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  Zamioculcas
From: tychen at ippfwhr.org on 1997.01.17 at 12:23:49(165)
dear aroiders,

i got two small zamioculcas at the philadelphia flower show last year.=

can someone give me cultural tips for these guys? currently i have
them in a north, cool window and they seem to be dormant, still green
but not growing. does this plant require full sunlight?

any help or advice would be appreciated.

tsuh yang chen, new york city

From: Hermine Stover <hermine at endangeredspecies.com> on 1997.01.18 at 13:18:56(169)
At 02:23 PM 1/17/97 -0600, you wrote:
> dear aroiders,
>
> i got two small zamioculcas at the philadelphia flower show last year.=
>
> can someone give me cultural tips for these guys? currently i have
> them in a north, cool window and they seem to be dormant, still green
> but not growing. does this plant require full sunlight?
>
> any help or advice would be appreciated.
>
> tsuh yang chen, new york city
>
>
>
AMAZING BUT TRUE! you can propagate this one from single leaves!
I grew mine in diffused aroid-type light, not bright. It is semi-succulent.
the leaves form bulblike things on the ends before rooting and putting yo
those fat stems. Mine were never below 55 degrees, but I see no reason woy
they could not be a NY windowsill plant, if kept from chilly nite temps.
Hermine

From: Timothy Chapman <chapman at premier.net> on 1997.01.19 at 10:27:47(177)
The Zamioculcas are very tough plants. I have the two forms
(subspecies?). and both have taken some abuse. Phil Mueller had said
they were hardy in New Orleans (zone 9), but haven't tried them here in
Zone 8. They can take very low temps, but freezing knocks them
dormant. I have one in a semi-heated shed that got down to 33F and it
showed no problems. So a window area should be fine, just don't expect
them to do too much growing in the winter.

I've sprouted a few by the leaves, but my experience is that they are
much slower to sprout then Gonatopsis leaves. But certainly worth they
wait.

Tim Chapman

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From: Piabinha at aol.com on 1999.02.05 at 17:35:05(3003)
many people in our local indoor gardening society are now growing Z.
zamiifolia, which has very nice rounded, thick leaves.

my plant which was bought at the philadelphia flower show a few years ago has
very pointed, long leaves. is this a different species or just a variation?
i was told that the genus was monotypic.

tsuh yang chen, nyc

From: "Peter Boyce" <Boyce at pothos.demon.co.uk> on 1999.02.06 at 08:45:10(3004)
The narrow-leaf form has been called Z. lancifolia but it's simply part of
Z. zamiifolia. The genus is monospecific.

Pete

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From: BRENT TUCKER <guyinmem at bellsouth.net> on 1999.05.02 at 14:20:43(3321)
Dear Aroiders,

I have recently purchased a plant of Zamioculcas zamiifolia from a
wholesale nursery. I was able to find a small amount of information
from Hortus Third, but would like to know more finer details. How
should I cultivate this plant properly? Thanks so much!

Brent Tucker

From: Michael Marcotrigiano <marcotrigiano at pssci.umass.edu> on 1999.05.03 at 15:10:11(3329)
I have grown it in a greehouse in fairly low light levels and found it to
burn in high light. My potting mix was Pro-Mix BX but I'm sure any highly
organic peat based mix will do. Keep in evenly moist and never let it dry out.
If a leaflet breaks off it has a strange propagation biology. You can plant
the leaflet. It will root and make a tuber-like swelling at the base which
eventually puts out a new shoot.

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From: Peter Wunderlin pmdes at iafrica.com> on 2001.08.03 at 07:08:28(7216)
Hi everybody,
I am looking for seeds or plants of Zamioculcas zamiifolia.
Please contact me at pmdes@iafrica.com
Many Thanks
Peter

From: Denis denis at skg.com> on 2001.08.04 at 14:45:28(7217)
Dear Peter:

I have never seen this plant make seeds. Zamioculcas has become a
tropical foliage plant in some of the commercial production nurseries
here in South florida. They use single leaflets stuck in liner trays to
regenerate whole plantlets. If you can't find plants or seeds get
someone to mail you some leaves.

Denis at Silver Krome Gardens
Homestead Florida

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