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  Message from Bernhard about Typhonium
From: Zach DuFran <zdufran at gmail.com> on 2013.05.07 at 09:05:49(22785)


Aroiders,

in our German
amorphohallus-forum we have a question to explain a often seen mark on
big T. venosum tubers.

For details see the pictures and contributions in
posts # 96, 93, 97 and 98.

The forum language is German but at the bottom of
the page there is translation fuction implemented.

In German:

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From: "D. Christopher Rogers" <branchiopod at gmail.com> on 2013.05.07 at 11:46:20(22786)
Hiyer, Bernhard!

I think that you mean the mark that would appear to be a depression in the side of the tuber. If that is the case, I think that is where and offset was released, and some rot occurred at the union and then healed.

I have had plants of this species and some Amorphophallus that would occasionally not completely consume the old tuber. However, the remains of the old tuber were always directly below the new tuber. The central primary growing point of the plant is that central point, surrounded by the primary roots, where the leaf and inflorescence grow up and the tuber shrinks and and regrows from the bottom. This is the apical meristem, and the leaf and inflorescence will always grow from that same spot, year after year.

Remember that as the inflorescence and leaf grow, the tuber shrinks towards the meristem, like a deflating balloon. It regrows in the same way, expanding outward like a balloon from that same point. It is not like Anchomaenes or Gonatopus, where leaves can grow anywhere over the upper surface of the tuber and the tuber is not completely consumed.

I really hope that this helps!

Happy days,

Christopher

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From: Zanezirklejr at aol.com on 2013.05.13 at 10:21:09(22787)
Its sauromatum venosum.

In a message dated 5/7/2013 2:28:18 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time, zdufran@gmail.com writes:

Aroiders,

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From: "D. Christopher Rogers" <branchiopod at gmail.com> on 2013.05.29 at 06:35:44(22789)

Hi Christopher.

thanks for your explanations and your
points illustrated by your "ballon"picture of the meristem/growing point describes nicely what my picture of the growing
of a Typhonium tuber was or still is.
I
notioced the remains of the
old not totally consum
tuber at the very bottom of the tuber or
below the new grown tuber
at
the end of the growing season as well.

However, I cannot follow your suggestion on the marks our very observant member olvi
found.

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From: "Wilbert Hetterscheid" <hetter at xs4all.nl> on 2013.06.01 at 03:38:28(22795)
Hi Christopher,

Such a mark is the scar of the previous inflorescence (-peduncle). It is also a clue as to the "new"tuber is built from the previous one. The old one is obviously not just "swallowed up" by the new growth but only partly and then new tissue is added. It is in fact a vertical rhizome, that builds a new module every year and discards of most of the pre-last module in the process but not all of it.

Cheers,

WIlbert

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From: "StroWi at t-online.de" <StroWi at t-online.de> on 2013.06.02 at 01:52:44(22796)
Hi
Wilbert,

thanks for the explantion.

I'll inform
our very observant amorphophallus.forum.de member olvi who grows his
'Indian Giant' in Helsinki that his thoughts went to the right
direction.

So it's a vertical rhizome and not what we call in
German "Wechselknolle" known for instance from Crocus; or is
the 'tuber in Crocus also a vertical rhizome?

Cheers,
Bernhard.


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From: "D. Christopher Rogers" <branchiopod at gmail.com> on 2013.06.03 at 07:03:43(22797)
Dear Wilbert,

Fascinating! Thank for the explanation. Then, does that mean that Saromatum is monopodial? Is the tuber in part stem tissue?

Happy days,

Christopher

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