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  Invasive aroids?
From: a sunjian <asjbiotek at gmail.com> on 2018.08.14 at 11:57:41(23954)
I'm wondering whether there are any aroids that are considered invasive? I know some aquatics can be (e.g. Pistia stratiotes), but what about any land-based ones?

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From: The Silent Seed <tylus.seklos at gmail.com> on 2018.08.14 at 12:03:41(23955)
Hi

Yes! Pinellia for sure. Typhoniums - maybe. And plenty of marginals. (Arrowheads and such.) Some Arums as well.

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From: "D. Christopher Rogers" <branchiopod at gmail.com> on 2018.08.14 at 12:15:35(23956)
Hello my friend,

Gonatopus boivini, Arum italicum, Pinellia pedatisecta, tripartita, and ternata all have been reported as local invasives in different parts of the USA.

Cheers,

Christopher

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From: "Ertelt, Jonathan B" <jonathan.ertelt at Vanderbilt.Edu> on 2018.08.14 at 12:33:54(23957)
Cannot agree loudly enough about the Pinellia, the fruit is barely noticeable but I now have it all over my yard and it is difficult to get back in bounds once escaped. Around here (Nashville, middle Tennessee) Arum italicum could probably
become invasive, but the leaves are obvious enough that it can be pulled or dug and shared with a warning. But my experience with the Pinnellia spp. tells me to refuse to share this one most seriously. Never have tried Gonatopus outside – would be surprised
to find it seed hardy this far north, but it might be – don’t think I’ll test it out. Good Growing!

Jonathan

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From: Zach DuFran <zdufran at gmail.com> on 2018.08.14 at 12:38:49(23958)
I have seen some Colocasia esculenta growing unchecked in some areas. It is listed on the University of Florida invasive species list: https://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/plant-directory/colocasia-esculenta/

Zach

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From: Peter Boyce <phymatarum at gmail.com> on 2018.08.14 at 13:58:33(23959)
Here in Malaysia Syngonium podophyllum is pestilential, even invading mature secondary forest. Dieffenbachia not much better.
Peter

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From: Steve Marak <samarak at gizmoworks.com> on 2018.08.14 at 13:14:08(23961)
I suspect there is some variation depending on the clone. I have
two accessions of Pinella ternata, considered one of if not the
weediest of the genus. One, from Jim Waddick, I've grown outdoors
for many years now. It grows so slowly there were years I wasn't
sure it was increasing at all. Definitely not invasive, in my
climate.

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From: a sunjian <asjbiotek at gmail.com> on 2018.08.14 at 13:13:13(23962)
Ahhhh...great...thanks all...I took a look at Pinellia, and it is indeed a hard to get rid of invasive here in the northeast.

https://s3.amazonaws.com/assets.cce.cornell.edu/attachments/1985/crowdipper.pdf?1408469384

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From: "D. Christopher Rogers" <branchiopod at gmail.com> on 2018.08.14 at 13:36:12(23963)
Arum italicum is an invasive in coastal California. I have read a few times that Gonatopus boivini is invasive in the southeastern US.

On 14 August 2018 at 15:13, a sunjian wrote:

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From: "D. Christopher Rogers" <branchiopod at gmail.com> on 2018.08.14 at 14:17:05(23964)
That is a really good point. I have seen Syngonium podophyllum growing out of control in Thailand, Laos, Taiwan, and also wild in Guam, where it was frequently in the company of Monstera deliciosa, Epiprenum pinnatum and E. aureum, plus various Caladium vaietals. I just checked my notes: I also had E. aureum growing wild in Taiwan.

Happy days,

Christopher

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From: a sunjian <asjbiotek at gmail.com> on 2018.08.14 at 14:29:04(23965)
The funny thing is I've always considered aroids to be these unusual tropical plants that actually have to be protected, so it's interesting to see that some species do become invasive.

In fact,
Syngonium podophyllum is also considered an invasive in FL. not just in Malaysia.

http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/in530

It is classified as a Category I invasive (which is where such heavyweights as cogon grass and kudzu are also placed).

CATEGORY I

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From: Peter Boyce <phymatarum at gmail.com> on 2018.08.14 at 14:40:55(23970)
Of our native aroids Homalomena expedita is very invasive through deep stolons as, too, are the surface-stolon expressions of Colocasia esculenta

On Wed, 15 Aug 2018, 05:30 a sunjian, wrote:

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From: "Michael N. Cohen" <tm8ters4u at aol.com> on 2018.08.14 at 12:33:47(23971)
HOLY COW!

Try some Gonotopus bovinii and you'll find out.

Cheers

RC

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From: Taylor <taylorholzer at yahoo.com> on 2018.08.14 at 14:44:32(23972)
It really depends on the climate. Where I live I don’t believe any could become an issue. I was warned about Pinellia pedatisecta, but it hasn’t spread anywhere on its own. I have been propagating and spreading it around my gardens since I believe 2011.

On Aug 14, 2018, at 4:36 PM, D. Christopher Rogers wrote:

Arum italicum is an invasive in coastal California. I have read a few times that Gonatopus boivini is invasive in the southeastern US.

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From: Michael Kolaczewski <mjkolaffhbc at sbcglobal.net> on 2018.08.14 at 19:30:06(23976)
Greetings,

Pinellia has yet to show up here in Illinois

( I believe )

There are escapes of Pond Plants, and aquarium plants from time to time, Pistia Among them.

So far, our winters, and below zero F seem to be holding off some, but not all of these submerged or emerged plants, but that could change over time.

MJK

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From: Tom Croat <Thomas.Croat at mobot.org> on 2018.08.14 at 19:31:15(23977)
While it is true that if you introduce Pinellia you have it forever. It does invade beds that you don’t till every year but it does not persist in my Canna beds. Where it does come up it forms
a nice look all growing to the same height. It does get in to my liriope bed but is easy to pull up every month or so.

Tom

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From: Taylor <taylorholzer at yahoo.com> on 2018.08.14 at 21:07:57(23980)
Peter, that’s a beautiful plant!

How tall is it? Looks like it would make a nice addition to a large terrarium.

I might need to find one.

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From: Michael Kolaczewski <mjkolaffhbc at sbcglobal.net> on 2018.08.14 at 22:04:57(23981)
Peter -

That’s impressive and troubling.

Are there control measures ( mechanical

Removal or product application ) that are effective or have success of suppression ?

Michael

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From: Peter Boyce <phymatarum at gmail.com> on 2018.08.14 at 22:48:50(23982)
Michael,
The only effective method is mechanical removal over a successive period.

Peter

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From: Peter Boyce <phymatarum at gmail.com> on 2018.08.14 at 18:36:11(23983)

Homalomena expedita growth after 18 months from one piece of stolon.

On Wed, 15 Aug 2018, 07:35 Steve Marak, wrote:

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From: James Waddick <jwaddick at kc.rr.com> on 2018.08.15 at 06:05:22(23984)
Hi Steve,

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From: a sunjian <asjbiotek at gmail.com> on 2018.08.15 at 07:41:03(23986)
Whether or not a species becomes invasive definitely depends on the environment and climate (and especially the temperatures as you mentioned below)

Outside the Araceae, I know that cogongrass (Impereta cylindrica) is extremely invasive in subtropical and tropical regions around the world, but there is a variety here in the northeast USA that is valued as an ornamental called Japanese Blood Grass:

http://plantinfo.co.za/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/Imperata-cylindrica-%E2%80%98Re.jpg

Unfortunately, it's the same species, and it has been shown that the variety will revert back to the all-green form and become invasive when grown in an environment more conducive to its tropical nature.

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From: Theodore Held <oppenhauser2001 at gmail.com> on 2018.08.15 at 11:07:29(23987)
I just finished an experiment with Pistia here in Michigan. Michigan State University and our local garden park called Belle Isle both list it as invasive. So, last spring (2017) I planted a 5-gallon pail with some (and one other aquatic species, which was also condemned as invasive) and included a few clay pots near the water surface so that they could seek out substrate with their roots. The pail was then "planted" such that its rim was about 3-4 inches above the soil line. Over last summer, both species definitely grew profusely. But then, when the temperatures began to slide below freezing, both species took a turn for the worse. This past spring the Pistia were already gone to mush. The other species had a few weak strands of their stems, but those decayed and disappeared over a few weeks. Now it's August and there is absolutely no trace of either.

Do they grow well when conditions are right? Yes, definitely. Are they "invasive" in climates that freeze? It does not look that way, at least not in Michigan where freezing is robust over many months. It would seem that calling a species invasive would require that it be able to survive year-round in a specific climate/location.

I do also have an Arum italicum and it survives our winters just fine. I clip off the seeds before they ripen and submerge them in boiling water. They do not survive boiling. The parent plants grow pretty well here, but I don't know how well they have to grow before they are judged as "invasive." In my yard, the native Jack-in-a-pulpit is a weed. I have a hundred blooms each spring on my quarter acre lot. And they pop up everywhere. Most local gardeners are jealous. Is that invasive? It is a native.

Ted Held.

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From: "D. Christopher Rogers" <branchiopod at gmail.com> on 2018.08.15 at 11:36:30(23988)
Hiyer, Ted!

So . . . does the freezing kill the seeds as well?

I do know that Pistia survives in many places that freeze, if there is industrial activities that warm the water in the immediate area, or if there is some sort of surface water mechanical agitation to keep the area clear of ice. But none of those places freeze as hard or as long as you guys do in Michigan.

Regardless of several different legal definitions, an invasive species does not have to be an alien. There are native invasive species as well. Invasive taxa are species that quickly take advantage of an open niche, and rapidly overwhelm the habitat with their numbers. Duckweed is invasive here in Kansas, but it is also native. Feral pigeons are non-native invasive species, but Mourning Dove, which is native here, can become invasive around the local granaries, where there is no cover for predators that might reduce their numbers.

Happy days,

Christopher

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From: a sunjian <asjbiotek at gmail.com> on 2018.08.15 at 11:52:29(23990)
"
It would seem that calling a species invasive would require that it be able to survive year-round in a specific climate/location."

Nice experiment!

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From: Peter Boyce <phymatarum at gmail.com> on 2018.08.15 at 21:34:03(23991)
Hello Taylor

In full sun it gets to 30cm tall; in shade about 1 m.

How many plants do you want, I can mail you a small one v easily.

Peter

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From: Danielle Frohlich <dsfrohlich at gmail.com> on 2018.08.16 at 12:11:19(23992)
Hi, all-
The following species have been collected in Hawaii spreading from cultivation... whether or not they are showing invasive tendencies is another question:

Aglaonema commutatum

Alocasia cucullata

Alocasia macrorrhizos

Anthurium pentaphyllum (spreading in a botanical garden)

Caladium bicolor

Dieffenbachia maculata

Epipremnum pinnatum

Philodendron erubescens

Philodendron lacerum

Philodendron pinnatifidum

Philodendron scandens
Philodendron scandens K.Koch & Sello ssp. scandens f. micans (spreading in a botanical garden)

Pistia stratiotes

Syngonium podophyllum

Xanthosoma robustum

Zantedeschia aethiopica

Aloha,

Danielle

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