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  Monstera dilacerata
From: Michael Pascall <mickpascall at hotmail.com> on 2010.04.09 at 00:30:36(20807)
This plant grows well in the tropics . A division was recvd from Tom many y
ears ago when the collection was shifted at MoBoT.

I like the quilted young foliage and beautiful dissected mature leaves.
It looks different to the native Epipremnum pinnatum when a young shingling
plant but can be difficult to distinguish when mature .

BUT this name has vanished and is supposed to be a syn. for Epipremnum pinn
atum .

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From: Michael Pascall <mickpascall at hotmail.com> on 2010.04.13 at 05:25:58(20834)
So this must now be Monstera pinnatipartita pictures of mature foliage
from David Scherberichs site match exactly .

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From: Michael Pascall <mickpascall at hotmail.com> on 2010.04.13 at 05:25:58(20835)
So this must now be Monstera pinnatipartita , pictures of mature foliage from David Scherberichs site match exactly .
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From: ExoticRainforest <Steve at ExoticRainforest.com> on 2010.04.26 at 11:19:48(20947)
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From: ExoticRainforest <Steve at ExoticRainforest.com> on 2010.04.26 at 11:19:48(20948)

With the help of Emily Colleti of the Missouri Botanical Garden, I wasable to photograph some of these species in the aroid greenhouse at theMissouri Botanical Garden on Friday on last week. I was quitesurprised at what I learned and I'm certain many collectors will be aswell. I did not manipulate the colors and both Emily and I noticed theblueish cast to these plants. I am post two well known species withthis post and I am relativelycertain most will be surprised what Monstera siltepecana and Monsterapinnatiparita actually look like in the juvenile form. I will beupdating my own website immediately.

I'm certain some will disagree with the names on these photos but theywere taken directly from the tags of specimens Dr. Croat collected. Wealso noticed that many juveniles from a variety of species were nearlyidentical is shape making a correct determination of a juvenile plantextremely difficult if you can't see it in a major botanical gardencollection.

Steve

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