems quite comfortable in Maritime Canada (New Brunswick),
>in a coolish south-western window as long as it is misted regularly. The
>sun, reflected from the snow, probably helps too. As a first time grower,
>this turned out to be an easy plant (for me) and well worth the while for
>those who like _small_.
>
>Kind Regards,
>
>Rand
>
>
>PS: Carlo - Just as you said: Fascinating and unique!
>
>PPS: Thanks again, Fausto!
>
>Rand Nicholson
>New Brunswick
>Maritime Canada, Z 5b
>
>
>Hi Rand: Did you start Ambrosinia bassii from seed or from a corm? And
were you able to purchase it from a Canadian nursery/seed house? I have a
collection of Biarum corms which came from Wisley Garden - they are planted
on a south facing windowsill and so far are just sending up leaves, although
one of them sent up a cute little maroon spathe and spadix in the open
garden last June. Several have been left outside, in a sheltered spot and
heavily mulched, just to see what happens. We usually get down to -28 but
this winter is supposed to be mild.

Fran Howey

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From: Fausto Ceni <cendot at spidernet.it> on 1997.12.06 at 14:51:58(1716)
frances howey wrote:
>
> At 05:07 PM 12/4/97 -0600, you wrote:
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