IAS Aroid Quasi Forum

About Aroid-L
 This is a continuously updated archive of the Aroid-L mailing list in a forum format - not an actual Forum. If you want to post, you will still need to register for the Aroid-L mailing list and send your postings by e-mail for moderation in the normal way.

  Wind
From: DAVID LEEDY <djleedy at sbcglobal.net> on 2011.11.17 at 08:13:44(22300)

I plan on growing some arisaema outside.

Due to the very strong winds we have in Texas, it is necessary to provide protection for some plants. For example, I use a tomato cage for taller Asiatic lilies grown in the ground.

Is there a product or any ideas as to how to protect an aroid with a relatively tall, single peduncle or petiole (e.g. amorphophallus, dracontium, arisaema, etc.) in a small growing container (5 gal or less)?

David Leedy

---2114655128-1299924745-1321546424=:96778--

HTML

+More

From: "Ertelt, Jonathan B" <jonathan.ertelt at Vanderbilt.Edu> on 2011.11.17 at 19:45:28(22305)
David,

It depends to some extent on what you are concerned that the wind will do. Stakes of several varieties could be used for single petiole leaves and such - or if you think that the whole thing might blow over, i.e. pot and all, use a plastic pot and drive a piece of rebar through the bottom and into the ground. Alternatively, with smaller pots you can set them down into cinder blocks - I actually just recently saw a cinder block wall treatment where some of the cinder blocks were half sticking out of the wall, i.e. perpendicular to the majority of the wall, such that 1/2 the block could then be filled with a soil mix after screening had been glued to the bottom - these were used for succulents - but certainly weren't going to blow anywhere. The wall idea might workj for you as a wind block as well, and could be used ofr a variety of plants, aroid and non. Just a few thoughts.

Jonathan

+More
From: Ken Mosher <ken at spatulacity.com> on 2011.11.17 at 20:34:22(22307)
Guy Wires is the only solution that comes to mind. Or temporarily
mount your containers to the ground in some fashion.

-Ken

HTML

+More

From: michael kolaczewski <mjkolaffhbc at sbcglobal.net> on 2011.11.17 at 20:48:42(22308)
Greetings David,

We also have strong winds here ( The Windy City !! )

In the Chicago Land Area, the Arisaema that grow through out the

woods and glades, grow in and amongst other herbaceous

plants that carpet the ground under Oaks, Maples, Shag Bark

Hickories, and also various shrubs.

Typically, these plants are "protected" by their neighbors, the plants

forming their own wind breaks if you will, and being under large trees

that provide wind, rain and sunlight diffusion by the action of their canopies.

These forest dwellers are exposed to the elements, and these various buffers help them

to grow in their
habitats.

In the garden, small containers that are not behind some kind of natural

or artificial screen should anchored in the ground with a bamboo stake or rebar,

to prevent them from blowing over. You can use the available rings that are sold for

perennials, to contain stems, or even flower stalks from flopping around in the wind.

There are tall metal stakes, with a loop at the top, that are used to keep Lily stems

upright, and I myself use taller bamboo stakes and plant tape to sometimes keep

taller specimens from snapping, when we have the typical summer thunder storms

that bring high winds and strong rain.

I hope this post gives you some more ideas to consider.

Michael Kolaczewski

HTML

+More

From: Susan B <honeybunny442 at yahoo.com> on 2011.11.17 at 21:09:07(22309)
Maybe some nice shrubbery??

From: DAVID LEEDY
To: aroid-l@gizmoworks.com

HTML

+More

From: DAVID LEEDY <djleedy at sbcglobal.net> on 2011.11.18 at 06:02:29(22313)
Thank you Jonathan. The cinder block idea is certainly worth considering.

I am concerned that the wind will bend/break the petiole/peduncle. If I used a normal stake (e.g. bamboo), there is nothing to hold a tie (plastic or ?) in place on the plant, so it has to be on the stake. I might use a little larger stake and staple the tie in place. Just wondering what others had tried or thought of.

Thanx.

David

HTML

+More

From: "Ertelt, Jonathan B" <jonathan.ertelt at Vanderbilt.Edu> on 2011.11.18 at 11:53:28(22318)
David,

One version of the cinder block wall can be found at - it certainly bears some thought and exploration – neat idea in the right place. With any twist-tie I would recommend first making a loop around the stake and tightening it with a couple of twists such that the twist-tie will stay at the desired elevation – then wrap the ends around the petiole and twist the ends a time or two and you’re all set.

Cheers.

Jonathan

HTML

+More

From: hermine <hermine at endangeredspecies.com> on 2011.11.18 at 12:36:59(22321)
At 09:09 PM 11/17/2011, you wrote:
>Maybe some nice shrubbery??

I cannot think of a better windbreak than bamboo.

hermine

+More
From: STARSELL at aol.com on 2011.11.18 at 14:59:08(22326)
Hi Hermine, and All,

Here in the South bamboo is not an option, for anything!

We have a way too nurturing climate for it and it is so invasive here that

it can nearly not be eradicated. (Only with help from chemicals not normally

available to homeowners.)

HTML

+More

From: Ken Mosher <ken at spatulacity.com> on 2011.11.18 at 15:34:30(22328)
Ni!

On 11/18/2011 12:09 AM, Susan B wrote:

Maybe some nice shrubbery??

From:

HTML

+More

From: hermine <hermine at endangeredspecies.com> on 2011.11.19 at 10:26:55(22334)
At 02:59 PM 11/18/2011, you wrote:

Hi Hermine, and All,

Here in the South bamboo is not an option, for anything!

We have a way too nurturing climate for it and it is so invasive here
that

it can nearly not be eradicated. (Only with help from chemicals not
normally

available to homeowners.)

Clumping bamboo. Does not run, can easily be kept in bounds...well
in places where bamboo is normal and natural, it may be in a
densely plant-populated place, this environment nurtures an
understory of plants which require the protection of a dense
competitive plant environment.

I wonder what bamboo is so invasive, since there are many other cane type
plants which people call bamboo but which are not.

hermine

HTML

+More

Note: this is a very old post, so no reply function is available.