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  Why is Monstera deliciosa to be kept in the adult
From: "John" <criswick at spiceisle.com> on 2010.09.04 at 14:19:31(21378)
Could it have anything
to do with it being a high altitude species?

John.

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From: Johannes Moonen <emeraldjunglevillage at wanadoo.fr> on 2010.09.04 at 14:42:18(21379)
Dear Ferek,

i keep M delicosa since 1991 on my lawn. They where 2 cuttings i
'found' in Caracas. by time they developed great leaves and have
flowered, but not regulary. I don not do anyting for them, just let
them creep on the ground.
I have seen this in gardens in Fla too.

In the 60's M. deliciosa was in Holland a fashionplant.
I t might be responsible for my love for aroids.

Cheers, Joep Moonen

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From: Ferenc Lengyel <feri.lengyel at gmail.com> on 2010.09.05 at 11:42:56(21394)
Dear John, I don't know if the fact that M. deliciosa is a higher altitude species has anything to do to the phenomenon described in the title, but it explains why I saw a lush wall of this plant flowering and fruiting in a park in Lisbon, Porugal, which is not a tropical.

country.
Dear Mr Moonen,

What you wrote supports that M. deliciosa does not need to climb and grown as an epiphite to keep its adult form and flower. It doesn't even have to be in a humid environment, as all the plants in flats and offices keep their adult form with large, wonderful leaves and sometimes they flower in such conditions. When I cut my M. deliciosa into one leaved cuttings, they grow a new shoot from the node developing to a new plant with the adult leaf form. On the other hand, someone wrote somewhere (maybe on this forum?) that he got a cutting of a M. dubia (or tenuis? I remember) from an adult plant but it reverted to the juvenile form. The other Monstera species that is sometimes available here in Europe (maybe M. adansonii, or a hybrid, I don't know, but it is from Holland) is always in its juvenile form. I sometimes see M. dubia plants offered on the internet, and they are always in the juvenile form. So it seems that M. deliciosa somewhat differs from other Monstera species and other climbing aroids in the way it regulates the switch between juvenile and adult forms. Or am I wrong?

Ferenc

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From: Harry Luther <hluther1 at hotmail.com> on 2010.09.07 at 23:44:20(21416)
In 1986 a group from Selby encountered Monstera deliciosa in a cloud forest on Cerro Colorado, ca 1250 m in Chiriqui, Panama. Plants were all terrestrial or lthophytic in light gaps. Localised, not at all common there. Perhaps hemiepiphytic if trees were larger.      HEL
 

From: denis@skg.com

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From: Ferenc Lengyel <feri.lengyel at gmail.com> on 2010.09.08 at 00:28:44(21417)
Dear Denis,
Thank you for the answer. Really interesting point to consider (I mean the second paragraph of your letter). I was speculating myself too, weather the M. deliciosa plants offered here in Europe are all the offspring of a selected strain... Maybe someone can tell me how the wild plants of this species behave...

Ferenc

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From: Ernesto Collosi <ernestocollosi at hotmail.com> on 2010.09.09 at 10:37:27(21425)
Denis,
Do you know where I can get a Philodendron williamsii or stenolobum?
Thanks,
Ernesto

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From: "John" <criswick at spiceisle.com> on 2010.09.10 at 16:52:41(21438)
I can send you seeds
of P. stenolobium next time I get
some on my plants. John.

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From: Ernesto Collosi <ernestocollosi at hotmail.com> on 2010.09.12 at 15:20:23(21456)
John,
Thanks
Ernesto

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