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  plastic plant labels
From: Lester Kallus <lkallus at earthlink.net> on 1999.03.29 at 18:38:07(3165)
Garden centers frequently use plastic labels roughly 1/2 - 3/4 inch wide
and anywhere from 4 to 6 inches long with a pointed end on the bottom and a
rounded end on the top. I've managed to borrow them or recycle them. But
a local garden center is selling them for 3, 4 and 5 cents per label.

Something tells me I could do better than that.

Does anyone know of a source for purchasing a box of these?

Thanks.
Les

From: "Brian Cook" <bcook at interlog.com> on 1999.03.29 at 21:18:07(3170)
>Garden centers frequently use plastic labels roughly 1/2 - 3/4 .....
>Does anyone know of a source for purchasing a box of these?

Les, I asked at a few nurseries until I found one that would sell me a box
at their cost (about $17.00Can / 1000). I intend to try the following next
time.

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From: Joyce Miller <onager at midtown.net> on 1999.03.30 at 06:40:50(3171)
Dear Les,

A veteran horticulturist recommended using cut up metal venetian blinds for
labels and pencil. He also said he put an above ground label at once side
of the pot and a small buried label on the other side. Some of mind are
still legible after two seasons. Cheap too. Regards, Joyce Miller,
Sacramento CA Zone 9A

From: Mitsukiwi at aol.com on 1999.03.30 at 06:45:32(3172)
In a message dated 3/29/99 9:49:42 PM Eastern Standard Time,
lkallus@earthlink.net writes:

<<

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From: plantnut at macconnect.com (Dewey Fisk) on 1999.03.30 at 06:50:16(3173)
Lester,
Try Economy Label Sales, 1-800-874-4465, FAX 1-800-356-7650 or
. I get the ones that I use for about $22.00 per
thousand... Actually, when all is figured in... tax, freight, imprinting
and the whole 9 yards..... I pay $0.02453/each for mine... How's that for
being precise....???
Dewey

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From: Mike Bernardoni <mikeb at GlobalEyes.net> on 1999.03.30 at 06:57:19(3174)
Hi I can tell you something that I use and is alot cheaper..Those cheap vinyl
mini blinds for 3 or 4 dollars at the local Dollar or varitey store...cut off
the vinyl slats and cut to length..they work perfect and you can get maybe a
hundred or more labels for a few bucks!! I write on them with permanent
markers.....

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From: "George R Stilwell, Jr." <grsjr at juno.com> on 1999.03.30 at 14:49:13(3176)
Les,

Mellingers 1-800-321-7444 sells 4" x 5/8" white labels $20.85/1000 ~= 2
cents ea.

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From: Lester Kallus <lkallus at earthlink.net> on 1999.03.30 at 15:06:23(3179)
Thanks for the response but the labels I'm looking for would never go
through a printer. I suspect they're describing the labels that get
wrapped around a plant stem or trunk.

I'm looking for the solid hard plastic labels - they're rigid. Generally
they get stabbed into the soil. (But I sure do like the price you
mentioned! Furthermore, it's going to be at least a couple months before
I've accumulated 100 new plants.)
Les

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From: Regferns at aol.com on 1999.03.31 at 06:31:07(3180)
To all (especially South Floridians),

I purchase plastic labels from O.F.E. International, an orchid material
supplier. They'e got various types of plastic lables. O.F.E. does ship,
however, you must contact them for details.

Their phone numbers are: (305) 253-7080 and

Fax: (305) 251-8245

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From: Mike Bernardoni <mikeb at GlobalEyes.net> on 1999.03.31 at 06:39:07(3182)
Hi..I use cheap Vinyl venetian blinds from the discount store...hundreds of
labels for 3 or 4 dollars..I use a permanent marker..they work great...Mike
Bernardoni

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From: Sue <suez at northcoast.com> on 1999.03.31 at 06:49:17(3185)
Dear Les,

Even better than the metal blinds, are cream colored or white vinyl
blinds. They can be easily cut with sissors, are very tough, and after
you decide what size you need for large pots, you can cut them in half
for smaller pots, then in half lengthwise for tiny pots or for insertion
into Deno bags. This last mention, only after you've forgotten to write
contents on the bag, and it's too bulky to be done once full. These are
even cheaper than the metal ones. Very handy.

Sue Zunino

From: Jmh98law at aol.com on 1999.03.31 at 06:52:38(3186)
Hi Les,

Actually, I've ordered these labels in the past and they are rigid plastic. I
will look around to see if I can find any to send you a sample. [I don't
think they are as rigid as some I've purchased, from where I do not recall.]

I'll take another look at the A.M. Leonard catalog for you, too.

Jeanne

From: Lester Kallus <lkallus at earthlink.net> on 1999.03.31 at 06:55:51(3187)
Thanks all for the responses. I chose to go with the plastic labels though
the blinds idea did seem tempting. I'll be set for 1000 plants
shortly. That should keep me going for a short while. I'll ask again in
about 30 years in case I run out.
Les

From: Jmh98law at AOL.COM on 1999.03.31 at 07:03:23(3189)
Charley's Greenhouse in Mount Vernon WA and also at www.charleysgreenhouse.com
has various plant labels in the current catalog at pages 61 and 71.

They are plastic, and that may be why they are more expensive than those Brian
Cook was able to purchase. They vary in size, shape and color, and average
price is about $23/1000.

Jeanne Hannah

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From: Mitsukiwi at AOL.COM on 1999.03.31 at 07:06:46(3190)
In a message dated 3/30/99 6:05:54 PM Eastern Standard Time,
lkallus@earthlink.net writes:

<<

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From: "James W. Waddick" <jim-jim at swbell.net> on 1999.03.31 at 07:10:15(3191)
>Garden centers frequently use plastic labels roughly 1/2 - 3/4 inch wide
>Does anyone know of a source for purchasing a box of these?

Dear Les;
I just purchased a box of 1,000 5/8 x 6 inch plastic labels for $33

1,00 4 inch labels cost about $22.

I use the six inch labels because I can always cut them in half for
small pots and I reuse them when possible.

I get these at a wholesale price thanks to a local garden group
with an account at a local wholesale supplier. I think you can get similar
labels from Mellingers in lima Ohio (and probably on the web, too).

It is very handy when I need a handfull of labels.

best Jim W.

James W. Waddick Voice: 816 746 1949
8871 NW Brostrom Rd E-MAIL: jim-jim@swbell.net
Kansas City MO 64152 Fax: 816 746 1939
Zone 5/6 - Winter low -10 degrees F Summer high +100 degrees F

From: judy <jbauer at concordnc.com> on 1999.03.31 at 07:13:53(3192)
I have bought the plastic stick-in-the ground plant labels at a local nursey for
.02 each. But eventually these crumble or break very easy. Also the magic maker
eventually fades on these. I have used ventian blinds but the magic maker writing
fades on these also. The plastic markers would probably do very well inside a
greenhouse but outdoors the look like little mouse grave markers. I have used the
zinc metal markers but the metal legs rust plus the special paint I used that was
suppose to last didn't. I tried engraving the metal markers but that is hard to
read. Also it is very cumbersome and time consuming. Markers in pencil has not
lasted outdoors either.
+More
From: "Brian Cook" <bcook at interlog.com> on 1999.03.31 at 07:17:35(3193)
>Thanks for the response but the labels I'm looking for would never go
>through a printer. I suspect they're describing the labels that get
>wrapped around a plant stem or trunk.

They have those too Les, regular old stickem in a pot kind. With the US
exchange rate now 0.50us=!.00can you would make a killing.

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From: "Walter Greenwood" <walter at radserv.arad.upmc.edu> on 1999.03.31 at 08:46:41(3195)
Judy wrote about the imperfections of all these options we've been batting around.
This reminded me of an old friend of mine who used to be one of the greatest
Nepenthes growers this side of Kalimantan. His labels were all in his head. He
could pick up each unlabeled pot in his greenhouse and identify it by species,
cultivar, mountain range & acre of origin, name of collector, year of collection,
accession number at this or that botanic garden, cultivation minutiae, and probably
the maiden name of the mother of the USDA inspector who admitted it into the
country. Which in turn reminded me of something Stan Getz said: "All my life I've
been trying to find the mouthpiece. You look for the rainbow in the sky but you
never find it. ... It's not the mouthpiece, it's you. It's in your head." As for me
I need labels, and I'm stopping at the Dollar Store tonight.

- Walter G.

From: "George R Stilwell, Jr." <grsjr at juno.com> on 1999.03.31 at 08:51:41(3196)
Les & Jeanne,

Leonard's labels are expensive.

Mellinger's labels are typical pot labels for insertion in the media.

Les, you'll be surprised how quickly 1000 labels get used up.
I thought I'd never need to buy them again when I got my first box.
I'm now working on the third box.

Ray

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From: "George R Stilwell, Jr." <grsjr at juno.com> on 1999.03.31 at 08:59:41(3197)
Judy,

There are labels and there are labels.
On the one hand quick and convenient and cheap for marking seedlings,
etc.

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From: goroff at idcnet.com (Iza & Carol Goroff) on 1999.03.31 at 09:03:58(3198)
There are two distinct classes of labels:

1 Those which are made by the 1,000s for nursery sales.

2 Those which are for garden use.

Nursery sales labels are cheap and impermanent. Garden labels should be
permanent, and, of necessity, cannot be cheap. Those labels which are
intended for garden use should, in addtion, be

1 legible

2 inconspicuous

Thes two additional requirements would seem to be contradictory. However,
the labels I make satisfy both permanence, and legibility, and are almost
inconspicuous. You can see a sample of an old label of this type on the
North American Rock Garden Society site at

http://www.nargs.org/potm/potm_may98.html

These labels are printed, using a laser printer on sheets of self adhesive
mylar, the kind used for encapsulating photos or cards. I do a 1/2 sheet of
labels, about 30 to a 1/2 sheet at a time. The other 1/2 sheet is used to
cover the printing. The backing is removed, the labels cut apart, and
attached to polycarbonate 1/8" thick 5/8" X 7" sticks with one end cut at
a 45 degree angle. I used to use acrylic, but they break under the weight
of a foot; the polycarbonate does not. The labels outlast the plant, but
the sticks are recyclabel.

I have used most of the label techniques described in the past: dymo
tapes: they do not stick consistently and the pigments fade, plastic hand
written labels - they break and the writing disappears (except under UV
light), ... .

The names for the plants I label come from seeds or plants on oders, all of
which I prepare, using the computer. By cutting and pasting one need not
type the names a second time. When an order arrives, I check to see what
actually came, and print the labels a few minutes later. The preparation
time/label is about 2 minutes. The cost is about 50 cents/label. What one
gets in exchange is a label which lasts over 10 years.

Iza Goroff

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From: Stacy Holtzman <sholtzma at sunflower.bio.indiana.edu> on 1999.03.31 at 11:08:23(3200)
I have used the
>zinc metal markers but the metal legs rust plus the special paint I used
>that was
>suppose to last didn't. I tried engraving the metal markers but that is
>hard to
>read. Also it is very cumbersome and time consuming. Markers in pencil has not
>lasted outdoors either.

Judy,
what we are doing this spring, that you might be able to do if you find a
local trophy shop, is to get a special laser to "burn" the names onto the
metal. This is the latest technology for engraving, and is really great!
It is just a big laser, with software that treats it just like a printer.
We know a person at a trophy shop that is going to burn copper tags that we
will then hang on little copper stakes, that should last forever. The
only thing is, I don't know how much it would cost to get a trophy shop to
do it.
Stacy

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From: "George R Stilwell, Jr." <grsjr at juno.com> on 1999.03.31 at 11:51:16(3201)
Isa,

Where do you get the self adhesive mylar and the polycarbonate 1/8" thick
5/8" X 7" sticks?
Source and part numbers if possible, please.

How do you cover the printing? Stick the two halves of a sheet together?

Ray

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From: "George R Stilwell, Jr." <grsjr at juno.com> on 1999.03.31 at 11:56:20(3202)
If only I could play like Stan Getz did, I'd forgo the label memory.

He also said, "Less is more". So there you are, no labels.

Ray

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From: goroff at idcnet.com (Iza & Carol Goroff) on 1999.03.31 at 12:42:39(3205)
Ray:

>Where do you get the self adhesive mylar and the polycarbonate 1/8" thick
> 5/8" X 7" sticks?
>Source and part numbers if possible, please.

The mylar is Cleer-Adheer Clear Laminating Sheets No. 65001 which I buy in
boxes of 50 for around $25. The sticks are either ones I cut or which I
farm out to aplastics company. I am now looking for a local company to do
it. I don't have a favorite polycarbonate plastic brand. I suggest that if
you wish to do this, you look around for a local company to do it. Normally
if you ask the company to do it as a baskground job, you can get a better
price. Some years ago (~7?) the price of acrylic labels, including both
material and cutting was $0.30. Polycarbonate will probably cost double
that. These plastics come in 4' X 8' sheets. I am about to get a full
sheet's worth of label sticks.

>How do you cover the printing? Stick the two halves of a sheet together?

yes

In my recent labels, much nicer than the one for Genista dalmatica, and
taking advantage of the much wider array of fonts than were available 15
years ago, I now use 18point Helvetica or Arial for the plant name and 9
point for the source and date of planting.

Iza

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From: goroff at idcnet.com (Iza & Carol Goroff) on 1999.03.31 at 12:47:33(3206)
Ray:

>Where do you get the self adhesive mylar and the polycarbonate 1/8" thick
> 5/8" X 7" sticks?
>Source and part numbers if possible, please.

The mylar is Cleer-Adheer Clear Laminating Sheets No. 65001 which I buy in
boxes of 50 for around $25. The sticks are either ones I cut or which I
farm out to aplastics company. I am now looking for a local company to do
it. I don't have a favorite polycarbonate plastic brand. I suggest that if
you wish to do this, you look around for a local company to do it. Normally
if you ask the company to do it as a baskground job, you can get a better
price. Some years ago (~7?) the price of acrylic labels, including both
material and cutting was $0.30. Polycarbonate will probably cost double
that. These plastics come in 4' X 8' sheets. I am about to get a full
sheet's worth of label sticks.

>How do you cover the printing? Stick the two halves of a sheet together?

yes

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From: "Walter Greenwood" <walter at radserv.arad.upmc.edu> on 1999.03.31 at 13:42:57(3208)
"George R Stilwell, Jr." wrote:

> If only I could play like Stan Getz did, I'd forgo the label memory.

Amen, Brother. I used to say I'd give my left arm to be able to play stride
piano, but then again... I honestly can't imagine what I'd give up to play
like Getz. I guess I'd have to stop short of being a drunken wife beater,
like he unfortunately was for a lot of his life, but then again ... hmm,
that's a toughie. ;-)

- WG

From: "George R Stilwell, Jr." <grsjr at juno.com> on 1999.04.01 at 06:28:13(3212)
Iza,

OK! Cleer-Adheer Clear Laminating Sheets No. 65001. But my photo store
doesn't have them. Where do you order them?

Ray

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