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  Dracontium amazonense
From: southernshade at juno.com (Jerry R Hooper) on 1998.04.30 at 16:27:01(2064)
I have many tubercules of Dracontium amazonense. I am interested in
trading these for other species of Dracontium or Amorphophallus or other
interesting aroids. If anyone would like to trade, Please drop me a
line. Jerry Hooper southernshade@juno.com

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From: "D. Scott Taylor" staylor at brevardparks.com> on 2006.03.29 at 12:23:27(14011)
Hello all: I have growing the above species for a few years and can't quite figure out patterns of dormancy.? My larger tuber (flowering age) goes dormant in the fall, but many of the smaller ones do not.? Growth declines in the fall, the petioles collapse, but remain green and cannot be pulled from the tuber, and then new growth resumes in warmer weather: so there is no real dormancy.? I am in central Florida.? Any ideas/insights?dstOn Mar 29, 2006, at 12:15 PM, Denis Rotolante wrote: We have grown P. verrucosum in the nursery but never any large numbers. Like so many plants which originate in a cloud forest type environment it does not appreciate our Summer heat and always grows much better in the cooler Fall Winter and Spring Months. In the summer it stops growing and just stares back at you when you walk by. It is hard to root the cuttings so we lay the vines out on a tray of chopped sphagnum moss so they can grow roots at the nodes into the sphagnum. ? Denis ___________________________________________
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From: "E.Vincent Morano" <ironious2 at yahoo.com> on 2009.09.30 at 23:03:30(20118)
I have a Dracontium amazonense that I wrote about before. Now it has grown a new leaf alongside the one it had all season. I thought these grew durring the year and then went dormant for the winter months. So first should it be growing a new leaf (a bigger one at that) and second when should/how should I let /make it go dormant?
Thank you.

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From: "plantguy at zoominternet.net" <plantguy at zoominternet.net> on 2009.10.01 at 09:12:56(20122)
Hi Vincent,

None of my various Dracontium ever go dormant for very long and certainly
not on any schedule that I can figure out. Think of them like a nearly
evergreen Amorph and you've got the idea. Keep them growing nearly year
'round and when they feel like taking a break they will. At that point
keep them barely damp until a new growth emerges and then go back to your
typical watering schedule. They often grow multiple petioles without any
rest period and often have many petioles at the same time so this is
normal. There are some wonderful pics on the IAS site showing various
species with huge numbers of petioles all at the same time. Sounds like
yours is happy :o)

Dan

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From: "D. Scott Taylor" <scott.taylor at brevardparks.com> on 2009.10.01 at 12:34:11(20126)
I have had this species for some time, and I see no pattern to dormancy, which sometimes never occurs, at least here in Florida. I have heard that drying them out will induce dormancy, but have never tried this?
dst

On Oct 1, 2009, at 2:03 AM, E.Vincent Morano wrote:

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From: <ju-bo at msn.com> on 2009.10.01 at 13:36:14(20130)
Dear Vincent and Scott,

Some species of tuberous aroids, even in genera such as Amorphophallus, Dracontium and Arisaema, in which  most species in GENERAL go dormant, have species which grow in perpetually ''wet'' areas, these do no NEED to go dormant.  Let the species name ''amazonense'' tip you off!   There seldom is a dry period in the Amazon region where this species occurs naturally!   There are a few other species of Dracontium (D. spruceanum comes to mind) which can be grown year-long with no dormant period.  One can ''force'' dormancy by letting the pot dry out, but most growers would not recomend this.  The late Lynn Hannon was one who had them grow all year, keeping them moist.

Good Growing,

Julius

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From: ALLAN TETZLAFF <atetzlaff at rogers.com> on 2009.10.01 at 15:27:47(20132)
I have a couple of these and mine rarely go dormant - and when they do, it's not for very long.....

From: E.Vincent Morano
To: Discussion of aroids

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From: "E.Vincent Morano" <ironious2 at yahoo.com> on 2009.10.01 at 23:08:05(20135)
Is a dormant period required for a flower?

I refuse to participate in the in the recession.

--- On Thu, 10/1/09, ju-bo@msn.com wrote:

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From: "D. Scott Taylor" <scott.taylor at brevardparks.com> on 2009.10.02 at 09:58:11(20138)
Further re. this very interesting species: the VERY long time it takes for tubercles to sprout: any tips on speeding this up? I have had them in-soil and viable for almost 2 years with no action!
dst

On Oct 1, 2009, at 6:27 PM, ALLAN TETZLAFF wrote:

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From: <ju-bo at msn.com> on 2009.10.04 at 05:37:27(20153)
Dear Friends,

My thoughts on this interesting question are that no, when the plant reaches some point in its growth cycle, even without dormancy, it will bloom.   This is NOT a  tested and proven fact, just my opinion!
Wilbert, your thoughts??

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From: "Daniel Devor" <plantguy at zoominternet.net> on 2009.10.05 at 04:36:55(20155)
I can say that my various Dracontium (prancei, polyphyllum, 2 no-IDs from Brasil, 1 no-ID from Ecuador (too young) and one no-ID from who knows where) that I have had for between 3 and 5 years (with a couple of exceptions) have never flowered except the prancei once after a dormancy. They have all stayed virtually evergreen except for maybe a month here and there (3 dormant now) and so far no influorescence. The prancei has produced a nice petiole this summer in nearly full sun that is 1.3 m tall and the largest polyphyllum has a petiole approximately 0.8 m tall and still emerging (this is the second petiole on the tuber after a short dormancy). Mine obviously rarely flower, and this could be my growing conditions, but honestly, just like Amorphs, I think the petiole and leaf is the real reason to grow them :o)

I really wish this genus was more widely grown so we could all try a few additional species!! I find the offsets very tough, but once they get a bit of size on them I find them to be quite enjoyable even in my zone 6, no GH conditions. If anyone ever has any tubers they can spare I'd love to hear about them :o)

Dan

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