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  Does anyone grow the real Anthurium hookeri?
From: ExoticRainforest <Steve at ExoticRainforest.com> on 2010.06.10 at 17:21:08(21096)
I
have been seeking a specimen of the real Anthurium hookeri for
years! Before you immediately respond and say yes, please look at the
photos and read the
descriptions in
this thread. The majority of plants
sold in Florida are not the true species known to science as Anthurium
hookeri. but instead a plant using the name as a
common name. This plant appears to be far rarer than many of us
believe. It is found largely in the windward islands of the Caribbean
but also in French Guiana and other countries including Venezuela.
I've talked several times to Joep Moonen in French Guiana about it and
he sees it rarely.

Few people
appear
to be able to
give a good reason why almost everyone in Florida thinks they are
growing Anthurium
hookeri in their yard when they are not. Well known IAS member and
commercial
aroid grower Denis
Rotolante in Homestead offered the best reason I have been able to
find, "As
many nurserymen down here know, Anthurium hookeri is a catch all name
applied
to all bird nest type Anthuriums regardless of true taxonomic origins."

Many of those hybrid plants sold in Florida appear to be more closely
related to
Anthurium
schlechtendalii or Anthurium plowmanii than to Anthurium
hookeri.

If
you believe
you are growing Anthurium hookeri and your plant matches the
photos and
information in this thread I know for certain there are other growers
that
want to
find it, including me!

The
first
two photo
shows a specimen of the true Anthurium hookeri photographed at
the
Missouri botanical Garden. Look closely at the leaves and veins.

One
of
the most
distinctive characteristics of the true Anthurium hookeri is it does
not
produce red berries as is commonly believed on the internet and many
plant forums. The berries of the true species are
white.

Virtually
all the information on
the Internet stating the berries are red is inaccurate. I even found
one noted garden showing a photo of an infructescence with red
berries. The plant
referred to in all the garden site posts appears to be one of the
common plants sold in Florida using the
name only as a common name and not referring to the true species..

The
next
distinctive
characteristic of Anthurium hookeri is the interprimary veins
are evenly spaced
similar to the rungs of a ladder. In
science this even spacing is known as the venation being scalariforme.

Another important
characteristic is a newly emerging leaf unfurls in a way that is not
seen in
other bird’s nest Anthurium species.
The unusual way the new leaves of Anthurium hookeri are
rolled
is known as being supervolute vernation and
are very unusual in most species. That term
indicates the new leaves possess coils
or folds in overlapping whorls.
Vernation refers to the arrangement of young leaf blades and
supervolute
vernation is to possess a convolute arrangement in the folding or
arrangement
of a newly emerging leaf blade with one margin (edge) of the newly
blade
emerging rolled inward toward the midrib and the opposite margin rolled
around
the midrib o the opposite leaf f in a manner similar to the coil at the
end of
a conch shell.

All
bird’s nest Anthurium, at least those that are members of Anthurium
section Pachyneurium, produce convolute new leaves. The
only
difference in supervolute and
convolute vernation is convolute vernation occurs when several leaves
spiral
with the next leaf in a module enclosed within the current leaf. I
realize this
is difficult to understand but look at the leaf in the photo as well as
the
diagram below. Look closely at the diagram of convolute vernation and
you will see the second leaf inside the first leaf which is common to
the way bird's nest forms unfurl. Anthurium hookeri is the
only exception according to Dr. Croat. Tom once indicated he felt
Anthurium hookeri could be in section Porphyrochitonium.

Another
very important characteristic is the real Anthurium hookeri has
tiny
black
dots, especially on the underside of the leaves. In science these
little black
dots are known as glandular punctates.

If you
have real species of Anthurium hookeri please post photos and
if you
know where specimens of your plant can be found please post that as
well.

There
are several other unique characteristics found only on Anthurium
hookeri and
not on the hybrid or miss named plants commonly sold in Florida. If you
want to
learn more the information can be read here:
href="http://www.exoticrainforest.com/Anthurium%20hookeri%20pc.html">http://www.exoticrainforest.com/Anthurium%20hookeri%20pc.html

The
scientific description of Anthurium hookeri is very simple; so
for anyone that

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From: "John" <criswick at spiceisle.com> on 2010.06.11 at 09:59:53(21097)
Steve,

I
believe the true A. hookeri occurs on Trinidad.
This is according to what the late Dr. Richard Howard told me when we were collecting
in Grenada

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From: "Denis Rotolante" <denis at skg.com> on 2010.06.11 at 12:02:48(21098)

Steve:

I grew a crop of seeds froom my stock plant but nobody wanted any so I stopped growing them....there is too much confusion in our industry because growers, interiorscapers and landscapers are saying "Hooker" but they realy mean Pachyneurium Birdsnest types. Next time I have seeds, I'll send them to you and you can give them away to any one who needs them.

they are not Pachyneurium Group Birdsnest Anthuriums and are not as durable as some of the others but they grow just as easy. Got my mother plant from Dr.Tom at Mobot at a Aroid distribution. I haven't seen it lately, I guess I'll have to get my machete out and go to house #6 to the rain forest and track it down.

Denis

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From: ExoticRainforest <Steve at ExoticRainforest.com> on 2010.06.11 at 13:43:01(21099)
Thanks Denis. I've already received mail from folks looking for it as
well.

See you in September.

Steve

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From: ExoticRainforest <Steve at ExoticRainforest.com> on 2010.06.11 at 13:53:18(21100)
Dylan, I have experienced the same thing. I have an Anthurium
schlechtendalli that was in the ground in our atrium for years.
When in the ground it produced fruit every September and I gave away
seeds as well as seedlings. The leaves were always close to 2 meters.

Two years ago I put it in a large pot and hung it from the rafters
since I thought it would be really neat to look up and see the enormous
span of the plant. Since then the leaves have shrunk in size and even
though we've seen four inflorescences this year, nothing has
pollinated. Obviously I am now reconsidering and will likely put it
back in the ground. I know suspect this species really does like lower
light.

If anyone knows why this happens I'd really like to hear an explanation.

I am receiving private mail from folks that want to grow the species Anthurium
hookeri so I'm sure others would like to have specimens of this
unique species.

One day I'm going to find a good reason to come visit the garden!

Steve

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From: "Marek Argent" <abri1973 at wp.pl> on 2010.06.11 at 19:36:14(21101)

Dear Steve,

Is this A. hookeri?

http://www.wschowa.com/abrimaal/araceum/anthurium/hookeri.htm

Marek

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From: "Dave" <davemisc at lalakea.com> on 2010.06.13 at 18:05:19(21103)
I have several here in Hawai’i, that fit all the descriptions
(including the glandular punctuates), and some are setting seed right
now. Surprisingly, I picked them up at the island Lowe’s Hardware in
Kona, fairly large ones (leaves 2’ long) for less than $15 apiece. The
local grower is Novelty Greens, in Hilo.

-Dave

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From: ExoticRainforest <Steve at ExoticRainforest.com> on 2010.06.13 at 18:54:56(21104)
Thanks Dave.

Steve

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From: ExoticRainforest <Steve at ExoticRainforest.com> on 2010.06.13 at 19:03:30(21105)
Hi Marek. I don't claim to be a taxonomist or expert but when I blew
the leaves up 300% the interprimary veins do appear to be
scalariforme. Can you see the black glandular punctates on the bottom
of the leaf? The primary vein count looks OK but Tom, David or Dylon
would be the best to determine if this pant is the species.

Steve

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From: Ferenc Lengyel <feri.lengyel at gmail.com> on 2010.06.14 at 04:06:31(21106)
Marek,

I guess, that without the berries it is not possible to tell if a plant is the real A. hookeri. I have a plant bought as A. hookeri which shows all the features (scalariform veins, black punctuations), but its berries were not white (the pic of the infructescence can be seen here):

http://www.flickr.com/photos/lengyelf/4274882726/sizes/o/

So it is a Holland hybrid :(
The good thing is, that the germination rate is nearly 100% and the berries can be stored for several days (a few weeks) without the seeds loosing their viability significantly. But I don't know if it applies to the species itself too.

Ferenc

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From: <exotics at hawaii.rr.com> on 2010.06.15 at 22:50:41(21109)
Hi Steve,
I wrote to you last year and sent you photos that you used on your web site of the A. hookeri(true species) I am growing. Did you forget or do you feel this is not the true species???
Windy
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