IAS Aroid Quasi Forum

About Aroid-L
 This is a continuously updated archive of the Aroid-L mailing list in a forum format - not an actual Forum. If you want to post, you will still need to register for the Aroid-L mailing list and send your postings by e-mail for moderation in the normal way.

  Dracunculus and Dracunculus
From: "Marek Argent" <abri1973 at wp.pl> on 2010.09.02 at 16:54:37(21367)
Hello,

While searching the web for documents I found something that made me scared.

Besides Dracunculus vulgaris and Dracunculus canariense, which we almost all heard about,

I found a document mentioning different species of Dracunculus which are... Nematodes:

http://www.cartercenter.org/documents/2147.pdf

Is it admissible for two quite different unrelated taxa to bear the same generic name?

???

Marek

HTML

+More

From: "J. Agoston" <agoston.janos123 at gmail.com> on 2010.09.04 at 17:43:58(21385)
Marek,

Yes animals and plants can have same gereric names, like Pieris brassicae is a butterfly eating brassicas, but Pieris japonica is a plant from Ericaceae as i know.

Jan

HTML

+More

From: "Ertelt, Jonathan B" <jonathan.ertelt at Vanderbilt.Edu> on 2010.09.05 at 14:36:21(21398)
Marek,

Yes it is admissible apparently – I found this to be the case when a search for images in the genus Drymonia(Gesneriaceae) also started turning up numerous images of moths, genus – Drymonia.

I’ve come across other examples as well, but this is the only one coming to mind right now. Happy Labor Day.

Jonathan

HTML

+More

From: Zach DuFran <zdufran at wdtinc.com> on 2010.09.07 at 08:28:22(21411)
Another example is the genus Heliconia, which applies to
butterflies which feast on Passionflowers (Passiflora), and also applies to the
a tropical genus in the Zingerberales order, Heliconiaceae family. These are
the “False Bird of Paradise” or “Lobster claws” plants,
which have very colorful inflorescences.

The Heliconia butterfly genus is now being called
Heliconius, so that helps a little bit.

Zach

HTML

+More

From: Johannes Moonen <emeraldjunglevillage at wanadoo.fr> on 2010.09.08 at 03:06:35(21418)
Dear Zach,

as you said Heliconius is a genus of beautifull butterflies that merely feed on certain species of Passiflora.

Heliconia is a SA genus of about 200 species of very nice terrestrial plants with beautifull flowers. Some species are grown allover the tropics because of their durable flowers and restistance agains insect appetire.

Cheers, Joep

HTML

+More

From: "Marek Argent" <abri1973 at wp.pl> on 2010.09.08 at 16:37:06(21424)
Indeed, there are more examples:

There are birds and plants Prunella and Oenanthe,

not so funny.

Marek

HTML

+More

From: Peter Boyce <phymatarum at googlemail.com> on 2010.09.10 at 21:27:43(21440)
Yes, provided that are not in the same kingdom. So, you can have
animals and plants and fungi sharing the name. Araceae has an example Hapale (a
syn of Hapaline) and also a genus of marmoset.

P.

HTML

+More

From: Ferenc Lengyel <feri.lengyel at gmail.com> on 2010.09.11 at 13:38:21(21444)
An interesting example: Pterolepis. It is 1. a prehistoric ostracoderm fish genus, 2. a genus in the katydid family Tettigoniidae and 3. a plant genus in the family Melastomataceae.

Ferenc

HTML

+More

Note: this is a very old post, so no reply function is available.