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  Thrips
From: eduardo gomes goncalves <eggon at guarany.cpd.unb.br> on 1997.09.26 at 19:50:18(1349)
Dear aroid people,

Some time ago I asked some help with the control of slugs that was
chewing my living collection. I have follow your tips and the monsters
are controlled. Now I have another enemy to fight. THRIPS!!! They are
under the leaves of a lot of plants (Arisarum, Zantedeschia, Urospatha,
Dracontioides, Gearum, Typhonodorum, etc) and causes golden spots in the
blade. Seriously attacked leaves can dry out completely. I checked the
horticultural links at the IAS home page and found out it could be the
Greenhouse Thrip (Heliothrips haemorroidalis), that grows in warm and
humid environment. Obviously, it can be another species (remember: I'm
living in a tropical country and there are insects everywhere!), but it
matches very well the description. They are said to occur only in
greenhouses there in the USA and Europe and mine aren't greenhouse
plants. Meanwhile, Brazil itself is a big greenhouse!
I'm completely stupid about pest control. What should I do?

Thanks in advance,

Eduardo.

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From: "Julius Boos" <ju-bo at classic.msn.com> on 1997.09.30 at 20:27:20(1359)
----------
Sent: Friday, September 26, 1997 10:50 PM
To: ju-bo@msn.com
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From: eduardo gomes goncalves <eggon at guarany.cpd.unb.br> on 1997.10.03 at 06:43:12(1377)
Dear Julius,

Yes, I'm sure about it. They are ugly thrips. The youngsters are
whitish and don't fly. The adults are dark brown and fly. I have seem
both stages and there is no doubt they are thrips. I tried soapy water
and didn't work (now they are just clean thrips). I tried a piretroid
insecticide to garden plants and they liked it. I think they are
insecticide-addicted! Now I think I have to try something stronger.
Obviously I'm also proceeding lots of hand picking but they are too small
(approx. 1mm long) and it is a boring work. Dynamite would work but I
think my plants wouldn't enjoy it. I will try some clues that people told me
and will tell all of you what happened.

Sincerely,

Eduardo.

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From: Krzysztof Kozminski <kk at netgate.net> on 1997.10.03 at 11:10:14(1380)
On Fri, 3 Oct 1997, eduardo gomes goncalves wrote:

> Yes, I'm sure about it. They are ugly thrips. The youngsters are
> whitish and don't fly. The adults are dark brown and fly. I have seem
> both stages and there is no doubt they are thrips. I tried soapy water
> and didn't work (now they are just clean thrips). I tried a piretroid
> insecticide to garden plants and they liked it. I think they are
> insecticide-addicted! Now I think I have to try something stronger.
> Obviously I'm also proceeding lots of hand picking but they are too small
> (approx. 1mm long) and it is a boring work. Dynamite would work but I
> think my plants wouldn't enjoy it. I will try some clues that people told me
> and will tell all of you what happened.

Have you tried spraying with one of the mild varieties of horticultural
oils? These are typically labeled 'ultra-fine' or some such and can be
used on living plants in leaf. These sprays work by suffocating the
sprayed critters, and will take out any insect whatsoever, scale included,
while at the same time being very benign on other life forms (although I
would not want to breathe in the mist). I tried it on big-leaved aroids:
Alocasias, Xanthosomas, and Remusatias with no ill effects. Recent
treatment of Spathicarpas (which have acquired scale) may be too recent to
tell (other than the scale is dead), since it happened 2 days ago). The
only problem is that the sprays work only on direct contact, and may need
to be repeated several times to take out anything that you missed or
whatever was buried in the soil at the application time.

KK

From: newton at cin.net on 1997.10.03 at 20:16:54(1382)
eduardo gomes goncalves wrote:
>
> Dear Julius,
>
> Yes, I'm sure about it. They are ugly thrips. The youngsters are
> whitish and don't fly. The adults are dark brown and fly. I have seem
> both stages and there is no doubt they are thrips. I tried soapy water
> and didn't work (now they are just clean thrips). I tried a piretroid
> insecticide to garden plants and they liked it. I think they are
> insecticide-addicted! Now I think I have to try something stronger.
> Obviously I'm also proceeding lots of hand picking but they are too small
> (approx. 1mm long) and it is a boring work. Dynamite would work but I
> think my plants wouldn't enjoy it. I will try some clues that people told me
> and will tell all of you what happened.
>
> Sincerely,
>
> Eduardo.
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From: Chris Marsden <Byway at compuserve.com> on 1997.10.04 at 21:59:31(1388)
Julius et. al,
> > Yes, I'm sure about it. They are ugly thrips. The youngsters are
> > whitish and don't fly. The adults are dark brown and fly. I have seem=

> > both stages and there is no doubt they are thrips. I tried soapy wate=
r
> > and didn't work (now they are just clean thrips). I tried a piretroid=

> > insecticide to garden plants and they liked it. I think they are
> > insecticide-addicted! Now I think I have to try something stronger.
> > Obviously I'm also proceeding lots of hand picking but they are too
small
> > (approx. 1mm long) and it is a boring work. Dynamite would work but I=

> > think my plants wouldn't enjoy it. I will try some clues that people
told me
> > and will tell all of you what happened.

> A sense of humor is paramount to success.

Au contrare. I'd go with the Trinitrotoluene (TNT). =

On a (slightly) more serious note, now that you have clean thrips, go for=

the jet-wash. We are talking about serious cleanliness here.

Try putting the whole plant in (_rain_) water for a day, 2 days, 3 days,
heck... go for a week if necessary. The thrips will drown (ideally spray
them with some soapy water first - there may still be some specks of dirt=

there). IME the plant doesn't mind it as long as you don't make the
container into permanent living quarters. Oh... and don't forget to
completely cover it with water. Otherwise you will have Robinson Crusoe
thrips. (Or should that be _clean_ Robinson Crusoe thrips?)

Kindest Regards,

Toby Marsden

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