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  Spathiphyllum ID
From: "JaredR McKinley" <jaredr.mckinley at gmail.com> on 2008.11.11 at 16:47:14(18715)
Hi. I was a member a long time ago, and have recently rejoined. I am a general plant enthusiast in Tucson.

I just had a friend who had a little accident with his plant. His gardener hacked it up pretty good. He wants a replacement, but I am not sure exactly what it is. I think it is a Spathiphyllum species. But I am not totally sure. Here are some image links. Can anyone identify this for me and even better, let me know where I could obtain a nice large specimen? It is a rather large plant, or at least it was before it was "trimmed".

http://s104.photobucket.com/albums/m173/manihot/?action=view¤t=IMG_6005.jpg
http://s104.photobucket.com/albums/m173/manihot/?action=view¤t=IMG_6006.jpg
http://s104.photobucket.com/albums/m173/manihot/?action=view¤t=IMG_6007.jpg
http://s104.photobucket.com/albums/m173/manihot/?action=view¤t=IMG_6008.jpg

thanks. And I look forward to corresponding with you guys again. I remember some real plant nerds in this list! (that is, of course, a compliment)

--
((Expecto Patronum))

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From: "Emily Colletti" <Emily.Colletti at mobot.org> on 2008.11.12 at 05:33:22(18722)
Definetley a Pachyneurium, an Anthurium sp.

It will grow back.

Steve Lucas which pachy do you think it is????

From: aroid-l-bounces@gizmoworks.com [mailto:aroid-l-bounces@gizmoworks.com] On Behalf Of JaredR McKinley
Sent: Tuesday, November 11, 2008 6:47 PM
To: aroid-l@gizmoworks.com

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From: ExoticRainforest <Steve at exoticrainforest.com> on 2008.11.12 at 15:05:38(18725)
Jared,

Appears to be an Anthurium but I can't be certain of the hybrid(or species) since your spadix photo doesn't clearly show the spathe. My guess would be a hybrid form of Anthurium plowmanii.

Steve Lucas

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From: ExoticRainforest <Steve at exoticrainforest.com> on 2008.11.12 at 19:55:18(18727)
Emily, I would think Anthuriumplowmanii and Leland Miyano appears to agree via a private email. Dr. Croat once commented about a natural variation collected by FredFuchs in Bolivia which was being called Anthurium plowmaniiFruffles and Leland tended towards that variation. Jared, just in caseyou aren't aware, virtually all aroids have natural variations and theyare sometimes numerous. Basically, every plant in the species does nothave to appear exactly alike. You might want to take a look at mywebpage on the species here:

http://www.exoticrainforest.com/Anthurium%20plowmanii%20pc.html

The top photo is by Enid Offolter who is well known to almost all of uson Aroid l. Take a look at her photo and see if the plants appear tobe the same. I made my name recommendation based on the shape of themid rib, what appears to be a U shaped petiole in one photo along withthe undulated leaf margins (ruffled edges) and the pale greenish colorof the spadix. If we had a photo of the spathe it would be possible tooffer a more postive ID (non-scientific on my part!).

By the way, I believe there are some tissue cultured specimens aroundso as a non-scientist I wouldn't dare suggest if the plant is aspecies or a hybrid.

Steve

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From: "Denis Rotolante" <denis at skg.com> on 2008.11.13 at 06:56:21(18729)
NOT SPATHIPHYLLUM! ANTHURIUM PLOWMANII OR SIMILAR SPECIES.

-----Original Message-----
From: aroid-l-bounces@gizmoworks.com [mailto:aroid-l-bounces@gizmoworks.com] On Behalf Of JaredR McKinley

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From: ExoticRainforest <Steve at exoticrainforest.com> on 2008.11.14 at 04:16:12(18730)
Jared, it didn't dawn on me youmight be thinking the plant was dead. I've been reminded by twoexperts that this plant is not necessarily a goner just because thespathe and foliage have been removed. If the stem and roots are stillintact where the plant was planted it will grow again. If the stemand roots have been dug up but not destroyed just replant them. Sincethis is an established specimen chances are high your friend will see arecovery faster than expected. Anthurium species can toleratefairly long periods without water and recover nicely. In fact, if youonly have a descent chunk of the stem with a few roots you can plantthem and have even more plants.

Steve Lucas

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From: ExoticRainforest <Steve at ExoticRainforest.com> on 2008.11.14 at 11:44:31(18731)
Just one more note Jared. Thisquote came from a friend who has done a great deal of collectingalongside botanists such as Dr. Croat in the tropical world,

"He can get anew plant from a 6 to12 inch piece of the stem without any roots. That is how we collectplants."

Hope this helps,

Steve Lucas

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