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  Philodendron pedatum?
From: "Marek Argent" <abri1973 at wp.pl> on 2011.01.21 at 16:18:19(21788)

Dear Friends,

Can you confirm that the plant is Philodendron pedatum (laciniatum) or maybe a different one like Ph. squamiferum?

Marek Argent

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From: =?UTF-8?Q?Genevi=C3=A8ve_Ferry?= <jpcferry2 at wanadoo.fr> on 2011.01.23 at 01:45:02(21796)
Bonjour ,

It’s not Philodendron squamiferum .

Yes , I think , that it’s Philodendron pedatum .

Best regards

Geneviève Ferry

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From: Marcus Nadruz <mnadruz at jbrj.gov.br> on 2011.01.23 at 11:44:36(21798)
Maybe P. quinquelobum?

Marcus

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From: Zach DuFran <zdufran at wdtinc.com> on 2011.01.24 at 06:18:34(21800)
Marek-

I would lean towards
Philodendron pedatum. The plants of P. squamiferum that I have seen have much more elongated squamules on the petioles. Here’s an example:

http://zachandchristie.com/plant_pics/aroids/squamiferum_pubescens.jpg
.

Zach

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From: "Denis" <denis at skg.com> on 2011.01.26 at 08:30:42(21817)
Have you considered the possibility that this may be a hybrid Philodendron with P. squamiferum in the parentage. Every aroid plant out there does not have to fall into a species category. Philodendrons have been out there in the house plant and interiorscape industry for many years. And, hybrids have been made to try and improve this very popular and easy to grow genus of aroids.

Just to make my point I have a story to tell. A friend who was an orchid judge traveled to an Orchid Show in South America and while traveling in the countryside there he found in a local market place some new and different Dieffenbachia plants. The thought popped into his head that I am in a remote village, these must be new species propagated by a local plantsmen. So he bought some and brought them back to his nursery in the USA. He was very surprised to learn from his son that these were new Hybrid varieties produced in Tissue Culture labs for the house plant industry. The moral to the story is that even in a remote location, it is a small world and there are plant lovers there who want the newest and best plants, and of course Don’t assume every plant is a species.

Denis

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From: Ferenc Lengyel <feri.lengyel at gmail.com> on 2011.01.26 at 12:05:37(21830)
Dear Marek,

The specimen of Ph pedatum pictured by Jooep Moonen seem to have similar reddish petioles on Steve's website:

http://www.exoticrainforest.com/Philodendron%20pedatum%20pc.html

Ferenc

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From: Eduardo Gomes Goncalves <eduardo.goncalves at inhotim.org.br> on 2011.01.26 at 17:02:20(21832)
Dear Marek,

Philodendron pedatum and P. quinquelobum have both smooth petioles but I could note that the petioles in your plant is somewhat warty. To me is a not-so-warty form of Philodendron squamiferum, maybe it is one of those plants produced by micropropagation. Do you know from where it is?

Very best wishes,

Eduardo.

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From: "Marek Argent" <abri1973 at wp.pl> on 2011.01.27 at 17:09:04(21835)
Dear Eduardo,

I got the photos from William Wissler in Australia, he wrote:

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