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  Help with Anthurium ID
From: exotics at hawaii.rr.com (Windy Aubrey) on 2007.11.11 at 16:24:53(16692)

Hi Skip,

I also picked up the same plant last year as Cupulispathum.
Earlier that year I had gone to the Huntington Library and photographed their specimen that is planted in the conservatory. Of course, after seeing this specimen I knew I had to have at least one for my collection and was stoked when I found a few available.
Check out this image I took of the specimen A. cupulispathum at the Huntington. The blades on this plant were about 5' long.

Say, I have experienced the petioles to be kind of weak and need staking to support the huge leaf. Maybe this is due to softer greenhouse growth, or an inherent problem with the juvenile growth?
Have you experienced the same with yours? How much light is your plant exposed to?

Windy

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From: hermine at endangeredspecies.com (hermine) on 2007.11.11 at 17:45:17(16693)
At 04:24 PM 11/11/2007, you wrote:
>???
>Hi Skip,
>
>I also picked up the same plant last year as Cupulispathum.
>Earlier that year I had gone to the Huntington
>Library and photographed their specimen that is
>planted in the conservatory. Of course, after
>seeing this specimen I knew I had to have at
>least one for my collection and was stoked when I found a few available.
>Check out this image I took of the specimen A.
>cupulispathum at the Huntington. The blades on this plant were about 5' long.

this is one gorgeous plant and a wonderful photo.
does this grow outside in normal CA weather at the Huntington?

actually this gave me goosebumps of plant lust when I saw it.

hermine

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From: exotics at hawaii.rr.com (Windy Aubrey) on 2007.11.13 at 12:27:58(16696)
Hi Hermine,

Yes, this plant does cause 'chicken skin'. I had another image of it next to the curator, but wasn't sure if I should use his image. To see it next to a tall man made it even more impressive.

The Huntington grows it inside a climate controlled greenhouse. I'm not sure as to how well it would survive or thrive in the open without the humidity. I think this species may come from a wet area in nature, by the looks of the spath that it presented. It's flower shape was one where the spath acts as an umbrella to protect the spadix from becoming wet during a rain. I can tell you though, this plant has extremely thin leaves that rip, tear and bruise easily. I had dreams of planting one outside in the landscaping, but after growing it for a while I don't think it would look as spectacular with it's blades shredded.

If you get a chance to pick one up, try it as a houseplant, if your greenhouse is too tight.

If you are still located in SOCA, head over to the Huntington for the day. They have recently built a tremendous conservatory with bevy of aroids and other beautiful plants, and it turned out spectacular to say the least!

Windy

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From: kaufmann at sandiego.edu (Ron Kaufmann) on 2007.11.14 at 08:32:30(16697)
Hi All,

For what it's worth, I have an A. cupulispathum that is growing
outdoors next to my greenhouse in coastal Southern California. It's
been there for over a year and survived last winter, when temperatures
dropped to 29 deg F (-2 deg C) for three consecutive nights. Its growth
slowed to virtually nil for several months, but it didn't die and put on
several new leaves this past summer.

Based on what I've seen in the field, I don't expect that this plant
will ever achieve the leaf size of the large specimen in the Huntington
conservatory, which *definitely* is worth a look-see, but it's still
very attractive with its large green blades, each accented by a
red-tinged sinus.

Ron

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From: shanson at emc.com (Skip Hanson) on 2007.11.14 at 09:30:27(16699)
Good morning. Windy is correct, I could not grow this plant outside,
since I live in NorCal and it gets to darn cold up here.
However, I am now curious about Windy's description of the leaves. On my
plant the emerging leaves are delicate, but
the mature leaves are like cardboard and fairly tough ?

I keep this plant in a greenhouse and let it moderately dry out between
watering. I rarely water during the Winter. I made the mistake
of getting the spadix wet and it rotted before it had a chance to
mature, not to bright on my part. With a little cinnamon I was able to
stop

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