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  Wild Titan's ?/YES
From: "Julius Boos" ju-bo at msn.com> on 2006.08.23 at 15:57:41(14554)
Reply-To : Discussion of aroids
Sent : Tuesday, August 22, 2006 9:22 PM
To :
Subject : [Aroid-l] Wild Titan's ?

Dear Skip and all other Amorphophallus "freaks" out there,

I am not able to resist once more stepping up to the plate as a bit of a
'shill' on behalf of the IAS!
Thanks for your question, Skip, it was well worth pondering! Yes, actually
in the past quite a bit of information on this particular species has been
published in several great articles in our yearly Journal the "Aroideana"
mag. In past issues there have been WONDERFUL articles and discussions with
photos of wild blooming A. titanums AND other giant species of
Amorphophallus', together with discussions and photos on the
probable/possible pollinators. The famous 'stench' produced at anthesis in
the jungle makes certain that the pollinators are attracted from both near
and far, and since these plants do not seem to be unusually uncommon in
nature, pollination and fruiting did not seem uncommon. In fact there were
photos of a huge infructesence in the wild! The distributors of ripe fruit
and seed were reported to be giant horn-bill birds, they swallow the fruit
whole, and re-gurgitate the seeds in perfect condition at quite a distance
from the 'mother' plant. These articles are authored by such greats as our
own 'King Phallus' AKA my friend Wilbert Hetterschied, the late Dr. Jim
Symon, another by an Italian Lady-Doctor, etc. etc. Back-issues of these
publications are still available at nominal cost from the IAS.
Dr. Attenborough was with Jim Simon and Wilbert on the quest for blooming
Amorphophallus' in the wilds, and great images appear on the made-for-TV
special named (I think!) "The wonderful life of plants'' or some-such, still
available in video and book-form, well worth the price, so check it out. In
her WONDERFUL book on Aroids, our own Deni Bown also tracks the elusive
blooms of A. titanum, and provides great photos and info. on this icon of
our world of aroids.
So---come on folks, join us as members of the IAS, and so support our
ongoing research and interest into this wonderful world of plants, and so
get your yearly 'doses' of Aroideanas and our monthly newsletters! Please
consider joining us in Sept. in Miami, come meet some of the characters who
make up the IAS and see live specimens of these giants and others, the
growing legacy of the fantasticly tallented grower Craig Alan, the plants
from seeds ex: the great Dr. Jim Simon, get to (maybe!) even touch a petiole
the size of your thigh, and so experience that the name 'Amorphophallus'
probably did NOT only originate from the spadix`s shape or lack thereof,
etc.!!! Step right up, folks, right this way----!!!

Good Growing,

Julius Boos

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From: "Bryant, Susan L." SLBryant at scj.com> on 2006.08.24 at 05:24:35(14555)
Good shill, Julius!

The show was called The Private life of plants
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Private_Life_of_Plants

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From: "Wilbert Hetterscheid" hetter at xs4all.nl> on 2006.08.24 at 09:07:26(14556)
Hin Susan,

Lord P here: are you sure I was in the footage??? I never saw that in the
BBC-series, so care to explain where the footage came from? I don't quite
understand this.

Cheerio,
Lord P.

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From: abri1973 at wp.pl> on 2006.08.24 at 09:59:59(14557)
Hello,

I have these photos scanned in my page by permission of the editor.

http://www.wschowa.com/abrimaal/araceum/amorphophallus/titanum.htm

Marek

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From: "Bryant, Susan L." SLBryant at scj.com> on 2006.08.25 at 05:19:39(14558)
Sorry Lord P,
Memory gets more faulty with age. Perhaps I get my Lords mixed up. Oh
Wait, Attenborough was only a Sir, his brother was the Lord.
OK, series shows some good looking man clambering about the countryside,
must not have been Wilbert. hi hi
Ta
Susan
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From: "Wilbert Hetterscheid" hetter at xs4all.nl> on 2006.08.25 at 08:57:08(14560)
In fact, in the meantime I am like TWO good looking men...............

Lord P+P

> -----Oorspronkelijk bericht-----

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From: bonaventure at optonline.net on 2006.08.27 at 22:44:56(14565)
Is there available any saved pollen of Amorphophallus titanum for possible future Amorphophallus cross pollinations to be done by serious hobbyists in their own collections?

Bonaventure Magrys

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From: "Horak, David" davidhorak at bbg.org> on 2006.08.29 at 08:49:16(14569)
Title: Message

This
posed an interesting question for us here at the Garden. Normally our
collections policy is based on institutional distributions. The complexities of
international treaties, their interpretation and public opinion mean that
institutions often need to be conservative in their actions. While
this can mean that distributions of seed, plants (including excess
plants and divisions) or plant parts may not be available to those who
might be efficacious at contributing to real meaningful conservation efforts-the
serious hobbyists-this is not uniform in the botanic garden world, but I suspect
that it might get more so with time. It is probably axiomatic that the more
threatened a species is, the more difficulties there will be in trying to
save it.

In
this instance though, we did save pollen from the recent blooming of
our A. titanum and because of its relatively short viability, are willing to
possibly make it available to both institutions and the serious
hobbyist. Of course this will be on a case-by-case basis, but please, anyone
serious, dedicated and fortunate enough to be able to bloom one should contact
us.

Dave
Horak

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From: bonaventure at optonline.net on 2006.08.30 at 18:38:33(14571)
Thank you Dave,

My intentions were of the more "mad scientist" type. I was hoping there was an excess of pollen, but for my purposes the point is moot anyway. you see I wanted to try to cross titanum with the konjacs that are now taking over my front yard and bloom in spring.

I have become jaded and am no longer impressed with their 2 foot high inflorescences and 4 foot high and wide leaves. I am though still impressed by their extreme hardiness and reliability of bloom and their powers of vegetative increase and I may be a bit insane in wanting a larger version with possibly cold tolerence plus hybrid vigor to boot.

Bonaventure

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