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  rooting plants from leaves
From: Kathy Upton <SKKUPTO at UMSLVMA.UMSL.EDU> on 1997.11.30 at 15:42:45(1668)
Dear aroid propagators:

I have found that the genus Chlorospatha can be propagated from a leaf.
By leaf, I mean the petiole and leaf blade. I placed the petiole of
Chlorospatha croatianum in a peat and perlite mix in a warm humid
growing area and it sprouted roots after 6-7 weeks. It is now sending
up a new leaf. I realize that a few other genera can be propagated in
this way, such as Gonatopus, Zamioculcas (from leaflets), and also
Amorphophallus. But are there other genera that have been propagated
in this way (not by tissue culture)? I'm planning a little experiment
here with Jane Whitehill and would like to know what genera have previously
been rooted this way and what you all might suggest that would seem
the most likely to work. Thanks!

Kathy Upton

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From: plantnut at shadow.net (Dewey Fisk) on 1997.11.30 at 19:27:38(1669)
>I realize that a few other genera can be propagated in
>this way, such as Gonatopus, Zamioculcas (from leaflets), and also
>Amorphophallus.

Kathy,
I am familiar with Gonatopus and Zamioculcas rooting from parts of the
foliage... But, not Amorphophallus... Please explain the procedure..
Thanks,
Dewey

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From: Steve Marak <samarak at arachne.uark.edu> on 1997.11.30 at 20:05:16(1670)
Kathy,

I think we talked about this subject a little several years ago and then
didn't keep up on it.

I have tried several other Amorphs since then with mixed success, which is
what I expected. Some are fairly easy, requiring only a relatively small
piece of leaf and with an average success rate of 2/3, while others won't
strike - for me - no matter what I do.

I can't tell you what the difference is, but I can usually tell by looking
at the leaf of a species whether I'm going to have any success with it.
(This is completely unscientific in that I have no theory to explain that
empirical observation, and no hard evidence to convince anyone else.)

In stark contrast to Gonatopus, where leaflets which fall from the leaf
spontaneously root and form new tubers without my intervention, rooting an
Amorph. leaf requires my help. I haven't tried to propagate my
Zamioculcas, but I haven't noticed any new plantlets turning up in the
pots either.

I suspect that some Dracontiums may be propagated this way, too, but I
haven't tried it yet. I have a nice large leaf on one coming up now, and
it may give some surface area to "science".

Steve

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From: "Dr David Ross Constantine" <drc at globalnet.co.uk> on 1997.12.01 at 06:26:18(1672)
I was interested in Kathy Upton's comments about regeneration from detached
leaves. Someone on another listserv made a similar comment recently about
the phenomenon in the non-aroid Rhododendron. I got quite interested in
epiphyllous shoot formation when I was doing my PhD. In doing my
literature search I came across the following paper;

Hagemann, A., (1932) Untersuchungen an Blattstecklingen.
Gartenbauwissenschaft 6, 69-195.

Hagemann found that detachment was the only stimulus required to induce de
novo shoot and/or root regeneration from leaves of 778 out of 1042
dicotyledenous species; 287 species formed shoots. Hagemann tried a few
aroids and reported roots from 75% of detached leaves of Pothos auritus
and from 100% of detached leaves of Zamioculcas zamiifolia. He also
indicates that Pinellia tuberifera and Zamioculcas Loddigesii (sic) produce
both roots and shoots. (This is an old paper; nomenclature has changed).
Deni Bown (p 114) says of Zamioculcas zamiifolia that "as is quite common
in succulent plants, but unknown elsewhere in Araceae, the leaflets can
sprout into new plants and form tiny tubers at the base".

It is also interesting to note that the bud-inducing properties of kinetin,
the first cytokinin discovered in 1956, were applied horticulturally almost
immediately in a similar non-tissue culture system; see

Plummer, T. H. and Leopold, A. C., 1957. Chemical treatment for bud
formation in Saintpaulia. Proc. J. Amer. hort. Sci. 70, 442-444

It may be that exogenous cytokinin will trigger shoot formation from
detached leaves that do not otherwise respond.

David Constantine

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From: Don Martinson <dmartin at post.its.mcw.edu> on 1997.12.01 at 09:10:23(1673)
>Kathy,
>I have tried several other Amorphs since then with mixed success, which is
>what I expected. Some are fairly easy, requiring only a relatively small
>piece of leaf and with an average success rate of 2/3, while others won't
>strike - for me - no matter what I do.
>
>I can't tell you what the difference is, but I can usually tell by looking
>at the leaf of a species whether I'm going to have any success with it.
>-- Steve Marak
>-- samarak@arachne.uark.edu

This is very interesting, Steve. What species have you had success with,
and what are the leaf characteristics that you look for?

Don Martinson

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