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  Amorphophallus kiusianus fresh ripe seeds germination
From: John Ludwig <aroidgrower at gmail.com> on 2008.10.17 at 14:15:26(18647)
I am looking for information on the proper way to germinate
Amorphophallus Kiusianus seeds. These seeds were freshly harvested
recently and A friend of mine whose computer is not working asked me
to pose this question.

Does anybody have experience with this species?

What would be a tried and true way to go about this?

Do the seeds need to dry out before germination will take place or
must they be sown right away before they dry out?

Does the pulp surrounding the seeds ned to be removed before sowing?

Sorry for so many questions, but I have heard and read so many
different methods, that it is hard for me to advise my friend properly.

John Ludwig

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From: "Alan Galloway" <alan_galloway at bellsouth.net> on 2008.10.17 at 17:49:13(18648)
John,

Answers to your questions embedded in your original email:

Subject: [Aroid-l] Amorphophallus kiusianus fresh ripe seeds germination

>I am looking for information on the proper way to germinate
> Amorphophallus Kiusianus seeds. These seeds were freshly harvested
> recently and A friend of mine whose computer is not working asked me
> to pose this question.
>
> Do the seeds need to dry out before germination will take place or
> must they be sown right away before they dry out?
>

seeds of ALL species of Amorphophallus should be kept as moist as
possible!!!!!!!

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From: ALLAN TETZLAFF <atetzlaff at rogers.com> on 2008.10.17 at 20:10:25(18649)
This is one of the easier species as it is one of the few that does not die right away when dried out. I bought a bunch of seed a couple of years ago and planted them - they had been dried and stored, with the pulp removed. I just planted them like you would any seed and I got great results - lots of germination.... If I were you, I would try some each way - some right away and some stored perhaps. Normally, the fresher the better with Amorphophallus, so you might get more by doing them all sooner rather than later. They do seem quite easy though... It's later they can be testy. They don't tend to like hot weather and so can have a shortened cycle and hence not produce a very big bulb, if they're too warm. I had one flower this summer and it was quite bizzare and lovely - and the fruit surrounding the seed turned an amazing blue colour (after having been a rather shocking pink) as they ripened. Quite a show.

Cheers from Canada,

Allan

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From: bonaventure at optonline.net on 2008.10.20 at 12:02:39(18663)
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From: Stanley kaufman <kaufmanrareplants at yahoo.com> on 2008.10.21 at 10:59:42(18666)
Hi,

Is alba or albus a synonym for kiusianus? I saw and alba for sale at Franklin park conservatory gift shop but I had never heard of that species. They pointed out it had a white stem.

but otherwise they seemed to think it was just konjac.

Stan

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From: ALLAN TETZLAFF <atetzlaff at rogers.com> on 2008.10.23 at 03:00:38(18668)
In botany, when people use 'alba' they usually mean a form, not a species (EG. Paph. haynaldianum or Paph. haynaldianum alba - the former having coloured flowers, the latter having green/white flowers).

For Amorphophallus, albus is a species and quite distinct from kiusianus. If you look at pictures on aroid.org, the difference is quite clear.

Cheers,

Allan

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From: bonaventure at optonline.net on 2008.10.23 at 15:12:11(18670)
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From: Susan B <honeybunny442 at yahoo.com> on 2008.10.24 at 08:57:06(18672)
Good post from Allan, but I would like to add there is an Amorphophallus albus and albispathus, both fairly common. Perhaps they get blended together (confused) as alba.
susan

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