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  Pinellia from seeds
From: Ken Mosher <ken at spatulacity.com> on 2013.08.22 at 13:00:44(22898)
My Pinellias have been dropping seeds all over for many weeks. If I collect it is it important to plant it while they're still surrounded by the fleshy berry or can I wait until I've collected for a few weeks even though most of them will have dried by then?

Thanks,
Ken

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From: "D. Christopher Rogers" <branchiopod at gmail.com> on 2013.08.22 at 13:26:49(22899)
Hiyer, Ken!

I have had it grow just fine scattering the berries around in leaf litter. It can become a pest for some. I love the genus.

Cheers!

Christopher

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From: Don Martinson <llmen at wi.rr.com> on 2013.08.22 at 14:08:22(22900)
I can only speak to the habits of Pinellia pedatisecta, which is on the verge of taking over parts of my garden. Even up here is southern Wisconsin, it has no problem with simply scattering its own seeds which readily germinate the next spring with absolutely no help from me. And I swear that the germination rate must be in the high 90’s from the amount of seedlings I end up with. The leaves are attractive, but the inflorescence and infructescence are pretty unremarkable.

This would suggest that at least for this species, the removal of the flesh berry (not very large, I might add) is not necessary for future germination.

Don Martinson

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From: DAVID LEEDY <djleedy at sbcglobal.net> on 2013.08.22 at 16:00:36(22901)
I like that genus also, maybe because even I can grow it. Have been looking for the variegated form of P. tripartitum or P. pedisecta, but all specialty nurseries are "growing for stock." Anyone have an extra or so, let me know the price at my private email address (djleedy@sbcglobal.net)

David Leedy

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From: Ken Mosher <ken at spatulacity.com> on 2013.08.23 at 00:15:21(22902)
Yes, the two patches of P. pedatisecta growing in my outdoor garden
are ever expanding. I had no intention of removing the seed from
the berry but I'm still wondering if I collect the berries/seeds
over time and pile them up in a bowl indoors will it harm them to
get dried out?

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From: Ken Mosher <ken at spatulacity.com> on 2013.08.23 at 00:27:05(22903)
Hi Chris, I don't find them to be pesty at all! They're scattering
themselves around fairly nicely but I need to relocate those patches
because they're in an inconvenient location in my big garden. Also,
the P. tripartita that seeded itself in the floor of my greenhouse
under one of the benches is on my chore list to move outdoors in the
spring. In the meantime I thought I'd collect a bunch of this
year's infuctuscenses and sow the seed in the new locations.

My P. pedatisecta is growing in full sun in normal garden loam. It
seems happy enough. The P. tripartita is growing in the
sandy/rocky/gravelly floor of the greenhouse. No organic matter at
all but since they're under one of the benches they get a lot of
fertilizer.

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From: "D. Christopher Rogers" <branchiopod at gmail.com> on 2013.08.23 at 09:49:45(22904)
Hiyer, Ken!

Sigh. I wish I could go. It has been about four years for me as well . . . and I miss the plants and the camaraderie. Aroid people are the best! Plus I learn so very much and buy too many plants. But my personal travel budget is pretty tapped out. For work this year I was in Australia and Costa Rica.

Your Pinellia sound really happy. I moved from California to Kansas three years ago and the Pinellia pedatisecta and the P. tripartita took it in stride. My P. cordata and P. ternata came up the first summer and never were seen again. I need to try that one again some time.

I have never had them as pests, though I know some who have. I just bury my outdoor aroids in a foot or so of leaf litter each autumn, and they seem to pop up just fine when the snows abate. This has worked for those two Pinella, Helicodiceros, Dracunculus, and most Arisaemas and Arums. My Arisaema ringens, Arum hygrophilum, and Arisarum simmorrhinum did not survive, along with the P. cordata and ternata.

Strangely, my Typhonium gigantea did fine the first summer, even bloomed, then vanished the next two summers. I thought it was gone, and then it came up this past fortnight with large leaves, happy as can be, as if no years were skipped. Go figure!

Happy days!

Christopher

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From: DAVID LEEDY <djleedy at sbcglobal.net> on 2013.08.26 at 12:39:59(22906)
Hello All,

To continue this string, has anyone successfully crossed P. tripartitum with P. pedisecta?

How is this accomplished (illustrations, if possible).

Thanks.

David Leedy

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