IAS Aroid Quasi Forum

About Aroid-L
 This is a continuously updated archive of the Aroid-L mailing list in a forum format - not an actual Forum. If you want to post, you will still need to register for the Aroid-L mailing list and send your postings by e-mail for moderation in the normal way.

  Amorphophallus konjac size
From: ExoticRainforest <Steve at exoticrainforest.com> on 2010.03.05 at 16:19:43(20699)
_______________________________________________
Aroid-L mailing list
Aroid-L@www.gizmoworks.com
+More
From: ExoticRainforest <Steve at exoticrainforest.com> on 2010.03.05 at 16:19:43(20700)
Wilbert, a question for you butanyone is welcome to chime in.

I have at least 40 Amorphophallus konjac in my yard in NWArkansas (zone 6B) that never come out of the ground. I make zeroclaim to any expertise in these species but I have been reading aboutthem and ran across some information I find "interesting". We have dugup the tubers from time to time in order to transplant or give themthem away but I've never seen any that are huge. The largest is likely15cm (6 inches) across, yet I read posts on some of the garden sitesfrom people that talk about 7 to 9 kilo (15 to 20 pound) tubers growingin fairly cold zones. Is this scientifically possible?

Steve Lucas

HTML

+More

From: "Tom Randall (KB2SMS)" <tommy2005 at hvc.rr.com> on 2010.03.07 at 05:32:13(20703)
Well I have a 4 pounder (6" across) at the start of last spring
that by fall became 11 1/2" across and 13 pounds. So scientifically
speaking that should be proof!

Here's a photo of her after digging out and cleaning:

--Apple-Mail-17--248758335

+More
From: "plantguy at zoominternet.net" <plantguy at zoominternet.net> on 2010.03.07 at 05:57:48(20704)
Steve,

Surely, if one is lucky with the perfect growing season it is
possible....I've personally dug up a 12 pound konjac from my zone 6 garden
in Gibsonia, PA (just north of Pittsbrgh). That may not make it
scientifically possible, but in the real world it is :o) That is the
largest I have had by the way, so it is not an every year thing!! Last
year I even dug up some Typhonium (Sauromatum?) venosum that weighed nearly
4 pounds and were almost 6" in diameter......by far the largest I've ever
seen from my garden!!

Dan

+More
From: <hostas at fuse.net> on 2010.03.07 at 11:07:20(20708)
Good afternoon.

I am a gardener from Cincinnati, Ohio.
It is zone 5/6.

Tony Avent told me years ago that Konjac might be hardy here and to try it and plant it deep. Mine have been in the ground for a little over 8 years and multiply well.
They never bloom and they are not huge.
The largest the plant gets is about 3 1/2 feet. ( I have never dug one up to record the bulb size, but the stem of the plants in the ground are not thick like when planted in pots.)

I mostly grow them in pots and my tubers have often gotten to 8+ inches across. Huge, thick stems and wide beautiful foliage. But when they get that big, they don't put off many bulblets and often the big tuber has problems in storage (much of it rots) or when I dig it up the next year, it has divided into 2 smaller ones, about 4-6 inches across.

Hope you find this of interest!
--
Betty Davis

+More
From: <hostas at fuse.net> on 2010.03.07 at 11:07:20(20709)
Good afternoon.

I am a gardener from Cincinnati, Ohio.
It is zone 5/6.

Tony Avent told me years ago that Konjac might be hardy here and to try it and plant it deep. Mine have been in the ground for a little over 8 years and multiply well.
They never bloom and they are not huge.
The largest the plant gets is about 3 1/2 feet. ( I have never dug one up to record the bulb size, but the stem of the plants in the ground are not thick like when planted in pots.)

I mostly grow them in pots and my tubers have often gotten to 8+ inches across. Huge, thick stems and wide beautiful foliage. But when they get that big, they don't put off many bulblets and often the big tuber has problems in storage (much of it rots) or when I dig it up the next year, it has divided into 2 smaller ones, about 4-6 inches across.

Hope you find this of interest!
--
Betty Davis

+More
From: Ken Mosher <ken at spatulacity.com> on 2010.03.07 at 14:48:10(20717)
Hi Steve. My biggest konjac tuber ever was 23 pounds, but I grow them in
pots, not in the ground.

-Ken Mosher

+More
From: Ken Mosher <ken at spatulacity.com> on 2010.03.07 at 14:48:10(20718)
Hi Steve. My biggest konjac tuber ever was 23 pounds, but I grow them in
pots, not in the ground.

-Ken Mosher

+More
From: ExoticRainforest <Steve at ExoticRainforest.com> on 2010.03.08 at 14:33:29(20723)
_______________________________________________
Aroid-L mailing list
Aroid-L@www.gizmoworks.com
+More
From: ExoticRainforest <Steve at ExoticRainforest.com> on 2010.03.08 at 14:33:29(20724)
Thanks for the responses, especiallythe photo.

Steve

HTML

+More

From: "Marek Argent" <abri1973 at wp.pl> on 2010.03.09 at 12:12:15(20727)
Hello,

From my observation I noticed that Am. konjac as well as other prolific
tuberous aroids like T. venosum or Arisaema spp. grow larger at home. They
produce less offsets so the main tuber grows faster. The same plants growing
outdoors (I live in Z6b/7a), quickly divide instead of increasing the tuber
size. Has anyone noticed the same?

Marek Argent

+More
From: "Tom Randall (KB2SMS)" <tommy2005 at hvc.rr.com> on 2010.03.09 at 15:26:38(20728)
Yes, mine are in pots as well, I add extra Perlite to lighten the
mix and provide good drainage. Although I have to make a large
planter for my 13 pounder this year.

Tom

+More
From: "Tom Randall (KB2SMS)" <tommy2005 at hvc.rr.com> on 2010.03.09 at 15:26:38(20729)
Yes, mine are in pots as well, I add extra Perlite to lighten the
mix and provide good drainage. Although I have to make a large
planter for my 13 pounder this year.

Tom

+More
From: michael kolaczewski <mjkolaffhbc at sbcglobal.net> on 2010.03.10 at 07:15:59(20734)
Greetings, I have had the same experiences with Amorphophallus konjac
in containers. In fact I have attached a photo, not great quality,
of a A. konjac that is about to begin to this season's growth. I have been growing this
one 2.5 years, it was about the size of medium orange when I got it. It lives in a container
outdoors in the late spring through the late summer, then indoors for the winter.
I weighed it here today, nearly 12 pounds. I use a soil less mix of rice hulls, composted
pine bark, peat moss, perlite, and pumice. the bottom of the container has several inches
of crushed pot shards and pumice for drainage.

Michael Kolaczewski

+More
Note: this is a very old post, so no reply function is available.