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  Dead Horses?
From: "James W. Waddick" jwaddick at kc.rr.com> on 2002.04.19 at 12:04:20(8578)
Dear all;
Way back in Jan 1997, Rob McClure ( I believe)donated and
with the help of Mary Sizemore ?? arranged for a distribution of
small tubers of Helicodiceros musciverous. My old mail shows delivery
went to 15 in the US and a few more in other countries.
Last year I prompted some email as I unpotted my plant and
sent out a few small tubers. I repotted the biggest and kept it frost
free in a greenhouse.

I am expecting bloom for the first time. The very strangely
shaped 'bent-horn' of the tightly rolled spathe is emerging and about
8 inches long on top of the foliage.

Should I invite or warn my neighbors?

Also curious if any of the other 15++ have had bloom or the
others? Is mine the first to pop?

Best Jim W.

Dr. James W. Waddick
8871 NW Brostrom Rd.
Kansas City Missouri 64152-2711
USA

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From: "Peter Boyce" boyce at pothos.demon.co.uk> on 2002.04.19 at 13:07:51(8579)
Warn!! It's possibly the worst-smelling of all the aroids (with the possible
exception of Synandrospadix and Typhonium venosum).

----- Original Message -----

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From: "Alan Galloway" alan_galloway at bellsouth.net> on 2002.04.21 at 19:47:19(8581)
> Way back in Jan 1997, Rob McClure ( I believe)donated
> small tubers of Helicodiceros musciverous. My old mail shows delivery
> went to 15 in the US and a few more in other countries.
> Also curious if any of the other 15++ have had bloom or the
> others? Is mine the first to pop?
>

Jim,
I also was a lucky recipient of Rob's distribution. Mine flowered
last year for the first time. I had 2 blooms last year and currently
have 2 in bloom now with 6 more that should open in the next
few days.

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From: Alektra at aol.com on 2002.04.21 at 19:50:22(8583)
Very sorry about the accidental quote-only mail I just sent...

I was only going to comment briefly that the species name "musciverous"
suggests the meaning "musky"... and if an aroid smells strongly enough to be
called musky in contrast to other aroids, well...

I'm not good enough with my Latin to know if that really IS what it means
(lots of people have made mistakes with plausible etymologies before, and I'm
one of them), but it certainly sounds plausible.

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From: "Julius Boos" ju-bo at msn.com> on 2002.04.21 at 19:53:26(8585)
Dear Jim,

Watch out for flocks of vultures circling over your home, hoards of large
flesh-flies enveloping your entire green-house, and crowds of caped and
hooded neighbors with torches, clubs and pitch-forks screaming at and
beating down your door! :--)

Keep us informed of YOUR impressions of this weed-of-satans smell!!

Julius

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From: Paul Tyerman ptyerman at ozemail.com.au> on 2002.04.21 at 19:54:58(8586)
Jim,

>
> I am expecting bloom for the first time. The very strangely
>shaped 'bent-horn' of the tightly rolled spathe is emerging and about
>8 inches long on top of the foliage.

Once the bent horn is below horizontal it usually opens for me, not before.
I have had it flower for me two successive years. Absolutely stunning in
flower. I sent pics to the IBS-Images list last year I think and can do so
again if you'd like?

>
> Should I invite or warn my neighbors?

I have been told that this is one of the worst smells of all the Aroids,
yet mine is almost completely unscented. I have literally stuck my nose
into it as I could not smell anyting. With my nose in it there was a faint
smell. Not even a patch compared to Dracunculus vulgaris which pongs for
metres and metres around (even though this was originally Dracunulus
muscivorus then renamed to Helicodicerus as far as I know). So.... whether
you have one that stinks or not may depend on either climate or genetics as
mine has not had any pong at all either year.

Obviously mine has not been reading the literature to know that it is
supposed to stink.... and I am CERTAINLY not going to be taking a book out
there and teaching it .

Good luck with it. Very dramatic flower when open, but unfortunately
doesn't last for long.

Cheers.

Paul Tyerman

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From: Don Martinson llmen at wi.rr.com> on 2002.04.22 at 08:30:04(8588)
>Very sorry about the accidental quote-only mail I just sent...
>
>I was only going to comment briefly that the species name "musciverous"
>suggests the meaning "musky"...
>
>I'm not good enough with my Latin to know if that really IS what it means
>(lots of people have made mistakes with plausible etymologies before, and I'm
>one of them), but it certainly sounds plausible.
>

Actually, the word musca (singular), -ae (plural), being the Latin
for fly, I would guess that the name might suggest being attractive
to flies. I can't say specifically about Helicodiceros, but for
many of these, the smell is beyond musky.

--
Don Martinson

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From: GeoffAroid at aol.com on 2002.04.22 at 08:31:36(8589)
James,
The Latin name musciverous actually means "fly-eating" from the Latin name of
the common house fly Musca. The Smell is certainly very attractive to house
flies and others even though it doesnt actually eat them. The purpose of
course is to use the flies as pollinators and the ruse works so successfully
that it is common to find fly eggs and even larvae in such flowers (I have
seen the same thing in the large starfish flowers of the succulent Stapelia).
So....no musk I am afraid.

Regards,
Geoffrey Kibby

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