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  Arum italicum
From: Tony Avent <tony at plantdel.com> on 1997.12.03 at 09:15:48(1697)
On the issue for forcing arums into growth, several years ago, I
purchased dormant stored Arum italicum tubers. Upon planting, they refused
to sprout until 1 year had passed. These had been stored dry in a warehouse
at 50F Night/70F day temps. When I planted them in late winter, nothing
happened until the following fall.

I would like to try again, but would prefer if they would actually
sprout when planted...now. Should I give them a cold treatment or what. As
they aren't daffodils, little research seems to exist.
Tony Avent

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From: Judy Bauer <jbauer at concordnc.com> on 1998.05.22 at 10:17:49(2180)
Hi Aroiders,
A couple of the Arum italicum that I have been growing since 1992 have
finally developed seed pods! The three tablespoons to one gallon of
water solution that I poured on them in early spring seemed to stop the
bloom rot.
Judy Bauer
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From: Don Martinson <dmartin at post.its.mcw.edu> on 1998.05.22 at 18:34:38(2181)
>Hi Aroiders,
>A couple of the Arum italicum that I have been growing since 1992 have
>finally developed seed pods! The three tablespoons to one gallon of
>water solution that I poured on them in early spring seemed to stop the
>bloom rot.
>Judy Bauer
>8440 Huckleberry Trail
>Concord NC 28027
>US plant zone 7

Um... I'm confused. Are you saying that you poured between 3 tablespoons
and 1 gallon of water on them in early spring or that you poured a solution
of 3 tablespoons (of what?) in 1 gallon of water on them to stop bloom rot?

Don Martinson

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From: grsjr at juno.com (George R Stilwell, Jr.) on 1998.05.22 at 18:40:25(2182)
Judy,

How did you get the tablespoons to dissolve?

Ray

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From: "Sue Zunino" <suez at Northcoast.com> on 1998.05.22 at 19:42:16(2183)
>Judy,
How did you get the tablespoons to dissolve?
Ray<

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From: Judy Bauer <jbauer at concordnc.com> on 1998.05.22 at 19:46:46(2184)
Don Martinson wrote:

> >Hi Aroiders,
> >A couple of the Arum italicum that I have been growing since 1992 have
> >finally developed seed pods! The three tablespoons to one gallon of
> >water solution that I poured on them in early spring seemed to stop the
> >bloom rot.
> >Judy Bauer

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From: Al Wootten <awootten at NRAO.EDU> on 1998.05.26 at 07:51:50(2190)
I just noticed that my A. italicum is in bloom here. This is the
first time for this one!

Clear skies,
Al

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From: Gary Meltzer <kathann1 at tsoft.com> on 1999.03.17 at 10:07:08(3114)
Once again my plague plants are coming up all over. If any one wants some,
I'll swap for what have you or send some postage with a mailing label to:
Gary D. Meltzer
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From: "David S." <maui4me at charter.net> on 2004.09.20 at 20:23:15(12211)
I've been growing what appear to be several varieties of Arum italicum for
several years. I first got started with what was sold as A. italicum
through Park Seed Co.'s wholesale division about seven years ago. These
came as quite large, long tubers and were planted vertically about 4" deep.
When they came up, and it became more apparent over the years, they were
very different looking plants. Some of them had large, all green leaves and
others had similar shaped, but not exactly, and had silver patches and spots
on them. The inflorescences are also quite variable. Some are mostly
green, others, greenish yellow and some of those have either a light or
heavy flush of purple inside. Some of them also had purple/red spadixes
while others were white. These all had tall seed spikes with red berries.

They are just now starting to put out leaves and I'm going to tag them as to
leaf type vs. inforescence. To add more confustion to this, I bought
several pots of what were sold as A. italicum 'pictum' a few years ago and
set them out in a raised bed when they went dormant. They had much smaller,
yet elongated tubers and they were growing horizontally. Their leaves are
dark green with heavily silvered veins. They are much shorter plants than
the others mentioned above with somewhat smaller pale green spathes. All
had short seed spikes with orange berries.

I'm having a devil of a time figuring them out. Is this species variable
like this? I've seen so many pictures on the internet that are variously
labeled A. italicum, A. italicum 'pictum', A. italicum var. italicum, A.
italicum subsp. marmoratum, A. maculatum & etc. All of these look like one
or more of what I have. Whatever they are, they are beautiful plants during
the cold weather months! The large one I first mentioned are growing in a
bed interplanted with mature Typhonium venosum. As the arum leaves are
fading, the typhonium leaves are just starting out and the area stays
constantly green all year. Any comments from you all?

Thanks!

David Sizemore

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From: "danny wilson" <mudwasp_ at hotmail.com> on 2004.09.20 at 22:05:38(12212)
A. italicum is one of the most variable plants i have ever seen. Every italicum in my yard, every single one, is different, in every consievable way. So to answer your question, yes, they are extrmemely variable.
>From: "David S."
>Reply-To: Discussion of aroids
>To: "Aroid-L"
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From: Ellen Hornig <hornig at Oswego.EDU> on 2004.09.21 at 06:17:21(12214)
David Sizemore asked about his arums' IDs. It's hard to tell from
descriptions, but the thought occurs to me that you may have some Arum
concinnatum there. If they have very large leaves and spathes, and come
up distinctly earlier than A. italicum 'Pictum' (not a valid name, but
widely used), that might be what they are. I don't have these any more,
but your description of the tuber as being "long" rings a bell.

If you can get hold of Peter Boyce's mongraph, The Genus Arum, you should
be able to ID your plants-

Ellen

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