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  Small aroids
From: SelbyHort at aol.com on 1997.11.06 at 06:09:17(1579)
Jonathan,

This plant you mention is Syngonium rayi. It was collected in Costa Rica at
the La Selva Biological Research Station. The plant grows in very deep shade
as a terrestrial, creeping along the ground. It was collected in 1985 and was
finally identified in 1991 by Croat. Check with Tom for more details.

Donna Atwood
Selby Gardens

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From: Al Wootten <awootten at NRAO.EDU> on 1997.11.06 at 07:10:09(1580)
SelbyHort@aol.com writes:
> This plant you mention is Syngonium rayi. It was collected in Costa Rica at
> the La Selva Biological Research Station.
Donna, and others,

My son will be participating in a 10th grade ecology class this summer
which will include a ten day trip to Costa Rica, with a stay at La Selva
Biological Research Station. In preparation, he has to do a number of
research projects, involving reading articles on Costa Rican ecology and
then writing a report on what he has found. If anyone has any
recommendations, especially concerning aroids, we would certainly love
to hear about them. I only wish I could go, but they told me that
they had reached their limit!

Clear skies,
Al

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From: ERTELTJB at ctrvax.Vanderbilt.Edu on 1997.11.06 at 07:46:22(1581)
Al - One easily observable aspect of aroid growth which would fall into the
ecology section would be looking at light levels/other trigger mechanisms?
for some Philodendron spp? and definitely some Monstera spp. going from
juvenille to mature leaves, and in some cases back again. He seem to recall
some illustrations on this in Janzen's book on Costa Rican Natural History -
I suspect that that article would lead your son to others on the topic, or
perhaps introduce other topics to him. Check into that book.
Another topic of interest might be an exploration of aroid pollinators -
we generally just hear of the nasty smelling species, but some are quite
wonderful, especially those within the euglossine bee complex. And last but
not least, a topic I find fascinating every time I encounter it is simply
the different pollination complexes which exist, particualrly I'm thinking
of the trapline strategy demonstrated by the euglossine bee complex and by
humminbirds - probably others as well. Neat stuff all - I envy your son!!
- Jonathan Ertelt

From: ERTELTJB at ctrvax.Vanderbilt.Edu on 1997.11.06 at 07:53:15(1582)
Bravo Donna! Thank you so much for the i.d. on the Syngonium! I had the
feeling that when I gave the description on this list, if it had been named
then I would hear about it. Tom - can you provide any additional information,
or let me know what it was published in??
Thank you thank you!
Now - though it's not an aroid, I have a wonderful red-backed small microphylled
Selaginella that I've been growing for years which I believe I rec'd from Marie
Selby and was originally collected in Colombia - any i.d. information on
this non-aroid beauty??
Cheers.
- Jonathan

From: Tom Croat <croat at mobot.org> on 1997.11.06 at 08:04:06(1583)
Al: There is an article written about the Araceae of La Selva by Mike
Grayum in Aroideana. Mike and I have written the Araceae treatment for
the Flora of La Selva but it is not yet published.
Tom
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From: plantnut at shadow.net (Dewey Fisk) on 1997.11.06 at 09:46:03(1585)
>Al: There is an article written about the Araceae of La Selva by Mike
>Grayum in Aroideana. Mike and I have written the Araceae treatment for
>the Flora of La Selva but it is not yet published.
> Tom

Aroideana, Volume 5, #2........for the Grayum article... $5. or $20. for
Vol. 5 (four booklets)
Dewey

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From: Tom Croat <croat at mobot.org> on 1997.11.06 at 10:01:50(1587)
Jonathon: It was published in the most recent Phytologia 82: 53.1997.
The authorities are Croat & Grayum.
tom
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From: BASSPROF at aol.com on 1997.11.07 at 10:50:12(1594)
Dear Johnathan,

Your Selaginella might be S. erythropus. Size and color fits your
description, but I do not know its origin. Hope this helps rather than
confuses.

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