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  Aroids in Art
From: "Petra Schmidt Malesevich" pmalesevich at LEHMANN.MOBOT.ORG> on 2000.09.12 at 07:39:21(5419)
I went to an art fair over the weekend and found a woman using
Arisaema in her art. Check out: http://www.vermontbotanical.com

The plants were dried at very high heat, then freeze-dried, a
process that holds the color true. She has a "thing" for fiddleheads
of ferns and incorporated them into almost of her Arisaema art
which was a bit irritating to see (botanically incorrect) but, hey, it's
art, and she's the artist, and the work is interesting.

Has anyone else ever seen dried plants (aroids) or know of a
process that holds true natural colors intact?

Petra

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From: mossytrail at hctc.com (mossytrail) on 2007.11.20 at 11:14:42(16707)
I was recently in an antiques store, where there was a whole
section of art prints reproduced from old books, calendars,
advertising, etc. In the category, "Fairies and Flower
People," there were prints of illustrated pages from
19th-century children's books. I found one such page
depicting lords-and-ladies (Arum maculatum), personified as
(surprise, surprise) a lord and a lady. Their clothing was
made entirely of the spathes -- a flowing tunic for the
lord, a hooded gown for the lady. The lord also carried a
spear which was really an inflorescence with protruding
spadix, and another spadix formed the "feather" of his
Robin-hood style hat. Berry clusters dangled from their
belts. That is certainly a very clever way to depict
aroids.

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From: hermine at endangeredspecies.com (hermine) on 2007.11.20 at 12:51:23(16708)
For a wee moment i recalled the fabrics used in interiors of the
forties, and the wallpaper, which is probably where i first saw a
monstera with huge dissected leaves and swiss cheese holes. I know
without doubt it was the first place i saw a common red
anthurium. now that I have a large collection of Hawaiian shirts, i
realize there is tons of botanical information on the fabric in the
form of textile design.

hermine

From: abri1973 at wp.pl (Marek Argent) on 2007.11.20 at 15:26:15(16709)
You could take a photo...

Marek Argent

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From: mossytrail at hctc.com (mossytrail) on 2007.11.23 at 12:13:55(16713)
> Date: Wed, 21 Nov 2007 00:26:15 +0100
> From: "Marek Argent"
> Subject: Re: [Aroid-l] Aroids in Art
> To: "Discussion of aroids"
> Message-ID: <01b701c82bce$4f550b50$0b01a8c0 at vaasgard>
> Content-Type: text/plain; format=flowed;
> charset="iso-8859-1";
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From: ju-bo at msn.com (ju-bo at msn.com) on 2007.11.24 at 05:08:03(16715)
Dear Jason,

Thank you so very much for going to the trouble of getting a photo of the artwork on line so that those of us who have an interest in this sort of ''aroids in art'' can view it---I KNOW that Deni Bown, Steve Marak and several others are also thanking you!
What an interesting use of the ''Lorda and Ladies"' legend and motifs! I was also struck by the fact that even the hooded hunting falconet of the right hand of the lady also had its feathers made/drawn of the same ''material'' as the garb of the humans, seemingly Arum leaves!
Thanks again, Jason!
Sincerely,

Julius

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From: hermine at endangeredspecies.com (hermine) on 2007.11.25 at 02:50:24(16723)
>
>What an interesting use of the ''Lorda and Ladies"' legend and
>motifs! I was also struck by the fact that even the hooded hunting
>falconet of the right hand of the lady also had its feathers
>made/drawn of the same ''material'' as the garb of the humans,
>seemingly Arum leaves!
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From: botanist at malesiana.com (Peter Boyce) on 2007.11.25 at 14:51:47(16726)
Hi Hermine... not all... BUT Arum maculatum is in European folklore very
much associated with human (and other mammalian) sexuality; most of the
common names (Lords & Ladies, Cuckoo Pint, Dog's Dibble, Wake Robin, and so
forth) are laced with sexual innuendo.

Peter

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From: hermine at endangeredspecies.com (hermine) on 2007.11.25 at 19:47:34(16729)
At 02:51 PM 11/25/2007, you wrote:
>Hi Hermine... not all... BUT Arum maculatum is in European folklore very
>much associated with human (and other mammalian) sexuality; most of the
>common names (Lords & Ladies, Cuckoo Pint, Dog's Dibble, Wake Robin, and so
>forth) are laced with sexual innuendo.

as a wee tot, i thought this stuff, those pictures, were really like,
in the FORBIDDEN category, but my parents never noticed. So much
embedded passion in art, poetry. I liked that, rather than adverts
for blue tablets and the description of what they do and what are the
bad side effects. Innuendo leaves room for your personal imagination
to fill in the blanks with HOT SAUCE.

hermine

From: botanist at malesiana.com (Peter Boyce) on 2007.11.25 at 21:27:06(16731)
Hi Hermine.... Hot sauce means cili padi and cili api here in Malaysia; none
hotter lah!

----- Original Message -----

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From: gcyao at mydestiny.net (George Yao) on 2007.11.25 at 21:43:48(16732)
Julius and Jason,

If you look closely at the shoes, they are also aroid inflorescences!
The hat seems to be an inflorescence too, not just a spadix stuck into it.

George Yao

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From: botanist at malesiana.com (Peter Boyce) on 2007.11.25 at 21:51:12(16733)
reminds me of a school trip to the Wallace Collection, where the sumptuous
paintings by Fragonard left me (then about 13) with my mouth open but which
no-one else seemed to see as the least erotic...

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From: fieldmycol at yahoo.co.uk (Geoffrey Kibby) on 2007.11.26 at 14:49:47(16744)
Hi everyone,

Further to the many emails about this fascinating piece of artwork you
might like to know that most of these flower prints including the
Lords and Ladies print (all part of a series called "Floras Feast" by
the famous Victorian artist Walter Crane) are currently available
individually on eBay at moderate prices (search for Walter Crane under
Arts/antiques).

Or you can purchase a modern reproduction of the whole series (40
prints) in paperback book form from Amazon for the bargain price of
$5.37 plus postage!! It is published by Dover Books.
Flora's Feast: A Fairy's Festival of Flowers (Paperback)
http://www.amazon.com/Floras-Feast-Fairys-Festival-Flowers/dp/0486418588

Regards,
Geoffrey Kibby

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From: Deni at yaxhampark.co.uk (Deni Bown) on 2007.11.27 at 10:22:33(16751)
Dear Jason,

Julius is right that Deni Bown is thanking you for sharing the
delightful illustration of 'lords & ladies', and here she is doing it in
person! Many thanks indeed!

The accompanying discussion took me back to my earliest aroid days when
in my frantic search to find anything written on the family, I came
across Cecil Prime's "Lords and Ladies". This wonderful book was first
published in 1960 as a special volume in the New Naturalist series. It
was out of print when I first started ferreting out information on
aroids for my own book, but with perfect timing Dr Prime's widow,
Frances, had it reprinted in 1981 and I obtained a copy from her. The
second chapter is devoted to the numerous names for this intriguing
plant and is well worth reading. Have a read too of the final paragraph
of this very special book, which so well combines scientific monograph
with imagination and humour. I quote Dr Prime:

"May I end with a picture of an Aroid which despite all the
multitudinous variations of the family, nature has not yet evolved? It
is Armchairia Comfortabilis, and it was figured by Edward Lear in his
Laughable Lyrics (1877). It has an obvious and well developed spathe,
and an extremely complicated spadix which consists of a hollowed
receptacle above, lined with tri-radiate markings and bearing in front a
conspicuously serrate margin."

Hopefully there is someone out there who has the technological know-how,
and access to a copy of Dr Prime's book or The Complete Nonsense of
Edward Lear, who could put this drawing of an armchair arum in a
Photobucket to delight us all further?

Thanks again Jason,

Araceously,

Deni Bown

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From: ju-bo at msn.com (ju-bo at msn.com) on 2007.11.28 at 03:32:58(16755)
From: aroid-l-bounces at gizmoworks.com on behalf of hermine (hermine at endangeredspecies.com)
Sent: Sun 11/25/07 5:20 PM
Reply-to: Discussion of aroids (aroid-l at gizmoworks.com)
To: Discussion of aroids (aroid-l at gizmoworks.com); Discussion of aroids (aroid-l at gizmoworks.com)

Dear Deni and Friends,

I am posting the note (below) which I had sent to Hermine off-l, she claims that it contains enough ''scholarly'' and important information that it NEEDS to be on aroid-l, so here goes, and to any prudes ''out there'', bring on the heat!!
Deni, I certainly do hope that someone can find a way to post the illustration from Edward Lear`s book of silly limricks, or that you can find a way to scan it from your copy for our viewing pleasure. What an interesting topic!
Geoff, thanks for the tip on the availabilty of that book of victorian illustrations.
There is a copy of one of these modern comic books 'out there' in which in the wonderfully artistic illustrations done in beautiful color, the art depicts an alien ''being'' who is drawn as a VERY recognisable bloom belonging to the Araceae, and who seduces a beautiful young woman!! I sent copies to a collector of aroid art some years ago!

The Best,

Julius

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From: hermine at endangeredspecies.com (hermine) on 2007.11.28 at 09:55:56(16756)
At 03:32 AM 11/28/2007, you wrote:

> From: aroid-l-bounces at gizmoworks.com on behalf of hermine
> (hermine at endangeredspecies.com)
> Sent: Sun 11/25/07 5:20 PM
> Reply-to: Discussion of aroids (aroid-l at gizmoworks.com)
> To: Discussion of aroids (aroid-l at gizmoworks.com); Discussion
> of aroids (aroid-l at gizmoworks.com)
>
>
>Dear Deni and Friends,
>
>I am posting the note (below) which I had sent to Hermine off-l, she
>claims that it contains enough ''scholarly'' and important
>information that it NEEDS to be on aroid-l, so here goes, and to any
>prudes ''out there'', bring on the heat!!

Artists are used to such things and dont spazz over them. years of
drawing naked people kind of dulls whatever it is which makes it a
BIG DEAL for civilians. Much art is terribly hot and were it not in
a museum with a big frame around it, could do time as playboy
centerfolds. Ceptin how those ladies are not skinny enough for today,
and have actual "FLESH" and no implants. Especially when the
renaissance came in and paintings in europe stopped being bible stories.

THE NAKED MAJA was such a big deal the postmaster general banned it
here for use in a postage stamp celebrating the works of GOYA.

I like it when that happens, a whole generation noticed GOYA because of that!

Back to our scheduled examination of the private parts of plants,
which is really the basis for taxonomy yes no?

hermine

From: harrywitmore at witmore.net (Harry Witmore) on 2007.11.29 at 04:33:41(16761)
There is this painting of an Arum itlacum with a Typhonium venosum peeked
out before the Arum goes dormant. I think this done by the infamous 20th
Century artist H Witmore.
http://www.cloudjungle.com/cloudjungle/Artwork/pansy.jpg

Just kidding!

Harry Witmore

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From: mossytrail at hctc.com (mossytrail) on 2007.11.29 at 18:41:02(16764)
> Message: 1
> Date: Wed, 28 Nov 2007 09:55:56 -0800
> From: hermine
> Subject: Re: [Aroid-l] [SPAM] FW: RE: Aroids in Art
> To: Discussion of aroids
> Message-ID: <20071128125704.GA44614 at mail11c.verio-web.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii";
> format=flowed
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