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  2 things
From: "MJ Hatfield" mjhatfield at oneota.org> on 2002.03.24 at 22:03:53(8345)
Has anyone observed skunk cabbage, Symplocarpus, flowers
in the wild, over a period of time.

Every year mine get eaten but not entirely.

The spathe gets torn apart and what appears, spit out,
in pieces. I started putting tomato cages around the
flowers which has worked in the past but this year,
whatever was still able to get to one flower.

Just curious if anyone else has observed this.

Second, I will soon have seeds of Anthurium purpureospathum
available. They germinate and grow very easily. If anyone
would like some, let me know. The plant gets pretty big
but the foliage is nice looking hanging off of a balcony.
I can send jpg if you'd like.

MJ Hatfield

From: Susan Cox snalice at cnmnetwork.com> on 2002.03.25 at 08:09:57(8347)
Hi MJ,

I can't say for Symplocarpus, but I have noticed the same with
Lycichiton americanum. I found the infructescense torn apart the same
way. The only thing I could think of were either skunk, coon or bear.
Bear have been known to survive on skunk cabbage when there is little
else to eat, however I would think they would be eating on other parts
of the plant as I think they usually have less to eat when skunk cabbage
is not in infructescence, but is in leaf. Still, is it possible they
might like to nibble at the time of the cabbage's fruiting? As for
skunk and coon, those are the only other animals (besides deer) that are
around here that would be of a size that could tear into the
infructescence. Perhaps deer? I hadn't thought of that before. They
are not easy to get into at that stage. Do you have deer? Do you have
any of these animals around? These four animals frequent my sister's
property where the cabbages grow. This is just a big guess because I
didn't catch the animal in the act. It's your turn to stay up all night
to find out. Be sure and take a flashlight....and

Let me know,
Sue Cox

From: Susan Cox snalice at cnmnetwork.com> on 2002.03.25 at 08:11:29(8348)
MJ,

I just noticed that you were referring to the 'spathe' of Symplocarpus.
I have not seen this happen.

Sue

From: Durightmm at aol.com on 2002.03.25 at 12:25:18(8359)
I am not surre which is worse inflorescense eating animails or the annoying and perplexing plows who search for morsels deep in beds. The Texas armordilla is notorious here for disrupting a bed and all potted plants that might unfortunately be stting on the ground. Wire fences are an answere but when you have many beds it can be a chore. We know the culprit here but there is little one can do except wait out the rite of spring.!! Joe

From: "MJ Hatfield" <mjhatfield at oneota.org> on 2004.02.04 at 13:15:37(11073)
Who would ever guess that that little inflorescence on Typhonium
violaefolium could smell up and entire room? And once again, it caught me. I
first went looking for a tree frog that somehow showed up in the sunspace
this winter. I assumed it had died.

And a question; how should Spathantheum fallax be stored during dormancy?

Thanks,
MJ Hatfield

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From: "Wilbert Hetterscheid (prive)" <hetter at worldonline.nl> on 2004.02.06 at 07:50:03(11094)
And who do you think knows about storing Spathantheum fallax on
aroid-l.........said a person arrogantly.......

But maybe I can help: you can store it dry and cool, NOT warm. It will poke
its nose up around now each year.

Glad you caught T. violiaefolium smelling. There are those who claim it has
no scent at all. Go figure!

Lord P

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From: "MJ Hatfield" <mjhatfield at oneota.org> on 2004.02.06 at 20:22:10(11108)
Thanks Lord P,
As to the Spathantheum fallax dormancy storage; how cool is cool?
Refrigerator cool (38F), garage cool (45F) or basement cool (60F)?
(Certainly not winter cool -2F) And since it just recently went dormant it
may be a bit before it starts to grow again.

MJ

From: "Wilbert Hetterscheid (prive)" <hetter at worldonline.nl> on 2004.02.07 at 20:24:01(11112)
> Thanks Lord P,
> As to the Spathantheum fallax dormancy storage; how cool is cool?
> Refrigerator cool (38F), garage cool (45F) or basement cool (60F)?
> (Certainly not winter cool -2F) And since it just recently
> went dormant it
> may be a bit before it starts to grow again.

I could answer this if you wouldn't use the darn middle-age Fahrenheit,
milady!

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