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  Philodendron with largest leaves?
From: The Silent Seed <tylus.seklos at gmail.com> on 2018.08.30 at 05:38:24(24014)
Has it ever been determined which has the title of largest-leaf Philodendron?

Hope everyone is O K! Been silent lately.

--

The Silent Seed

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From: Zach DuFran <zdufran at gmail.com> on 2018.08.30 at 05:58:56(24015)
I would guess that is was previously one of the species that has been moved to the genus Thaumatophyllum. I'm not sure what the next largest leaved Philodendron would be. Perhaps the aptly named Philodendron giganteum?

Zach

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From: The Silent Seed <tylus.seklos at gmail.com> on 2018.08.30 at 06:02:16(24016)
Zach,

Somebody recently indicated in this group that the move to Thaumatophyllum isn't fully supported - so I apologize for any confusion. I would mean to include Thaumatophyllum within my question. Is there one larger than P. giganteum?

Best, Jude

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From: Zach DuFran <zdufran at gmail.com> on 2018.08.30 at 07:21:31(24017)
I don't think anyone has suggested that the move is not fully supported. Someone may have said something to the effect of many people don't know about the move and are still using the former names. Here is the journal article recognizing the genus Thaumatophyllum: https://phytokeys.pensoft.net/articles.php?id=25044

I believe the largest Thaumatophyllum leaves are probably bipinnatifidum and speciosum. One source I found online just now mentioned bipinnatifidum leaves measuring as long as 120 cm.

Another Philodendron that can produce very large leaves is Philodendron warszewiczii.

Good luck on your quest to find the largest,

Zach

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From: The Silent Seed <tylus.seklos at gmail.com> on 2018.08.30 at 07:42:18(24018)
Zach,

I am referring to this message to this group some time ago that I copied and pasted below:

Thanks for your insights - I have several of these and can't wait for some hugeness.

Dylan: It is essentially obligatory if you except Thaumatophyllum.
Mike Grayum will not go along with the change and since he is the authority and is still finishing his revision of Pteromischum
it will be awkward for others to do so when the world’s authority on the group does not go along. I suspect that he will just go on calling them a section of Philodendron.

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From: Tom Croat <Thomas.Croat at mobot.org> on 2018.08.30 at 07:52:38(24019)
Leaves on Philodendron gigas Croat are up to 125 cm long and 90 cm wide, probably even larger since few specimens have been made.

Tom Croat

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From: Zach DuFran <zdufran at gmail.com> on 2018.08.30 at 08:13:09(24020)
Thanks Jude. I had forgotten about that message.

Zach

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From: The Silent Seed <tylus.seklos at gmail.com> on 2018.08.30 at 08:16:57(24021)
Thanks, Tom and Zach!

On Thu, Aug 30, 2018 at 11:13 AM, Zach DuFran wrote:

Thanks Jude. I had forgotten about that message.

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From: Peter Boyce <phymatarum at gmail.com> on 2018.08.30 at 23:38:30(24024)
Accepting (supporting) Thaumatophyllum as a genus is not simply a matter of agreeing that the species assigned to subgen. Meconostigma deserve to be recognized as belonging to a newly circumscribed Thaumatophyllum, there is also the question as to what removal of these species from the corpus of Philodendron leaves behind - i.e., does removal of Thaumatophyllum mean that the balance of Philodendron is no longer a 'natural' genus and to render it so requires further splitting. This may all sound very esoteric but in terms of understanding evolutionary process it is important stuff.

On Thu, 30 Aug 2018 at 22:27, Zach DuFran wrote:

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From: Ron Weeks <ronweeks518 at bellsouth.net> on 2018.10.25 at 17:31:22(24105)

My apology to all for not responding sooner. I was reluctant to
respond because of taxonomic work on this subject. Things changed
today after Enid quizzed me on the subject and I forwarded a photo
to her. The discussion she was engaged in was in a closed Facebook
page. Not only am I not a fan of Facebook. Closed Facebook pages
are even worse. My intent is to drag the discussion back to
aroid-l where it is available to all and a wonderful archive of
knowledge. Thank you Steve.

The attached photo is of a philodendron I collected in Ecuador in
1996. The plant in the photo was in more shade than most of my
plants and well fertilized.

On 8/30/18 8:38 AM, The Silent Seed

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From: "StroWi at t-online.de" <StroWi at t-online.de> on 2018.10.26 at 00:33:41(24107)

Like to read this, Ron !

Happy growing, Bernhard.

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From: "D. Christopher Rogers" <branchiopod at gmail.com> on 2018.10.26 at 06:30:48(24109)
Ron: I agree with you completely concerning Facebook. And it is good to "hear" from you again.

That plant is gorgeous. Do you have a good ID on it?

On Thu, 25 Oct 2018 at 19:44, Ron Weeks wrote:

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From: Rick Cohen <tm8ters4u at aol.com> on 2018.10.26 at 06:59:58(24110)
What about Philo giganteum? That baby has some huge leaves

cheers

RC

Miami

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From: Deni Bown <denibown at gmail.com> on 2018.10.26 at 07:15:10(24111)
Here here Ron – hope there is a good response to your comments. Aroid-l should be of more value to more folks for longer.

Deni

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From: Emily Colletti <Emily.Colletti at mobot.org> on 2018.10.29 at 06:36:00(24114)
Holy Hell …….that specimen is magnificent!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Emily Colletti Horticulturist Research/Aroid collections Missouri Botanical Garden 4344 Shaw Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63110 314-577-9527

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