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  variegated
From: "Michael Marcotrigiano" <mmarcotr at email.smith.edu> on 2004.08.23 at 09:20:48(12041)
For those of you who were asking I decided to sell a few of my
variegated Amorphophallus plants (A. konjac 'Shattered Glass'). There is
one on ebay right now.

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From: Neil Gordon <neil at ng23.abelgratis.co.uk> on 2004.08.23 at 10:08:53(12043)
On 23 Aug 2004, at 17:20, Michael Marcotrigiano wrote:

For those of you who were asking I decided to sell a few of my
variegated Amorphophallus plants (A. konjac 'Shattered Glass'). There
is
one on ebay right now.

Looks like the A Bulbifer leaf I left out in the full sun a few weeks
ago!

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From: "Michael Marcotrigiano" <mmarcotr at email.smith.edu> on 2004.08.23 at 10:29:04(12044)
Neil

I guess people like that look. The last one I sold last year went for
475.00. If you take the time to read the web link you will see that they
grow into very stunning variegated leaves - if you don't like
variegation so be it -- but for those who do, this is the aroid holy
grail. I bought a parrot with the profits fromt he last one. One hobby
fuels another.

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From: "Temmerman" <temmerm at skynet.be> on 2004.08.23 at 11:13:33(12045)
Hi,

I do like the look of variegated plants.
But I have a question Michael. You say on ebay that it is not a virus but a
genetic thing. If it is genetic, how do you explain that it is not always
the same, that it varies greatly and that not even all the offsets are
variegated? When I compare with let's say Hosta, then the variegation in
the plants is stabile and always the same. I would rather say that that is
genetic and that yours is a virus?
I am no good when it comes to genetics, so there may well be a perfectly
logical explanation. I was just wondering.
Whatever causes the variegation, I wish it would show up in more of my
plants:-)

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From: Neil Gordon <neil at ng23.abelgratis.co.uk> on 2004.08.23 at 12:35:29(12046)
I wasnt saying the varigated one looked bad! Just my plant!

Ive seen these before and the big ones look lovely.

Neil

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From: "Nathan Lange" <nelange at concentric.net> on 2004.08.23 at 15:28:42(12048)
The variegation patterns of streaked hostas, often prized for use in hosta
breeding programs, is highly unstable, but not viral.

Something to consider,
Nathan

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From: "Temmerman" <temmerm at skynet.be> on 2004.08.23 at 23:31:16(12052)
Yes, you're right about that. Those hosta used for breeding are not so easy
to find, just like this konjac:-)
But it still is a bit weird to me that something genetic does not happen all
over the plant.
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From: "Michael Marcotrigiano" <mmarcotr at email.smith.edu> on 2004.08.24 at 05:13:06(12053)
It is not a periclinal chimera but rather it appears to be a chlorplast
mutation that has not sorted out to white or green entirely and when it
does you get white or green plants but not variegated ones. I wrote an
extensive review of the control of variegation (HortScience 32: 773-784
(1997). I have reprints. If you send a snail mail address I'll get one
to you.

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From: "Michael Marcotrigiano" <mmarcotr at email.smith.edu> on 2004.08.24 at 12:19:04(12054)
Chloroplasts have their own genes (being derived from bacteria in
evolution) and they divide and occupy cells. When a chloroplast mutates
it can become white and when it divides it is in the cell with other
green ones. Eventually some cells sort out to all green, some all white,
most mixed, giving you a marble pattern. I am NOT sure this is the cause
of variegation in 'shattered glass' but the phenotype of shattered glass
is consistent with this mode of chloroplast inheritance. Until I do
crosses with it I can't unravel it for sure.

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From: "Sean A. O'Hara" <sean at support.net> on 2004.08.24 at 12:25:08(12055)
At 11:31 PM 8/23/2004, Temmerman wrote:
But it still is a bit weird to me that something genetic does not happen
all over the plant. Any explanation for that? If not, I guess I'll just
have to accept the facts:-)

Best,
Michael

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From: George Yao <gcyao at mydestiny.net> on 2004.08.24 at 21:59:52(12058)
Michael,

Let me venture an explanation. Some variegation are chimeral, which means
only some part of the tissue is genetically different. In variegation, the
difference is in the color, so you have patches of normal green and patches
of abnormal color, often yellow or white, side by side. The genetic
variation in chimeras usually cannot be transmitted to an offspring
sexually, however, offsets or pups can often get the same or similar
genetic variations in tissues.

George Yao

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From: "Temmerman" <temmerm at skynet.be> on 2004.08.24 at 23:27:19(12059)
Hi,

Thanks for the very interesting explanation. It all makes more sense now.

Best,
Michael

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