IAS Aroid Quasi Forum

About Aroid-L
 This is a continuously updated archive of the Aroid-L mailing list in a forum format - not an actual Forum. If you want to post, you will still need to register for the Aroid-L mailing list and send your postings by e-mail for moderation in the normal way.

  Temperature requierements for Helicodiceros
From: "StroWi at t-online.de" <StroWi at t-online.de> on 2010.01.27 at 01:28:59(20516)
Aroiders,


HTML

+More

From: Christopher Rogers <crogers at ecoanalysts.com> on 2010.01.28 at 10:31:33(20521)
Greetings, Bernhard!

I know that some people have grown this plant in warmer areas by putting the
tubers in the refrigerator for a few months.

Here in California, my Helicodiceros and Dracunculus started coming up in
the end of December. Here we have a Mediterranean climate. In fact almost
all of our invasive weeds here are Mediterranean natives: Avena, Hordeum,
Vinca, Lolium multiflorum, Taeniatherum, Centauria solstitialis, Centauria
diffusa, Carduus pycnocephalus, Carthamus . . . just to name a few. We have
hot dry summers, with temperatures in the 40s degrees C. In September and
October the temperature begins to drop. By December we are having our first
freezes. My Biarums were out in September and all my Arums (I have eight
species) and Ambrosina bassi have at least the first leaves up by November.
We have cool to cold wet winters, and the Helicodiceros is usually in full
foliage by end of February. I get my first blooms in April.

I hope that this helps,

Christopher

HTML

+More

From: Susan B <honeybunny442 at yahoo.com> on 2010.01.28 at 17:57:13(20523)
Bernhard,
I am certainly no expert when it comes to this plant, but I do have a few in pots, so I will share what I know! Here in Tennessee, USA, they start growing in December and die back in hot weather, but I think they last until June or July.
My pots were under a potting bench, getting almost no light and only a little water dripping from the pots above. I pull them out when I notice them starting to grow.
Mine have never bloomed, however.
They are in a greenhouse that gets down to about 50F (10C) at night an from 50-100F during the day (depending on outside temperature and sun).

HTML

+More

From: "plantguy at zoominternet.net" <plantguy at zoominternet.net> on 2010.01.29 at 05:20:32(20525)
I had some of these for about 5 years that I had imported from somewhere in
France maybe 8 years or so ago and I can tell you that they did not like
being in my basement under grow lights where at night when the lights are
off it will get to around 50F and sometimes lower. They produced offsets,
but never flowered so I sold them a few years ago (same with Dracunculus
canariensis by the way, although this one did flower a couple of times).
The same conditions allow many winter growing bulbs from South Africa
(Boophane, Brunsvigia, Gethyllis, etc) and South America (Paramongaia, some
Rauhia, etc) to grow and flower so it was just these guys that did not like
my conditions......way too cold in zone 6 to stay in the ground here (lows
to -5F (-20C) on occasion). I guess they just want to be outside in the
elements and feel the temp swings, humidity, etc. Best of luck,

Dan

+More
From: "Marek Argent" <abri1973 at wp.pl> on 2010.01.29 at 10:04:27(20527)
Hello,

I live in zone 7a, so I don't risk leaving Dracunculus vulgaris (which has similar requirements as Helicodiceros muscivorus),

so I cultivate it at home. It is dormant through all the summer and autumn, it wakes up in December, blooms in February and soon after it goes dormant again. Here's my page:

http://www.wschowa.com/abrimaal/araceum/dracunculus/vulgaris2.htm

Marek

HTML

+More

From: Sheldon Hatheway <sfhatheway at yahoo.com> on 2010.01.30 at 12:07:21(20530)
Hi,

I live in Canby, OR, USA (zone 7 something). Our normal winter temperatures go below freezing and sometimes into the teens and somewhat rarely down into the single digits, all with a great deal of rain. I have grown D. vulgaris for over 20 years outside with no protection at a depth of about 4"-6". I was surprised at how well it grew. One winter the temperature fell to just above zero F. for about a week. I don't know if this is unusual or not because it's the only one I've ever grown. It emerges in March-April, flowers in June-July and goes dormant in October-November.

Sheldon Hatheway

HTML

+More

From: Christopher Rogers <crogers at ecoanalysts.com> on 2010.02.22 at 09:11:03(20638)
Hello, Bernhard!

My experience is that Helicodiceros goes dormant in response to high
temperatures and lack of rain, while dormancy is broken by the cold of
winter, but occasionally from the onset of rain. My plants will break
dormancy and start to grow in the autumn if I water them, however, they
stop growing just below the soil surface. Once the temperatures drop
down around freezing, they begin growing past the soil surface and into
the full vegetative stage. I hope I am answering your question. Please
let me know if I am still missing your point.

Happy days!

Christopher

+More
From: Christopher Rogers <crogers at ecoanalysts.com> on 2010.02.22 at 09:11:03(20639)
Hello, Bernhard!

My experience is that Helicodicerosgoes dormant in response to high temperatures and lack of rain, while dormancyis broken by the cold of winter, but occasionally from the onset of rain. Myplants will break dormancy and start to grow in the autumn if I water them,however, they stop growing just below the soil surface. Once the temperaturesdrop down around freezing, they begin growing past the soil surface and intothe full vegetative stage. I hope I am answering your question. Please let meknow if I am still missing your point.

Happy days!

Christopher

HTML

+More

From: "StroWi at t-online.de" <StroWi at t-online.de> on 2010.02.22 at 22:54:00(20650)
_______________________________________________
Aroid-L mailing list
Aroid-L@www.gizmoworks.com
+More
From: "StroWi at t-online.de" <StroWi at t-online.de> on 2010.02.22 at 22:54:00(20651)
Dear Christopher,

thanksfor your input.


HTML

+More

From: Christopher Rogers <CRogers at ecoanalysts.com> on 2010.02.24 at 07:56:49(20659)
Good morning, Bernhard!

For my plants, blooming seems directly tied to the previous season's nouris
hment. Plants kept in the shade never bloom. Plants in full sun give one bl
oom every other year. Plants in full sun given lots of good compost or fert
ilizer give one to three blooms per year. If a plant gives more than one bl
oom, it does not bloom the following year.

When a plant breaks dormancy and grows to blooming size, if it blooms, it t
ypically goes dormant about a month later. If it does not bloom, then dorma
ncy is postponed for a short while. The plant obviously needs a rest.

Blooming always occurs (for my specimens) in the spring, when temperatures
have warmed up considerably.

I know that some people in subtropical climes have broken dormancy by putti
ng the tubers in the refrigerator for a few weeks, then moved them in front
of the air conditioner for a few weeks after that.

If you choose to experiment, I would be very interested in your results.

Good luck
Christopher

+More
From: Christopher Rogers <CRogers at ecoanalysts.com> on 2010.02.24 at 07:56:49(20660)
Good morning, Bernhard!

For my plants, blooming seems directly tied to the previous season's nourishment. Plants kept in the shade never bloom. Plants in full sun give one bloom every other year. Plants in full sun given lots of good compost or fertilizer give one to three blooms per year. If a plant gives more than one bloom, it does not bloom the following year.

When a plant breaks dormancy and grows to blooming size, if it blooms, it typically goes dormant about a month later. If it does not bloom, then dormancy is postponed for a short while.The plant obviously needs a rest.

Blooming always occurs (for my specimens) in the spring, when temperatures have warmed up considerably..

I know that some people in subtropical climes have broken dormancy by putting the tubers in the refrigerator for a few weeks, then moved them in front of the air conditioner for a few weeks after that.

If you choose to experiment, I would be very interested in your results.

Good luck

Christopher

HTML

+More

Note: this is a very old post, so no reply function is available.