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  depolluting plants
From: =?iso-8859-1?Q?Genevi=E8ve_Ferry?= <jpcferry2 at wanadoo.fr> on 2011.12.05 at 17:24:59(22445)
Dear aroiders ,

I want your opinion on depolluting plants because the aroids family is often present (Anthurium, Pothos, Philodendron and especially Spathyphillum). There are scientific studies about aroids? If so, which?
Or that is only a means for commercial sale?
I 'm very interested.

All the best ,

Geneviève Ferry

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From: The Silent Seed <santoury at aol.com> on 2011.12.08 at 05:17:47(22449)
What do you mean ?

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From: "Denis" <denis at skg.com> on 2011.12.08 at 14:32:33(22452)
There is a great deal of research going on at the University of Georgia by Dr. Bodie Panisi concerning the ability of plants to remove organic compounds from the air… Unfortunately they are using common houseplants which are available in greenhouse production by tropical foliage plant industry and they are not all Aroids.

Main thrust of her research was to see if house plants and interiorscape plants in homes and offices do help to detoxify our air. So far the answer is “yes” they do but it varies from variety to variety as to how much stuff they can ameliorate.

See if you can locate her published work on line or through the university of Georgia.

Denis

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From: Theodore Held <oppenhauser2001 at gmail.com> on 2011.12.08 at 14:35:20(22453)
Genevieve,

I have never heard of this term myself. It seems from your message
that people are advertising plants as being "de-polluted". Is that
correct? If that is so, my initial reaction is that it is a false
claim. The amount of pollution is going to be almost unimaginably low
in a cultivated plant that looks healthy. Even if a plant did have
some low level of pollution (and one wonders what that term might
mean; it could mean heavy metals, plutonium, organic toxins, or any
number of substances) in its tissues, unless you ate a very large
quantity, the transfer to you or your environment will be essentially
nil.

Maybe someone else has better information here. But you raise my
natural scientific skepticism.

Ted Held

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From: "Paul T." <ptyerman at ozemail.com.au> on 2011.12.08 at 22:28:30(22456)
Geneviève,

The usual lore is that Spathipyllum remove 7 (or is it 9?
Can't remember right now) harmful pollutants from the air in an office
environment and are apparently the best plant to grow for cleaning up the
air in your office. How that is measured I do not know, but I would
imagine that there should BE a study or studies about somewhere. It
would be interesting to see what other plants have been found to have the
same effects, both indoors and also outdoors in polluted areas. I
know there are a lot of plants that are suited to helping salinity issues
in farmlands, but these are generally salt tolerant plants that lower the
water table, thereby dropping the salinity in the surface soil that
"we" use. As you say though, it seems that aroids are the
ones usually mentioned for indoor cleansing of the air.

I'll also be interested to see what others have to say.

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From: "Sherry Gates" <TheTropix at msn.com> on 2011.12.08 at 23:17:14(22457)
Hi everyone,

I remember NASA doing a study about this very thing. Here's a link to a little info about it. I'm sure y'all can find other information as well.

I wish every one of y'all and your loved ones the Happiest and Merriest Christmas ever!

Sherry

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From: =?iso-8859-1?Q?Genevi=E8ve_Ferry?= <jpcferry2 at wanadoo.fr> on 2011.12.12 at 17:18:41(22465)
Dear Sherry,

Thank you very much for this information and best wishes for you too,

Geneviève

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From: =?iso-8859-1?Q?Genevi=E8ve_Ferry?= <jpcferry2 at wanadoo.fr> on 2011.12.12 at 17:32:23(22466)
Dear Theodore ,
I do not know the exact word that refers to plants that absorb pollution. I
apologize.
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From: =?UTF-8?Q?Genevi=C3=A8ve_Ferry?= <jpcferry2 at wanadoo.fr> on 2011.12.12 at 17:34:57(22467)
Dear Denis ,

Thank you for the address of Dr Bodie Panisi .

Cordialy,

Geneviève

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From: =?UTF-8?Q?Genevi=C3=A8ve_Ferry?= <jpcferry2 at wanadoo.fr> on 2011.12.12 at 17:42:08(22468)
Dear Santory ,

I want to know if there are scientific studies that prove the role of plants to clean up our apartement?
Thank you for your help.
Sincerely,

Geneviève

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From: "Marek Argent" <abri1973 at wp.pl> on 2011.12.13 at 00:04:42(22471)
Hello,

They tested only the most popular houseplants, so it makes me suppose that
there are a lot of depolluting plants among aroids, especially these with
broad leaves, living in humid, shady places. I read somewhere that plants
such ecosystems emit beneficial negative ionisation what reduces stress and
relaxes, oppositely to thorned xerophytes from dry biomes which ionisate
positively. We often feel much better in forests, especially after rains,
and we get stressed in deserts.

Marek

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From: George Yao <geoyao at gmail.com> on 2011.12.30 at 18:41:24(22501)
Genevieve,

In case you might be interested, I just came across this book on Amazon: "How to Grow Fresh Air: 50 House Plants that Purify Your Home or Office". This is the link: http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0140262431/optimalwellnessc.

George Yao

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