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  The sixth sense
From: "brian williams" pugturd50 at hotmail.com> on 2002.01.31 at 19:55:07(8112)
OK well I know this subject can easily become a religious and scientific
battle field. Hopefully it be like most arguments on here and stay in hand.

One of the other things I have seen that really amazed me was a science
experiment were a group of plant were in an aquarium with a speaker. One
tank had hard rock playing the other had instrumental music. Apparently the
volumes to both speakers were at the same tone and the plants were in all
the same conditions. Now the plants in the rock and roll tank moved away
from the speaker and started to die. The other plants with the orchestra
music moved towards the speaker and looked very healthy. Is this proof
plants can hear? Hearing is only picking up vibrations in a sense? does this
prove plants have a specific taste in music?:>)

I for one do not totally believe in evolution their are a lot of holes in
that bucket. Of course I think it's for some the only way to answer. Try
not to attack to harsh LOL!

Still has anyone really studied these thing or is it all just theories? That
little aquarium experiment was the only one I have heard of. It was also the
last I heard about it.

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From: Neil Carroll zzamia at hargray.com> on 2002.02.01 at 07:02:28(8119)
I for one do not totally believe in evolution their are a lot of holes in
that bucket. Of course I think it's for some the only way to answer. Try
not to attack to harsh LOL!

No attack here, but natural selection is a very real thing......not a
theory.

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From: "Michael Pascall" mickpascall at hotmail.com> on 2002.02.01 at 13:11:50(8124)
I have heard of experiments done in India with Sitar music . The plants
really grew well with that sort of laid back music .

Michael Pascall,
WHYANBEEL ARBORETUM,F.N.Q,AUSTRALIA

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From: Jonathan Ertelt jonathan.ertelt at vanderbilt.edu> on 2002.02.01 at 20:48:18(8128)
>I have heard of experiments done in India with Sitar music . The plants
>really grew well with that sort of laid back music .
>
Although I would like to believe in all sorts of levels of
understanding on the part of plants (anyone familiar with the Findhorn
Garden community?!), the bottom line regarding all the experiments that
I've heard about, from playing music to butchering plants and taking
readings on the plants right next to them, none of the experiments are
repeatable with any success, leading to questioning of their reliability.

Another point to make is that we are so inclined to anthropomorphize (sp?)
about plants, as well as to overinterpret or to slant the interpretation in
"favor" of our preconceived interpretations - the most recent experimenting
I heard about involved someone setting up an audible response based on
ethylene production, saying that ethylene production increased with plant
stress or something to that effect. Now, the audible response sounded very
much like screaming in agony kind of sound. If, as another pointed out on
another list serve, the audible response had been more along the lines of
"yes, Yes, oh yes Yes YES" our interpretation of the plant's "suffering"
might be entirely different.

Natural selection and all has been covered very nicely by others, so
there's no need for me to reiterate thopse very valid points. The only
aspect perhaps not strongly enough stated is how random the mutations or
changes are - and then, with time, lots of time,natural selection (or
unnatural selection, in the case of the helmeted crabs) goes for that which
works best. The others lose out, die off, leaving only those plants, or any
other organisms which "know their surroundings best" surviving to be
effectively pollinated, not eaten by predators, dispersing their seed well,
propagating best vegetatively or asexually, or whatever.

Jonathan

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From: "Ron Iles" roniles at eircom.net> on 2002.02.01 at 20:48:52(8131)
Just woke. Is it Happy Hour? This is wacky.. Natural Selection? How
about Super-natural
Selection. It's easy to guess what maybe some of you'd like me to be but
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From: "brian williams" pugturd50 at hotmail.com> on 2002.02.02 at 08:24:49(8136)
I believe in survival of the fittest. But I do not believe that it brings on
genetic changes. I agree plants adapt to the conditions take a certain plant
and put it in the sun they will usually have smaller leafs than ones in the
shade. But switch conditions and they turn back. Not genetic change just
adjusting to conditions. Now these things I can take in and believe.
Believing that they can turn into new species is hard to take. Besides were
are all the subspecies? If you have a saber tooth tiger you must have
thousands of bones of the tigers with medium size teeth. That turned into
the present day tiger? The fact is they have one or the other no in-between
mutations.

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From: Cgdz33a at aol.com on 2002.02.02 at 10:58:35(8140)
Evolution does not bring about genetic change. Mutation does, and selection
acts upon those mutations to cause evolution which is simply change in an
organism over time. Anyone who doubts that evolution can work either fast or
slow please explain the resistance to pesticides by insects or the resistance
of microbes to antibiotics this can occur in relatively few generations
(short generations). As for the coelacanth, mant succesful organisms do not
change over time ie. horseshoe crabs. But "speciation" leads to other other
species breaking off from a give lineage for a variety of reasons such as
isolation, climate change, etc.

Eric C. Morgan (studying heterochrony in the Araceae)
Director

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From: Neil Carroll zzamia at hargray.com> on 2002.02.02 at 11:00:24(8145)
>
>I believe in survival of the fittest. But I do not believe that it brings
on
>genetic changes. I agree plants adapt to the conditions take a certain
plant
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From: Alektra at aol.com on 2002.02.03 at 08:42:33(8155)
I think it was discussed on this very forum, a few months ago, Dr. Frank
Brown's discovery of a hybrid swarm of aglaonemas in the Philippines, where
speciation was indistinct.

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