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  Great Pistia!
From: "ron iles" <roniles at eircom.net> on 2004.08.28 at 02:18:25(12074)
Best Wishes for everybody to win Gold with their
Water Lettuces in Miami capital of the United States of
Gondwanaland

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From: hermine <hermine at endangeredspecies.com> on 2004.08.28 at 11:16:07(12076)
there is a wonderful aquarium plant, most of us who had
aquaria as children will remember this, it is called Anacharis. in
England where it was introduced, it grew so rampantly as to impede boat
travel in waterways. it was known as BABBINGTON'S CURSE, after the
responsible botanist.
but what do I know. everything here in THE WEST is introduced,
Eucalyptus, tumbleweeds, (an illegal alien i believe native to Russia,
and considerable pest) and about 85% of what is grown in north America
for food, forage, ornament, and lumber is introduced.
Gondwana. An idea whose time has come, again.
hermine

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From: "danny wilson" <mudwasp_ at hotmail.com> on 2004.08.28 at 11:55:12(12078)
stop the madness! what next? lasia?
>From: "ron iles"
>Reply-To: Discussion of aroids
>To: ,"Discussion of aroids"
>Subject: [Aroid-l] Great Pistia!
>Date: Sat, 28 Aug 2004 10:18:25 +0100
>
>
>
>Best Wishes for everybody to win Gold with their Water Lettuces in Miami capital of the United States of Gondwanaland
>
>Ron Lespedeza (Pistia Protection Society, State of Purple Loostrife)
>
>PS This is of course not funny
>
>
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From: "Alistair Hay" <ajmhay at hotmail.com> on 2004.08.28 at 21:54:33(12080)
Homalomena expedita???????!!!!
A

----- Original Message -----

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From: "Leo A. Martin" <leo1010 at attglobal.net> on 2004.08.29 at 01:50:18(12082)
hermine wrote:
...everything here in THE WEST is introduced,
Eucalyptus, tumbleweeds,....
Don't forget the most damaging introduced organism of all.

Leo

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From: HUDSONSBIRDS at webtv.net on 2004.08.29 at 06:33:44(12084)
The word "INVASIVE" is beginning to bother me. Is it invasive to stock a
pond or lake with introduced fingerling BASS or BREAM ???Are they also
to be classed as "invasive"?Water hyacinth can be a hazard to travel in
boats--but in fact it is a water purification plant at the best.
"Invasive" is a tricky word The strongest will survive!!!

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From: hermine <hermine at endangeredspecies.com> on 2004.08.29 at 09:20:41(12088)
At 06:33 AM 8/29/04, HUDSONSBIRDS@webtv.net wrote:
The word "INVASIVE" is
beginning to bother me. Is it invasive to stock a
pond or lake with introduced fingerling BASS or BREAM ???Are they
also
to be classed as "invasive"?Water hyacinth can be a hazard to
travel in
boats--but in fact it is a water purification plant at the best.
"Invasive" is a tricky word The strongest will
survive!!!
I am reminded of the bomb tests on Bikini atoll.
it is now solid green, and the same introductory plant, some giant tree
fern i am humiliated to report i have forgotten which one, was the first
to grow there. what is lost is the diversity of species. instead of
having say, eight billion different kinds of plants, the regrowth
is only a couple of dozen. when you start from a position of total
destruction.
I do not know why the earth is not completely covered in Oxalis, if there
were prizes for it, including size of its onion, i would be a contenduh.

hermine

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From: hermine <hermine at endangeredspecies.com> on 2004.08.29 at 09:30:16(12089)
At 01:50 AM 8/29/04, Leo A. Martin wrote:
hermine wrote:
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From: "danny wilson" <mudwasp_ at hotmail.com> on 2004.08.29 at 10:23:51(12090)
invasive means taht something will spread outside of its intended range. "intended range" is of course relative to who planted teh plants. bass in a pond doesnt classify as invasive. it calssifies as introduced.
>From: HUDSONSBIRDS@webtv.net
>Reply-To: Discussion of aroids
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From: "ron" <ronlene at bellsouth.net> on 2004.08.29 at 10:54:22(12092)
Your last line hit the MARK !!! "THE STRONGEST WILL SURVIVE" Is this
really what we want?? If we enjoy a gentle lake or pond, do we really want
aggressive predators killing off our native species, that have evolved there
for eons. Do we want the aggressive "water purifying" plants to choke off
the beautiful flowering bog plants, that we have always enjoyed??
Do we want our beautiful woodlands to be overwhelmed by rapidly spreading
non-native species that are "STRONGER" in their new home, that the natives
that had always lived there???
This is what happened when the early explorers landed on their newly found
Islands and accidentally released rats and domestic animals. The "STRONGER"
survived and wiped out most of the local fauna. As a matter of fact. Look
at what happened when the "STRONGER" armed explorers landed in South
America. The "weaker" natives disappeared. Please, be careful what you
wish for!!! Ron

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From: RAYMOMATTLA at cs.com on 2004.08.29 at 16:16:24(12104)
Homalomena expedita....

Ahhh, now there is a plant I wouldnt mind seeing introduced...J/k by the way.

Ive noticed some of the waterways around Myrtle Beach South Carolina is FULL of Pistia and Water Hyacinth is everywhere you look these days...even here in northern South Carolina...I found it in the pond behind my backyard a few years ago, (had to have gotten there by birds). Wading Cattle ate it all up.
Michael

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From: "Eduardo Goncalves" <edggon at hotmail.com> on 2004.08.30 at 05:21:56(12110)
We (humans) are invasive too... Are we illegal?

Dr. Eduardo G. Goncalves
Universidade Catolica de Brasilia
Curso de Ciencias Biologicas
Sala M-206, QS 7, Lote 1, EPTC
CEP 72030-170, Taguatinga ? DF, BRAZIL.

Reply-To: Discussion of aroids
To: aroid-l@gizmoworks.com

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From: "Bryant, Harry E." <HEBryant at scj.com> on 2004.08.30 at 07:10:41(12111)
Thoughts on invasion vs introduction. Who makes the
decisions? I'm sure that when the TVA introduced Kudzu for erosion
control they thought it was tharmless. Take a drive along any road in TN
and SC and you tell me what whether the decision to introduce didn't become an
accidental invasion that costs an incredible toll. I'm not sure that
scientists, much less, hobbists are always capable or desirous of seeing the
potential for invasion. Nature doesn't need help in deciding sucession of
species. She generally does a pretty good job without our help.

Harry

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From: HUDSONSBIRDS at webtv.net on 2004.08.30 at 07:25:50(12112)
RON points well taken! Its just that if "WE" don't want the plant --its
a threat- invasive-in the "wrong place."On the other hand IF man wants a
new plant in his domain (such as RICE from China) then it is no threat
nor is it invasive. Perhaps you will agree US HUMANS are realitively new
on this earthly scene.--I HATE kudzu as much as you do!!

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From: HUDSONSBIRDS at webtv.net on 2004.08.30 at 07:35:40(12113)
RON _I just re-read your last sentence.The "weaker natives" of the
Americas overcome by the "stronger Europeans"
It WAS wrong!! But would you have the outcome different?? Would the
surviving "natives" want a different outcome? Nuff said --I admitngly
am nit-picking . As a horticulurist I have MANY times heard the
words--All plants are "WEEDS" somewhere--Otherwise YOU WIN !

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From: HUDSONSBIRDS at webtv.net on 2004.08.30 at 07:46:09(12114)
Danny If you were a minnow or a carp you might consider BASS as being
"invasive" on your feeding grounds NOT just "introduced"

_______________________________________________

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From: HUDSONSBIRDS at webtv.net on 2004.08.30 at 07:48:08(12115)
Harry--AMEN to your comments!!

_______________________________________________
Aroid-l mailing list

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From: "ron" <ronlene at bellsouth.net> on 2004.08.30 at 08:13:03(12118)
A plant in the wrong place is not invasive unless it starts to replace the
native plants in these places. It is just called a "weed". We have plenty
of those, unfortunately. A good example is Oxalis. In its present form, it
would have great difficulty replacing its neighbors, but it is indeed
usually a pest. Before I get to many complaints, there are some species of
Oxalis that make beautiful potted plants. As for Humans, some think they
can be invasive also. Ron

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From: "ron" <ronlene at bellsouth.net> on 2004.08.30 at 08:24:17(12119)
THANK YOU!! (I think?)
I AM selfish! Therefore, I AM!!! (here) Ron

-----Original Message-----

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From: "danny wilson" <mudwasp_ at hotmail.com> on 2004.08.30 at 10:25:58(12123)
in america, some are!
>From: "Eduardo Goncalves"
>Reply-To: Discussion of aroids
>To: aroid-l@gizmoworks.com
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From: MossyTrail at cs.com on 2004.09.06 at 22:43:19(12172)
>>As Peter Ward put it, are we are reuniting Gondwanaland?

...but North America was never part of Gondwanaland! It was part of Laurasia. Perhaps Peter Ward meant to refer to Pangaea?

Jason Hernandez

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