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  Aroid-L Digest, Vol 118,
From: "S.M. Wellinga" <s.m.wellinga at symphyto.nl> on 2014.09.29 at 13:11:45(23115)
Hi Greg, John and Tom,

Thank you for each of your replies. With respect to Greg's suggestion to contact Anthura about the availability of true-to-species material of Anthurium scherzerianum, I will give it a try, although I am not sure how forthcoming a commercial enterprise will be when it comes to sharing material from their botanical gene pool with a private grower like me.

Both John and Tom suggested that cultivating a species like A. scherzerianum at sea level might be a problem. However, although The Netherlands is indeed much less elevated than the natural habitats this species hauls from in Costa Rica (to make matters worse, I am not even living at sea level, but actually a couple of meters below ;-)), it doesn't exactly have a tropical climate. Ours is a 'moderate maritime climate', and while we receive a bit less rain and see the sun more often, and our monthly average relative humidity is a bit higher (75-90%) and temperature extremes are a bit more pronounced (both with respect to highs and lows), conditions in The Netherlands are more or less comparable to those in the British Isles. Most of the plants I grow stem from altitudes between 1,400-2,400 m asl and some from even higher elevations, and a species like, for instance, Anthurium cabrerense - which growers in the southern states of the US have difficulty with- does well under my growing conditions. I am therefore pretty convinced that I'd also be able to keep A. scherzerianum in good health, especially so since when I was a small boy, this species used to be a fairly common houseplant - such, before it was discarded by large commercial nurseries in favour of higher yield crops like today's Anthurium hybrids.

As to your suggestion, Tom, to send you pictures of the unidentified Anthurium species that I bought from Ecuagenera as Anthurium flavolineatum, I currently don't have any. It isn't a problem to produce a series next weekend, but the thing is my plant is currently not in anthesis. How useful would pictures of the plants' habit, leaves, stem etc. be to you, without being able to see what its spathe and spadix look like? I could of course send you a description of both, but since I have to do this from memory, it might be lacking in the kind of detail you probably need.

With best regards,

Simon M. Wellinga

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From: Tom Croat <Thomas.Croat at mobot.org> on 2014.09.29 at 14:57:59(23117)
Dear Simon: Actually most species that I know well can be determined without flowers even though it is helpful to have flowers. I can at least determine if they are sending you something that is far afield from flavolineatum (often this is the case.). I was trying to figure out how you could be below sea level until I remembered that you were in Holland. Actually Holland is a wonderful environment for growing high elevation plants owing to the latitude and the prevailing climate generated by the gulf stream. My colleague Genevieve Ferry and I are often growing the exact same plants and they thrive in Nancy and die here owing to the heat.

Tom

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From: Tom Croat <Thomas.Croat at mobot.org> on 2014.09.29 at 15:03:14(23118)
Simon: I have a first cousin in California who has your last name. She married a guy from Orange City, Iowa, Burt Wellinga, from a big center for Dutch Reformed church here in the US. Do you know of any relatives in Iowa?

Tom

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From: "John Criswick" <criswick at spiceisle.com> on 2014.09.29 at 17:07:17(23119)
Hi Simon,

Of course my remarks about altitude referred only to the tropics. Your altitude in the Netherlands is not applicable, since you are growing in controlled temperature greenhouses.

What matters is temperature. Whilst you referred to 75 to 90% humidity you did not give temperatures.

In the tropics, temperatures lessen with altitude. (As elsewhere.) Here in Grenada at low altitudes we experience temperatures between 75 degrees and 30 degrees. This is too high for A. scherzerianum.

Please let me know the temperatures in your greenhouses.

John.

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From: "S.M. Wellinga" <s.m.wellinga at symphyto.nl> on 2014.10.01 at 08:54:54(23120)
Hi Tom,

It is nice to hear that there is a good chance that you may be able to positively ID my unknown Anthurium by means of pictures of its habit, even while information on its inflorescences is lacking. I will make photographs of the plant this weekend, and share them with you, along with measurements of its leaf blades, petioles, geniculae etc.

Question: to where should I upload my pictures? I have seen on several occasions that pictures sent as attachments to the list got scrubbed, so this is obviously not the right way.

As to your question about the husband of your first cousin, Burt Wellinga, I sent you a message to your Mobot mail address.

With best regards,

Simon M. Wellinga

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From: "S.M. Wellinga" <s.m.wellinga at symphyto.nl> on 2014.10.02 at 13:25:26(23123)
Hi John,

In reply to your question about the temperatures in my greenhouse, the following. They vary, depending on the position relative to the heater and the floor, between 10-16 C (50-60 F) during winter nights, and 16-20 C (60-68 F) during winter days, and 14-20 (57-68 F) during summer nights, and 24-32 C (75-90 F) during summer days, and only very occasionally up to 35C (95 F). Summer extremes, however, never last long in a water rich country like ours (after a couple of days so much ambient humidity has been built up, that more often than not thunderstorms reset the cycle and wash excessive warmth away). It is also my experience that for many higher altitude plants it is not the daily maxima that matter most, but the nocturnal lows, and probably even more so daily excursions in temperature. Although there will no doubt be many exceptions, a short heat wave seems to do less harm than prolonged periods with warm nights, and these never occur in our neck of the woods; nights with temperatures above 20 C are an exception and do not even occur every year.

Anyhow, my growing conditions give me quite some wiggle room to accommodate plants that are either cool-temperate or warm-temperate growers, and like I wrote previously, a higher altitude species like Anthurium cabrerense does well for me (as do the higher altitude orchids that I grow), although growth does slow down during hotter weather. Plants that like even less warmth (such as some of my epiphytic cacti and orchids, that come from altitudes around 2,800 m.), are kept in one of my bedrooms, which has northeast facing windows and during summer days always stays cooler than the outside. The tropical epiphytes I am growing come from altitudes between some 800 and 2,800 m. asl, and I am therefore not afraid to try my hand at growing Anthurium scherzerianum too, especially so since some 40 years ago this species used to be quite a common windowsill plant in our country, which my mother and both my grandmothers kept going for many years. Should therefore any of you reading this be able to point me to a cutting or fresh berries of this species, I would be delighted to hear.

With best regards,

Simon M. Wellinga

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From: Tom Croat <Thomas.Croat at mobot.org> on 2014.10.02 at 14:46:32(23124)
Dear Simon: If you use Dropbox you could send your pictures by that means. You could also click on the link for our PDF server and place them there. I will send you the link. Otherwise just send them as a series of email messages. I think that the limit might be 10 MB per message but I am not sure.

I will assume that you will tell me what Ecuagenera told you about the plant, if anything.

Tom

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From: "John Criswick" <criswick at spiceisle.com> on 2014.10.02 at 15:21:02(23125)
Hi Simon, it seems difficult to believe that in a country like Holland, renowned world-wide for glass-house cultivation, you are unable to find a specimen of A, scherzerianum ! It is the number one country where I would expect to find it.

Anthura bv used to grow a whole range of colours in A. scherzerianum, including speckled ones. What could have happened to them and why did they lose popularity?

Of course your temperatures sound ideal for this species.

John.

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