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  Hardy Aroids
From: "James W. Waddick" <jim-jim at swbell.net> on 1997.10.23 at 20:48:14(1484)
Dear friends;
This string has turned from Dracunculus to Hardy aroids and I am
surprised that no one has mentioned Calla palustris. This gets to
considerable size, has impressive flowers and fruits and should be hardy
fairly far north - Zone 4, 3?.
Then there's Orontium, Peltandra, and Typhonium,
Zantedeschia..although the latter two may only have 1 or two species hardy
through Zone 6. I'll bet theres other beside the ones we've already talked
about Dracunculus, Arum (various species - I have italicum,maculatum,
orientale and nigrum in Zone 5/6 - others ? I lost dioscorides )
Symplocarpus, Lysichiton, Arisarum etc. (not to mention Arisaema - that's
another robin)
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From: Steve Marak <samarak at arachne.uark.edu> on 1997.10.24 at 07:06:39(1489)
On Thu, 23 Oct 1997, James W. Waddick wrote:

> This string has turned from Dracunculus to Hardy aroids and I am
> surprised that no one has mentioned Calla palustris. This gets to
> considerable size, has impressive flowers and fruits and should be hardy
> fairly far north - Zone 4, 3?.

Jim, I've tried to get Calla palustris several times unsuccessfully -
seeds from an exchange never germinated for me, and plant sources haven't
worked out. Is anyone growing this?

> Then there's Orontium, Peltandra, and Typhonium,
> Zantedeschia..although the latter two may only have 1 or two species hardy
> through Zone 6. I'll bet theres other beside the ones we've already talked
> about Dracunculus, Arum (various species - I have italicum,maculatum,
> orientale and nigrum in Zone 5/6 - others ? I lost dioscorides )
> Symplocarpus, Lysichiton, Arisarum etc. (not to mention Arisaema - that's
> another robin)
> How far north does anyone grow Helicodiceros ?
>
> These are just a start, let's get complete here:

I have several clones of Peltandra establishing, limited data so far but
it seems quite hardy and I've been told it will do well in zone 4. All of
my Zantedeschias except the recently-acquired "Hercules" are outdoors and
all but one of those (Z. pentlandii) have been for several years.

Re Typhonium, there was a deafening silence a few weeks ago when I asked
some questions so I will risk repeating them here:

>While on hardy Typhoniums - Deni Bown, in the 3 paragraphs devoted to
>Typhonium in "Aroids", mentions 2 other species as "hardy": T.
>diversifolium and T. alpinum. "It (T. diversifolium) is found in the
>Himalayas between 2500 m and 4300 m and so, like Arisaema flavum, is a
>near-alpine. The ability to grow at high altitudes is also seen in T.
>alpinum which is recorded as reaching 4000 m in China."

>Can anyone comment on how hardy these species truly are? 4000+ meters is
>high enough that (anywhere much short of the equator) it implies some
>good frosts.

Orontium should be hardy, but I don't have it and don't recall anyone else
talking about it. Why is it so unpopular?

Steve

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From: Doug <dburdic at presys.com> on 1997.10.27 at 07:06:46(1499)
Hi Jim and Everybody,

Collecting hardiness feedback from the group on all these species is an
excellent idea. I can add to this that I am growing one Arum italicum
here on the central Oregon coast (Zones 8-9) which is no big trick I
realize, but thought I'd mention it.

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From: Tom Croat <croat at mobot.org> on 1997.10.27 at 12:17:36(1514)
Steve: We have Orontium in cultivation in our temperate house. I tried
bringing some of it back from Massachusetts once and put it in a small
pond we have behing the Climatron but it did not survive despite having
had a nice big peice of it.
Tom
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From: dmartin at post.its.mcw.edu (Don Martinson) on 1997.10.27 at 12:26:50(1516)
>James W. Waddick wrote:
>>
>> Dear friends;
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From: "Julius Boos" <ju-bo at classic.msn.com> on 1997.10.27 at 15:08:08(1526)
----------
Sent: Monday, October 27, 1997 3:17 PM
To: ju-bo@msn.com
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From: "Dr. Victor G. Soukup" <soukupvg at UCBEH.SAN.UC.EDU> on 1997.10.28 at 09:44:00(1543)
Calla palustris normally grows in wet bogs in mostly full sun. For a
source I suggest that you look for plants in Michigan and when you spot
some (there are usually a lot of them, or one plant with many, many
leads), just reach in and pull up a front lead. Calla is not a rare
plant and removing one or two will not destroy the populations. Be
careful, hpwever, because massasauga rattlesnakes like the drier
portions of these same habitats, and in trying to avoid the deeper,
muckier pools you are apt to head for the higher drier ground.

Good luck,
Vic Soukup

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From: Kristl Walek <garnorth at istar.ca> on 1997.10.28 at 22:03:16(1551)
Steve:

I run a seedhouse for hardy rare perennials called Gardens North in
Ontario, Canada.

I am growing Calla palustris quite successfully here (a cold Z4) and saw
it often last summer on a seed collecting trip across Canada, both in
the wild and in gardens in Zones 3 and colder (Northern Saskatchewan and
Alberta.)

Unfortunately it will be another few years before I have enough seed
producing plants to offer it in my catalogue. If you manage to get hold
of some more seed.....try the following:

-the seed will do much better being sown in a "muck" (a muddy compost).
I normally sow in waterproof containers (recycled plastic take-out is
fine). Allow the water to be about 1" higher than the soil in the
container. This is a good general method to use for many water loving
species.
-give an initial warm period (as warm as possible) of about 4 weeks.
-Then provide about 6-8 (or longer) weeks cold. It doesn't matter if the
muck freezes. So you could pop the lid of your take out container on and
either stick it in your fridge, or put it outside mid winter...

I have successfully germinated it on many occasions using the above
method, although my seed was always fresh, so I do not know if this is
an issue.

Are you in Canada, by any chance??? I don't ship plants outside of the
country at this point....

Kristl Walek

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