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  Aroid leaf regeneration??
From: ExoticRainforest <Steve at ExoticRainforest.com> on 2010.06.16 at 12:53:38(21110)
I am again doing some digging as a result of an
ongoing
discussion
with a group of growers. It is the opinion of some that aroids can be
induced to generate a totally new plant by placing growth hormone on
the petiole of a leaf. I have read all I can find and do not believe
this information to be accurate.

From
the
text of The Genera of Araceae it appears the only two aroids
that are capable of the
regeneration of a new plant from a leaf are Zamioculcas zamiifolia
and Gonotapus boivinii. This unique ability is the result of a
bulblet being formed at the juncture of the blade and the petiole and
appears to happen as a survival form during hostile seasons of the year.
From TGOA: "Regeneration of tubers, leaves and roots from leaf
segments is well known in Zamioculcas zamiifolia and Gonotapus boivinii
(Engler 1881, Schubert 1913, Cutter 1962). Isolated entire leaflets of
Zamioculcas and Gonotapus spontaneously develop a basal swelling,
followed by the formation of roots and up to 3 buds, over a 6-9 week
period for Zamioculcas. Leaf regeneration in Gonotapus is more rapid.
The results of experimental manipulation of isolated leaflets grown in
culture show that any part of the compound leaf is capable of
regeneration".

One gentleman appears to be insisting any of the other four Gonotapus
species is capable of the same thing. I have read and reread the
section in
TGOA on this subject and there is a mention of a few other aroids that
produce bulblets at the juncture of the leaf and petiole but other Gonotapus
are not mentioned. More from TGOA:

"Leaf tubercles and regeneration. Tubercles regularly develop at
the juncture of leaflet and petiole in Pinellia fernata (Hansen 1881,
Linsbauer 1934, Troll 1939) at the apical end of petiole in Typhonium
bulbiferum (Sriboonma et al. 1994) and at the first and second order
divisions of the leaf of Amorphophallus bulbifer (Troll 1939).
Tubercles in Pinella may also form spontaneously along the petioles or
can be induced at the basal part by cutting into segments (Linsbauer
1934) Tubercles may develop in Typhonium violifolium at the leaf
apex, pale apex and the apex of this sheath (sriboonma et al, 1994)."

Do any of the other four species of Gonotapus
actually do leaf
regeneration? And if not, can any of our scientists give me a source
of documentation as
to why leaf regeneration does not happen in aroids? If any grower has
obsserved this behavior, can you document it?

I am not trying to "win an argument, I just want to make sure I
understand this growth form as it relates to aroids.

Thanks,

Steve

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From: Steve Marak <samarak at gizmoworks.com> on 2010.06.16 at 13:21:42(21111)
Steve,

I hope (and expect) others to quickly chime in on this thread, but I have
often propagated various Amorphophallus from leaf cuttings, as have a
number of others. Kathy Upton and I had some discussion about this many
years ago, I think on Aroid-L, but I've not checked the archives. Even
with my fairly negligent approach, I had pretty good results, and Kathy
- whose technique is much better - was even able to root A. titanum
reliably.

This is not from an entire leaf, of course, only a segment of a leaf, but
there was no "stem" involved (as in how we typically propagate
Philodendron or the other vining genera), and I assume that's what you
mean. As with Gonatopus, if the segment roots, a small tuber will form at
the base of the leaf segment.

I have not tried rooting leaves or leaf segments of other aroid genera,
but wouldn't really be surprised to succeed with some. We should probably
run some tests.

The remarkable thing about Gonatopus boivinii, to me, is not just that a
single leaflet will produce a new plant, but that almost every one roots
without any special care, in almost any kind of environment from
semi-aquatic to fairly arid, and that they can apparently defy gravity,
because I find them in the strangest places.

Steve

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From: "Tony Avent" <tony at plantdelights.com> on 2010.06.16 at 13:52:52(21112)
Steve:

We detailed our research on rooting amorphophallus from leaf cuttings in an article published in Aroideana, Volume 30, 2007. Pinellia can also be rooted, as can some tropical arisaema.

Tony Avent

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From: ExoticRainforest <Steve at ExoticRainforest.com> on 2010.06.16 at 14:35:01(21113)
Thanks Steve. I recall hearing that from Cathy herself sometime along
the way. I am just seeking answers and if anyone has successfully done
it I would like to see the subject discussed. Before I "quote"
something I do my best to find it in one of our texts and since I have
a ton of aroid papers in PDF format ran the word regeneration and a few
other variations threw these files several times. About the only thing
I found of significance were the quotes I used.

Anyone, please feel free to contribute. There are lots of things we as
growers can do together to help advance our science. I tried the
experiment with Zamioculcas a few years ago and finally got a
leaf to root but it was not a fast process.

Steve

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From: ExoticRainforest <Steve at ExoticRainforest.com> on 2010.06.16 at 15:33:34(21114)
Thanks Tony. I will get the article out right away.

Steve

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From: "Marek Argent" <abri1973 at wp.pl> on 2010.06.16 at 15:38:34(21115)

Dear Steve,

While Zamioculcas develops bulbils at the base of the leaflets, Pinellia ternata produces them on petioles during the growth season. When the season ends, the bulbils fall on the ground like seeds. This species also forms bulbils at the top of the leaves (like Amorphophallus bulbifer and some other species). If a leaf of P. ternata becomes broken at the ground level, the leaf can root again from the bulbil.

I propagated experimentally Zamioculcas from leaflets, but it took more than 2 years until the plant reached reasonable measures, is it normal or too long?

Link: http://www.wschowa.com/abrimaal/araceum/propagation/leaf.htm

Best,

Marek Argent

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From: brian lee <lbmkjm at yahoo.com> on 2010.06.16 at 15:56:24(21116)
Dear Steve and All,

Aloha.

I have not done it myself, but, Peter Boyce told me that certain clumping species of Schismatoglottis can be propagated by leaf cuttings. I have no idea if this extends to the whole genus, but, perhaps Peter will respond. This conversation arose due to the habit of certain Schismatoglottis that pup and the mother plant dies. While I am on this forum, I'd love to see more species of Schismatoglottis in cultivation. It is like Philodendron and Anthurium...large genera, but relatively few species in cultivation. Unfortunately, this is not likely to change in the near future.

Aloha,

Leland

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From: Brian Williams <pugturd at windstream.net> on 2010.06.16 at 19:43:47(21118)
This is slightly different but I remember Craig Allen when he worked at
Fairchild had an unusual Anthurium that was producing tons of new plants
off of the root tips. I have photos of it and I have not seen it sense
but the conditions in the greenhouse were very good and it seems this is
possibly the main reason the plant was producing small plants off the
root tips.
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From: ExoticRainforest <Steve at ExoticRainforest.com> on 2010.06.17 at 03:45:17(21119)
Interesting! Tom, are you aware of this?

Steve

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From: ExoticRainforest <Steve at ExoticRainforest.com> on 2010.06.17 at 04:36:18(21121)
Thanks Leland. Pete?

Steve

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From: "Tom Croat" <Thomas.Croat at mobot.org> on 2010.06.17 at 11:56:40(21123)
Dear Steve: Yes, I have seen plantlets produced at roots. I think it
is relatively common but I don't remember specifically which species do
it.

Tom

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From: ExoticRainforest <Steve at ExoticRainforest.com> on 2010.06.17 at 17:42:26(21125)
Thanks Tom.

Steve

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