IAS Aroid Quasi Forum

About Aroid-L
 This is a continuously updated archive of the Aroid-L mailing list in a forum format - not an actual Forum. If you want to post, you will still need to register for the Aroid-L mailing list and send your postings by e-mail for moderation in the normal way.

  problem titan question
From: ironious2 at yahoo.com (E Morano) on 2008.04.14 at 19:50:46(17386)
*sigh* Some of the leaves on my brand new titans are starting to turn yellow. They have been in full shade and Ive kept the soil wet. They look like they've been over watered but I thought they liked water. It has been very windy too and these plants were soft greenhouse plants. Could that be the problem? Im very disappointed here, I just dont get it.

-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...

+More
From: ronmchatton at aol.com (ronmchatton at aol.com) on 2008.04.15 at 06:00:54(17387)
They may just be going dormant.? There's a common misconception that they go dormant for the winter and many of them do however, they really go dormant when the correct time for that particular plant is reached and I've had them stay up for as long as 18 months.? All of mine go dormant this time of the year and come back up about the middle of June.? Look at the petiole for vertical wrinkling.? As the leaf begins to die back it not only begins to yellow but the petiole will start to look like it's drying out.You can gently slip them out of the pot and look at the roots or the corm.? It is correct that they appreciate good water but that doesn't mean sopping wet either.? I find them actually easier to grow if kept just slightly drier.? It's always easier to recover from too little water than it is to recover from too much.

Ron McHatton

+More
From: honeybunny442 at yahoo.com (Susan B) on 2008.04.15 at 13:54:38(17392)
I've heard that young AT don't like their roots disturbed, however I don't know if that is true or not. If you were poking through the pots looking to see if you had one or two tubers, you may have done some root damage.
How warm is your greenhouse?

+More
From: ironious2 at yahoo.com (E Morano) on 2008.04.15 at 15:15:30(17397)
Here's another question, Would you say that having two corms in hte pot is a bad thing? You said the seed split or something. Im asking because I say a 6 inch seedling sell for $40 and my 24 inch plant sold for a measly $20.50. How did you say that they cam to have two plants in one pot?
Thanks
Erin

+More
From: ironious2 at yahoo.com (E Morano) on 2008.04.15 at 18:16:55(17399)
I do not have a green house. I want to acclimate them to the outside so they will be stronger plants. If they are like most plants, having them outside will make the leaves and skin thicker and and more able to stave off disease. I only looked at one plants roots and that one is doing fine, although it is the one that got beat up the most in the mail. The weather is acting very strange. The day before yesterday it was 87 degrees. Yesterday it was 61 and today its 64 and its supposed to be 75 tomorrow.

Im thinking of treating them with Naphthalene Acetic Acid which can significantly increase the number, length and dry weight of root hairs, small roots and large roots. Im thinking that the property that causes an increase in large roots will increase the size of the corm while it is increasing in size. Also using Brassinolide which is a naturally occurring plant steroid normally found in small amounts in all plants. Brassinolide improves plant growth through plant photosynthesis, resistance to cold and water shortage among other things.Im considering Triacontanol. One of Triacontanol's action is in improving photosynthesis by helping the plant locate light. Since light is a primary source of nutrition the benefits of using Triacontanol are obvious. It will also increase cell division. Im also considering Indole acetic acid. Im not sure because a lot of my plants have mutated be cause of Indole acetic acid. What I will be using in conjunction with these hormones is a
Compound Amino Acid Plus Fertilizer 50%. Most commercial plant nutrients only contain a few of the 70 or more nutrients that plants require. If you add amino powder to your regular plant nutrient it rapidly corrects nutrient deficiencies and generates stronger and healthier plants. It contains seventeen L-amino acids including l-threonine, l-valine, l-methionine and semi necessary amino acids such as l-arginine, l-histidine. The Compound amino acid powder Im using is made from natural protein and easily dissolves in water. I will also be using Fulvic acid which is the most plant-active of the of the humic acid compounds. It's a plant growth stimulator that increases plant metabolism, nutrient intake and improves root growth. And lastly Organic Kelp Extract, NOT kelp meal. It's 100% organic and is rich with natural hormones, minerals and other elements. Adding even small amounts of it to your regular fertilizer will
help ensure that your plants receive more of the 80 or more needed nutrients usually missing from off-the-shelf fertilizers.
It is important to use these fertilizers because of the demand for growth the hormones and steroids will be putting on the plant. You can find these products and more along with this information from http://www.super-grow.biz
Erin

+More
From: ronmchatton at aol.com (ronmchatton at aol.com) on 2008.04.15 at 19:11:19(17400)
I've completely bare-rooted actively growing titanum seedlings and replanted them in fresh mix and never had a problem with a single one of them.? I've even cut the leaf off of 200 of them with less than completely formed corms, dried them out slightly and shipped them overseas and, to my knowledge, they all survived.

Ron McHatton

+More
From: ronmchatton at aol.com (ronmchatton at aol.com) on 2008.04.15 at 19:15:16(17401)
When a second one come up like that it's damage to the corm or to the developing seedling unless, in rare situations, the seed is twin.? Auctions are an interesting situation.? You never know how prices will run.? EFG prices their individual seedlings at that price, but you don't know how many of them they sell at that price.

Regarding this question about foliage yellowing.? Send me some pictures and I'll take a look at them.? It's really the only way to tell.

Ron McHatton

+More
From: ironious2 at yahoo.com (E Morano) on 2008.04.16 at 10:45:47(17410)
I think these seeds are twins. When I dug one up, there were clearly two corms there.

+More
From: ronmchatton at aol.com (ronmchatton at aol.com) on 2008.04.16 at 13:01:03(17412)
You can't tell at this point.? The plants you have have each produced several leaves each time reforming the corm.? The time to have been able to tell would have been when the first leaves were emerging.? In some of the seeds, the first leaf to come up was a single leaf which then, for one reason or another went down, to be followed by two leaves somewhat distant from each other.? In those cases it's clearly damage to the growing point of the first corm that resulted in two new growing points.? In one case I even found the remains of the damaged corm, main growing point missing, connecting the two new plants.? In some other cases, the initial growth was two leaves indicating either very early shipping damage or twin.? I think the really important thing here is that you got more than you bargained for.? Imagine the conversation we'd all be having if you ordered 10 and got 8 plants and two empty pots.

Ron McHatton

+More
Note: this is a very old post, so no reply function is available.