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  More on dormancy
From: dmartin at cdmas.crc.fmlh.edu (Don Martinson) on 1997.10.07 at 09:30:39(1399)
Back in July of 1996, I received some Typhonium tubers, courtesy of Rob Mc
Clure. I promptly potted them up and waited. And waited. And waited. I
even dug into the pot several times to make sure that they had not rotted
or been snitched by varmints. Finally, this August, as I was finally
preparing to dump the whole pot in disgust, I noted that one tuber was
finally putting up a sprout. They have all (about 6 of them) now broken
dormancy and are growing just as nice as you please. Did any of the other
recipients have to wait this long (at least 14 months) for their tubers to
sprout? Patience is certainly a virtue when dealing with aroids.

Just curious.

Don Martinson

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From: Krzysztof Kozminski <kk at netgate.net> on 1997.10.07 at 13:03:23(1401)
On Tue, 7 Oct 1997, Don Martinson wrote:

> Back in July of 1996, I received some Typhonium tubers, courtesy of Rob Mc
> Clure. I promptly potted them up and waited. And waited. And waited. I
> even dug into the pot several times to make sure that they had not rotted
> or been snitched by varmints. Finally, this August, as I was finally
> preparing to dump the whole pot in disgust, I noted that one tuber was
> finally putting up a sprout. They have all (about 6 of them) now broken
> dormancy and are growing just as nice as you please.

Yes, a similar experience here. Typhoniums have been waking up over the
past several months. The first that sprouted went dormant after only
about 10 weeks of growth and is now waking up again after a 3-month rest.

Must be some strange effect of the Coriolis force :-)

For me, the record dormancy so far happened in case of Amorphophallus
maximus. Sent out by Wilbert in December 1995, received in a state of bad
desiccation in Jan. 1996, finally put up a petiole in September 1997.
That's at least 22 months of dormancy !

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From: "James W. Waddick" <jim-jim at swbell.net> on 1997.10.07 at 20:18:38(1402)
Aroiders:
Typhonium; I have grown T. giganteum outdoors for about 8 years and
it is absolutely ther last of the hardy aroids to emerge in late summer. It
is not unusual to wait until the end of July-even mid-August before the
first leaf emerges. It stays up right to frost.
On the other hand T. divericatum which is not hardy here goes
dormant about the same time and stay barely dormant in a cool greenhouse
until March or April and continues to grow and bloom off and on all summer.
I'd bet that in a warmer climate it would stay active all year long.

Jim W.

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From: Chris Marsden <Byway at compuserve.com> on 1997.10.14 at 12:48:48(1434)
Hi All,
=

> Back in July of 1996, I received some Typhonium tubers, courtesy of Rob=

Mc
> Clure. I promptly potted them up and waited. And waited. And waited.=
=

I
> even dug into the pot several times to make sure that they had not rott=
ed
> or been snitched by varmints. Finally, this August, as I was finally
> preparing to dump the whole pot in disgust, I noted that one tuber was
> finally putting up a sprout. They have all (about 6 of them) now broke=
n
> dormancy and are growing just as nice as you please. Did any of the
other
> recipients have to wait this long (at least 14 months) for their tubers=

to
> sprout? Patience is certainly a virtue when dealing with aroids.
=

I recieved some from Rob as well, planted them, and forgot them completel=
y.
Then, I noticed a pot this spring, I found the tubers, planted half of
them, gave away the other half in the hope that another far more
experienced aroider and much better grower could grow them and placed the=
m
in my terrarium that has warm temps (in the sixties) and they sprouted.
They kept growing, and putting out more and more leaves, I neglected them=
,
they outhrew the terrarium, their leaves rot as they touch the glass, the=
y
put out more leaves and the whole thing begins again. They're still there=

now. Now I realise they can be grown in temperate conditions I'll put the=

little beggars in the greenhouse, give them more room and actually feed
them next year.

Thanks to everyone like Rob (so that's everyone on this list) who has the=

generosity to give things away, and expect nothing in return. I hope to b=
e
able to contribute something to members as my collection builds up in
numbers, but I could only do this because I have the original material to=

propagate from.

My Kindest and Warmest Aroid Regards,

Toby Marsden

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