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Year
Vol.
(Issue)
Pages
Author(s)
Title
1980
3(2)
56-57
Fanny Lee Phillips On coping with monster
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 ABSTRACT: There are a number of ways of coexisting with monsters. One of them is to throw a party and invite the monster to be the guest of honor. During the years, Amorphophallus rivieri parties have come to be a Phillips family tradition.
1981
4(2)
43-53
Josef Bogner Amorphophallus titanum (Becc.) Becc. ex Arcangeli (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: The biggest flower in the plant kingdom is produced by the parasitic Rafflesia (Rafflesiaceae), which · can reach up to nearly 1 m in diameter; this genus is distributed in Southeast Asia. The biggest inflorescences (consisting of many single flowers) are probably in the palms and, depending on how one looks at it, the bamboos. But the genus Amorphophallus of the aroids has the biggest unbranched inflorescences in the plant kingdom.
1981
4(3)
102
 Anonymous Errata
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1981
4(4)
109-113
Prof. Dr. W. Barthlott, Josef Bogner Rediscovery of Amorphophallus staudtii (Engl.) N. E. Br. in the Tai National Park (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: The genus Amorphophallus Bl. ex Decne. is distributed in the palaeotropics with nearly one hundred species. One very rare taxon, Amorphophallus staudtii (Engl.) N.E.Br. wasrediscovered by the first author (W .B.) in the Ivory Coast 81 years after the first and only collection in the Cameroons. A detailed description and illustrations of the species and its natural habitat are given.
1982
5(3)
67-88
Dan H. Nicholson Translation of Engler's classification of Araceae with updating (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: When Hooker (1883) was preparing the treatment of Araceae (Aroideae) for the monumental 'Genera Plantarum,' he basically followed the Schottian system, incorporating Engler's (1879) reduction in the number of genera. The first system was "popularized" by Hutchinson (1959) who, with a reversal of the sequence (bisexual genera first), published essentially an English translation of Hooker's latin. Engler (1905-1920), in his monumental 'Das Pflanzenreich', produced his final treatment of the family, including all then known species in nine volumes. This work remains the standard reference for the family as a whole.
1982
5(4)
102
Joe Wright Queries
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 ABSTRACT: Questions? Comments! Have you something to ask or say? This format will be devoted to your needs. All inquiries will receive equal attention. Responses are made to the writer and those subjects having general member interest will be treated in the journal.
1983
6(4)
129-132
F. D. Ghani Ornamental and edible aroids of peninsular Malaysia (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Most aroids are widely distributed in the tropics and subtropics with a few species in temperate regions. The majority occur in the countries of South East Asia, South and Central America, Africa and the West Indies. The family has a total of 110 genera and ca. 2500 species (Croat, 1979), 92% of which are in South East Asia and Central and South America. In Malaysia alone there are 23 native genera and about 120 species (Henderson, 1954).
1983
6(4)
160
Joe Wright Queries
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1984
7(1)
6
David Prudhomme Photograph: Amorphophallus konjac Koch
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1984
7(1)
7-8
Dan H. Nicholson Amorphophallus konjac vs A. rivieri (Araceae)
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 ABSTRACT: A quick scan of the literature suggested that A. rivieri was correct, cf. Fanny Lee Phillips (Aroideana 3: 56. 1980). I began to wonder why Koyama (in Ohwi, Flora of Japan, 255. 1965) accepted A. konjac. To my astonishment, I found that it is correct. Even more astonishing, I found that I had prepared notes on the problem in 1963 (while a student at the Bailey Hortorium, Cornell University), including copies of critical papers from Dr. George S. Bunting. At the risk of repeating something possibly published elsewhere, I report my findings in a historial sequence.
1984
7(2)
35
David Prudhomme Photograph: Amorphophallus bulbifer....
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1984
7(2)
52
L. Garner, David Prudhomme Photograph: Amorphophallus bulbifer inflorescence
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1985
8(1)
14-25
Josef Bogner, S. J. Mayo, C. Sathish Kumar New species and changing concepts in Amorphophallus (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: The reduction of Thomsonia Wallich (1830) to the synonymy of Amorphophallus Blume ex Decaisne (1834), nom. cons. is discussed, along with the resultant renaming of Amorphophallus napalensis and Amorphophallus sumawongii. Amorphophallus pendulus is described. Pseudodracontium and Plesmonium are also discussed.
1985
8(3)
70-71
W. S. Peckover Seed dispersal of Amorphophallus paeoniifolius by birds of paradise in Papua New Guinea
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 ABSTRACT: A Magnificent Riflebird is reported as having eaten the fruits and regurgitated the seed of Amorphophallus paeoniifolius (Dennst.) Nicolson in captivity in Papua New Guinea. A Glossymantled Manucode Bird of Paradise was also observed leaving a fruiting head of the same plant species in the wild.
1985
8(3)
73-79
Josef Bogner One new name and five new combinations in Araceae (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Cercestis mirabilis (N.E. Br.) Bogner, comb. nov., Cercestis camerunensis (Ntepe) Bogner, Comb. nov., Homalomena engleri Bogner, nom. nov., Amorphophallus coudercii (Bogner) Bogner, comb. nov., Dracontium regelianum (Engl.) Bogner, comb. nov., and Nephthytis hallaei (Bogner) Bogner, comb. nov. are described.
1987
10(1)
23-24
Joe Wright Queries
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 ABSTRACT: Two questions on Amorphophallus hardiness and dormancy are answered.
1987
10(2)
4-16
Josef Bogner Morphological variation in aroids (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: The Araceae or aroid., are a large family of about 2400 species, grouped in 107 genera and these again in nine subfamilies. The aroids are mainly a tropical family and are distributed world-wide. They show great variation in their morphological characters, which will be described in this paper along with some other data.
1987
10(2)
16
John Banta Photography: Amorphophallus paeoniifolius (Dennst.) Nicolson
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1987
10(3)
25
John Banta Photograph: Amorphophallus paeoniifolius (Dennst.) Nicolson
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1987
10(3)
26-28
Leslie Paul Nyman, Joseph Arditti Tissue culture and micropropagation of Amorphophallus paeoniifolius (Dennst.) Nicolson
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 ABSTRACT: The tissue culture techniques described here are suitable for the edible form of Amorphophallus paeoniifolius var. hortensis and were modified from work with tissue culture of taro Jackson Ball and Arditti, 1977); Irawati, and Webb, in press).
1988
11(1)
4-9
Li Hen, Long Chun-lin New taxa of Amorphophallus from China (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Amorphophallus pingbianensis H. Li et C. L. Long, sp. nov. and Amorphophallus nanus H. Li et C. L. Long, sp. nov. are described.
1988
11(1)
14-19
Alistair Hay Amorphophallus (Araceae) in Australasia (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Amorphophallus galbra F. M. Bailey is recorded from New Guinea for the first time. A. angustilobus F. M. Bailey is a synonym. A. variabilis Bl. is noted from the Tanimbar Islands.
1988
11(2)
23-31
Fanny Lee Phillips Amorphophallus species and their distribution Part 1 (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Amorphophallus Blume ex Decaisne is a genus of about one hundred species of herbaceous plants of the Old World tropics and subtropics. Cultivation, distribution and more are discussed.
1988
11(3)
4-55
Thomas B. Croat Ecology and life forms of Araceae (Buy Back Issue)
 ABSTRACT: The most interesting aspect of the family's ecology is the diversity of adaptive life forms. These range from submerged to free-floating, and emergent aquatics to terrestrial plants and to epilithic or epiphytic forms which may be true epiphytes or hemiepiphytic (growing on trees but rooted in soil). Hemiepiphytism is diverse itself, with some species beginning their lives as terrestrial seedlings, then growing skototropically (toward darkness) until they arrive at the nearest suitable tree ( usually a relatively large one which casts a darker shadow) where a physiological change takes place allowing them to grow toward light (Strong & Ray, 1975). They grow as appressed epiphytes on trees or as vines in the canopy. Others begin their lives as true epiphytes, some reconverting to hemiepiphytes by producing long, dangling roots contacting the forest floor below.
1989
12(1)
4
 Anonymous Errata
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1989
12(1)
32-37
C. Sathish Kumar, T. Sabu Beetle-pollination--Cantharophily--in Amorphophallus hohenackeri (Araceae) (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: The beetle, Haptoncurina motschulskii (Reitter) Jelinek (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae) is found to be an effective agent of cantharophily in AmorphophalIus hohenackeri (Schott) Engl. et Gehrm., an endemic of Southwest India. Detailed observations on the floral characters and the pollination mechanism are given.
1992
15
17-18
John H. Johnston Please take it home
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 ABSTRACT: I guess most people who grow and/or show plants have a funny or strange story or two that they share with friends. I have one that I've been asked to share with the reade rs of Aroideana.
1993
16
5-11
Julius O. Boos, Hans E. Boos Additions to the aroid flora of Trinidad with notes on their probable origins and uses (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: These notes are based on collections and observations commencing in July 1988, when the senior author visited his homeland. They document recent discoveries of both native and introduced species of aroids and attempt where possible to explain reasons for some of the introductions.
1993
16
37-46
Gitte Peterson Chromosome numbers of the genera Araceae (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: An overview of the chromosome numbers of the genera of Araceae is given.
1994
17
18-32
James R. Symon Amorphophallus titanum: A journey beyond its habitat (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Dr. James Symon travels throughout Southeast Asia in search of Amorphophallus titanum.
1994
17
61-77
Wilbert L. A. Hetterscheid Sumatran Amorphophallus Adventures: 20 August-1 September 1993 (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Report on a trip to Indonesia in the company of Sir David Attenborough.
1995
18
5-20
Shri Niwas Singh, Madhav Gadgil Ecology of Amorphophallus species in Uttara Kannada District of the Karnataka State (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Several Amorphophallus species are cultivated for their edible tubers. Nine of their congenerics are present in the Western Ghats. The abundance, spatial distribution patterns, and ecology of these species were studied. Based on abundance the habitat preference for these species in decreasing order is as follows: open scrub, mesa, Acacia auriculiformis plantations, disturbed evergreen forests, cashew and eucalyptus plantations, casuarina plantations, and betelnut orchards. Within a particular habitat, the spatial distribution patterns were clumped. The reasons behind such clumping could lie in their dispersal, reproductive ecology, and species associations. The implications of such distribution patterns on in situ conservation measures for these plant species are discussed. AmorphophalIus species seem to be plants of humid habitats preferring an intermediate level of dis· turbance but not large scale habitat transformations. Large scale habitat transformations seem to be breaking their ecological links with their pollinators and dispersal agents resulting in reduction of their populations.
1995
18
32-39
Dorothy C. Bay Thermogenesis in aroids (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Thermogenesis, as it occurs in the plant inflorescence has been observed and studied for over two centuries. At least seven thermogenic families of plants are known including Annonaceae, Araceae, Arecaceae, Aristolochiaceae, Cycadaceae, Cyclanthaceae, and Nymphaeaceae. The sequence of thermogenic events is very precise and highly synchronized in each species. The physiology is not well understood, but the recent identification of salicylic acid as the triggering hormone for thermogenesis has opened the door for further research, especially in the areas of plant signal transduction pathways and systemically acquired resistances. Thermogenesis has proven to be an advantageous process to plants for maximizing pollination and limiting hybridization. Beetle pollinators also benefit from the phenomenon.
1995
18
40-45
K. S. Patil, G. B. Dixit Cytological studies in Araceae Part 1 (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: The largely tropical monocot family Araceae, comprising about 105 genera and 3,500 species in the world (Li Heng, 1993), is an apparently natural and easily recognizable group. In Western Ghats of Maharashtra (India), the taxa of AIaceae are thriving well in both plains and hilly regions. The plants belonging to AIaceae are taxonomically interesting, showing varied habitats. The aim of the present work is to obtain chromosome data of as many hitherto unstudied genera as possible. The cytological work of AIaceae is well known. The chromosome numbers have so far been determined for more than 700 species from intraspecific taxa (Petersen, 1989, 1993) belonging to 99 of the 105 genera presently recognized (Bogner & Nicolson, 1991; Hay, 1992; Li Heng & Hay, 1992) _ The present study reports the chromosome numbers of nine species for the first time.
1996
19
7-131
Wilbert L. A. Hetterscheid, Stephen Ittenbach Everything you always wanted to know about Amorphophallus (Buy Back Issue)
 ABSTRACT: Amorphophallus history, taxonomy, horticulture, ecology and more is discussed, including individual treatments of most species. A key to the species is presented.
1996
19
132-137
Wilbert L. A. Hetterscheid, Dilip De Sarker Notes on Amorphophallus (Araceae)--9. Amorphophallus ({Plesmonium) margaritifer (Roxb.) Kunth in profile (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: In 1993, the second author was able to collect living specimens of this most interesting species of Amorphophallus and donated material for cultivation to Kew and to the first author. The Kew material was kindly sent to the first author for cultivation and flowered in 1995. This is the first time ever that living material of this species could be studied and documented. The results are presented here.
1996
19
139-140
S. (Bas) van Balen Amorphophallus Swansong?
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 ABSTRACT: During a four day visit in April, 1995 to the protection forest (hutan lindung) on the south and west slopes of Mt. Karang above the village Salam (Pandeglang, W. Java), a number of flowering specimens of Amorpbopballus muelleri were seen which are described below.
1997
20
11-12
Dilip De Sarker, Wilbert L. A. Hetterscheid Notes on Amorphophallus (Araceae)
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 ABSTRACT: A recent collection of Amorphophallus margaritiferand its subsequent cultivation (Hetterscheid & De Sarker, 1996) made it possible to study some cytological details of this remarkable species. The species is widely known as Ptesmonium margaritij er (Roxb.) Schott but has been reclassified in Amorphophallus sect. Rhaphiophallus (Bogner et at., 1985; Hetterscheid et al., 1994). The present short communication reports the chromosome number of A. margaritifer and a comparison is made to other species of A. sect. Rhaphiophallus.
1998
21
4-7
Craig M. Allen Amorphophallus titanum (Becc.) Becc. ex Arcang. (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Only 5 years old from seed and Amorpbopballus titanum (Becc.) Becc. ex Arcang. FC 931146B flowers in captivity. Its flowering and history is described.
1998
21
22
 Anonymous Erratum
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 ABSTRACT: Aroideana Volume 19, pages 13, 32, and 141: Author names cited for Amorpbopballus albus should read Liu & Chen.
1998
21
26-145
Thomas B. Croat History and current status of systemic research with Araceae (Buy Back Issue)
 ABSTRACT: This paper will cover all systematic and floristic work that deals with Araceae which is known to me. It will not, in general, deal with agronomic papers on Araceae such as the rich literature on taro and its cultivation, nor will it deal with smaller papers of a technical nature or those dealing with pollination biology. It will include review papers on technical subjects and all works, regardless of their nature, of current aroid researchers. It is hoped that other reviews will be forthcoming which will cover separately the technical papers dealing with anatomy, cytology, physiology, palenology, and other similar areas and that still another review will be published on the subject of pollination biology of Araceae and the rich literature dealing with thermogenesis.
1998
21
74-75
Jim Donovan Photograph: Amorphophallus titanum (Becc.) Becc. ex Arcang. At Fairchild Tropical Garden
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 ABSTRACT: In Full Color
1999
22
10-19
Cristiana Giordano Observations on Amorphophallus titanum (Becc.) Becc. ex Archangeli in the forest of Sumatra (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: On the occasion of the centenary of the death of Odoardo Beccari the Botanical Garden of Florence organised two expeditions in Sumatra (in September 1994 and 1995) to study Amorphopballus titanum in nature and bring it to Florence to try to grow it. In the course of the two expeditions eight inflorescences and four infructescences were found. The inflorescences were at various stages of development and it was possible to sketch a general outline of the flowering process. We will give a detailed description only of the specimen which we observed minute by minute as its blossomed. For the others we will just list the most significant characteristics.
2001
24
94-99
V. Abdul Jeleel, C. Sathish Kumar Amorphophallus mysorensis E. Barnes & C. E. C. Fisch. (Amorphophallus sect. Raphiophallus) (Araceae) in India with notes on related species (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Amorphophallus mysorensis E. Barnes & C. E. C. Fisch. (Araceae) has been recollected from its type locality after more than 60 years. The present paper provides a detailed description and illustrations of vegetative and floral parts of the species based on the recent collection, together with an overview of Amorphophallus sect. Raphiophallus in India.
2002
25
78-87
R. S. Misra, M. Nedunchezhiyan, T. M. S. Swamy, S. Edison Mass multiplication techniques for producing quality planting material of Amorphophallus paeoniifolius (Dennst.) Nicolson (Araceae) (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Amorphophallus paeoniifolius (Dennst.) Nicolson (Araceae), commonly known as Elephant foot yam, is a high-potential tropical tuber crop. The tubers are a delicacy and rich in nutrients. In India, the cultivar 'Gajendra' is the most popular with non-acrid orange-colored flesh and with a yield potential of 50-60 Metric tons/hectare (tlha). This crop can be grown in other countries also where climatic conditions are suitable. In order to popularize this crop, a huge quantity of planting material is required. The planting material is either small whole tubers or bigger tubers cut into smaller pieces before planting. A large mass multiplication program to produce quality planting material of Elephant foot yam is in operation at our Centre. The mass multiplication techniques were improved and standardized. For commercial cultivation of Elephant foot yam, whole tubers of approximately 400-500 g size with plant to plant and row to row spacing of 90 X 90 cm, were found ideal. To obtain 400-500 g size whole tubers for commercial cultivation, cut tubers of approximately 50-100 g with a plant to plant and row to row spacing of 60 X 60 cm were found suitable for raising the crop for producing the planting material. Major diseases that collectively cause considerable damage to the crop, viz. Mosaic, collar rot, leaf blight and post harvest tuber rot, can be effectively checked by using disease-free planting material. Planting material used for raising the crop for the production of planting material for commercial crop should always be obtained from mosaic free crop and devoid of any post harvest spoilage. A fertilizer dose of 100:80:100 kg/ha of NPK was found to be optimum for raising the crop for commercial cultivation or for producing planting material. Preventive crop protection with two sprays of Mancozeb (0.02%) + Monocrotophos (0.05%) at 60 and 90 days after planting was found very effective. The crop raised for producing the planting material should be harvested only after full maturity and complete drying of the plants. Tuber yields of 30-40 t/ha can be obtained from the crop raised for producing the planting material whereas tuber yield of 50-60 t/ha can be obtained from commercial crop.
2003
26
42-53
R. S. Misra, S. Sriram, M. Nedunchezhiyan, C. Mohandas Field and storage diseases of Amorphophallus and their management (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Amorphophallus, commonly known as elephant foot yam or Suran is a dual-purpose aroid ideal for ornamental as well as cultivation purposes. While the plants of all species have ornamental value, tubers of some species are rich source of nutrition and a delicacy as food. Tubers and plants are also used in preparing indigenous medicines for various ailments. The amorphophallus crop has high production potential and market acceptability. Three major field diseases affect the plants; mosaic caused by virus, leaf blight/leaf rot by Phytophthora colocasiae and collar rot by Sclerotium rolfsii. Major field diseases of amorphophallus can be effectively controlled by using disease-free planting material, mulching with paddy straw/plant leaves/black polythene sheets and two preventive sprays with Mancozeb (0.2%) + Monocrotophos (0.05%) at 60 and 90 days after planting. The tubers are also prone to post-harvest damage as a result of infection by various fungi and bacteria coupled with nematode infestation. Tubers infested with Meloidogyne incognita are prone to post-harvest diseases caused by Sclerotium rolfsii, Botryodiplodia theobromae, Phytophthora co!ocasiae, Fusarium and Rhizopus species. A bacterial pathogen, Erwinia carotovora also causes serious soft rot decay of tubers. Storing the tubers by spreading them closely in single layer and covering with coarse dry sand in a cool and ventilated place, followed by periodic removal of damaged tubers/portions, if any, was found to be the best method of storage that allowed minimum decay and weight loss.
2003
26
113-119
Wilbert L. A. Hetterscheid Notes on the genus Amorphophallus 12: Three new species from tropical Asia (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Three new species of Amorphophallus from Asia are described. Their morphological similarities to other species are discussed: Amorphophallus operculatus, Amorphophallus sinuatus, and Amorphophallus vogelianus
2005
28
191-196
Chunlin Long, Heng Li, W. Chen Amorphophallus in China: How many? (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: The species diversity of Amorphophallus in China was studied and revised in the present paper. Twenty-five years after the publication of the Araceae in Flora Reipublicae Popularis Sinicae, the species number of Amorphophallus has been increased from 6 to 23. Among these 23 known species, 11 are endemic to China and 12 are edible. The distribution of Amorpbopballus is uneven in China, with Yunnan the richest province in species diversity of the genus.
2005
28
197-200
S. Bartlett Titan Arum - Big AL from Sydney (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: On Wednesday the 6th of October 2004 the Royal Botanic Gardens Sydney flowered their first Titan Arum, Amorphphophallus Titanum, only the second flowering in Australia behind Cairns in 2003. In the following paragraphs is a brief discussion of the Sydney Gardens history cultivating the Titan, techniques and growing conditions that finally led to our magnificent flowering.
2006
29
44-52
Wilbert L. A. Hetterscheid, Ralph D. Mangelsdorff Notes on the genus Amorphophallus 14. New species from Madagascar (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Two new species of the genus Amorphophallus (Araceae) are described from Madagascar: Amorphophallus andranogidroensis Hett. & Mangelsdorff sp. nov. and Amorphophallus erythrorrhachis Hett. ,O. Pronk & R. Kaufmann sp. nov. An updated key to the Malagasy species is presented.
2006
29
53-79
Wilbert L. A. Hetterscheid Notes on the genus Amorphophallus 15. New species from SE Asia (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Fourteen new species of the genus Amorphophallus are described from SE Asia, based mainly on material in existing living collections. The affinities of the species to existing ones are discussed. Amorphophallus croatii, A. fuscus, A. gallowayi, A. glaucophyllus, A. josefbogneri, A. laoticus, A. lunatus, A. mysuroides, A. ongsakulii, A. prolificus, A. reflexus, A. schmidtiae, A. serrulatus and A. tuberculatus.
2007
30
98-107
K. M. Aravinthan, R. Kamalakanna, V. Narmatha Bai Callus induction and high frequency shoot regeneration in Amorphophallus smithsonianus Sivadasan -- an aroid endemic to India (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Amorphophallus smithsonianus Sivadasan, an aroid endemic to Agasthiyamalai in the Western Ghats of Tamil Nadu, India, was selected for the present study. Investigations were undertaken for mass multiplication using tissue culture techniques. Among the different explants tested for in vitro culture, the laminar segments proved to be the best. MS medium supplemented with 2,4-D (2 mg/l) and L-glutamine (800 mgll) was found to be the best combination for induction of the callus forming the laminar tissue. Greening of the callus was best achieved in MS medium supplemented With SAP (2 mg/l}and adenine sulfate (30 mgll). Shoot-bud regeneration was achieved in MS medium supplemented with BAP (1 mgll) KIN (O.5 mgll) and adenine sulfate (30 mg/ 1). GA3 was found to be essential for the elongation of the shoot buds. MS + BAP (2mg/I) + KIN (0.5 mg/l) and AC (1g/1) proved to be the best combination for inducing maximum number of shoots from the green callus.
2007
30
124-138
Tony Avent Propagation of Amorphophallus by leaf petiole cuttings (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: It is our hope to expand the available information with regards to amorphophallus propagation by leaf petiole cuttings based on our experiments between 2004 and 2006. Leaf petiole propagation is certainly not a new idea but one that we felt deserved a more systematic experiment to refine our knowledge of the subject.
2008
31
125-128
M. Sankaran, N. P. Singh, M. Nedunchezhiyan, B. Santhosh, Chander Datt Amorphophallus muelleri Blume (Araceae): An edible species of elephant foot yam in tribal areas of Tripura (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Tripura has a warm and humid Subtropical climate with three distinct seasons; summer, monsoon and winter. Rice is the staple crop but many other foodstuffs are cultivated or collected from the wild. The number includes numerous aroids. Two elephant foot yams are widely used, but their identity had not previously been established. This paper describes A. muelleri Blume, A. paeoniijolius (Dennst.) Nicholson and indigenous tribal knowledge (ITK) in the utilization of A. muelleri as food and medicine.
2008
31
129-133
M. Nedunchezhiyan, R. S. Misra Amorphophallus tubers invaded by Cynodon dactylon (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Amorphophallus paeoniifolius tubers are rich in starch and are consumed as vegetables after boiling or baking. Cynodon dactylon (Bermudagrass) a common weed in cultivated as well as non-cultivated fields was found invading on the underground tubers during dry season. It was found that Cynodon dactylon injected needle-sharp root-like runners produced at the nodes into the tubers. In some tubers Cynodon dactylon root-like runners entered inside up to 15 em depth. Necrotic lesions were developed in the infected tubers around the Cynodon dactylon rootlike runners. The dry matter content of Cynodon-infested tubers was decreased due to decrease of starch and total sugars. The anti-nutritional factor, oxalic acid content, was increased in Cynodon-infested tubers. Cynodon dactylon rendered Amorpbopballus tubers unfit for human consumption.
2008
31
144-147
C. Cotterel Propagation of Amorphophallus titanum by leaf petiole cuttings (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: I recently undertook a propagation project as a student of horticulture; this paper covers my investigation, carried out at The Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, to begin a propagation protocol for Amorphophallus titanum by leaf petiole cuttings, by investigating the most suitable substrate for the cuttings.
2009
32
8-18
Josef Bogner The genus Zomicarpella N. E. Br. (Araceae) (Buy)
2009
32
132-135
Shrirang R. Yadav, V. I. Kahalkar, S. M. Bhuskute A new species of Amorphophallus Bl. ex Decne. (Araceae) from Bhandara District, Maharashtra State, India (Buy)
2009
32
136-141
C. Sathish Kumar, V. A. Jaleel Amorphophallus bognerianus (Araceae), a new species from India (Buy)
2009
32
178-182
Leland Miyano Lessons from a paradise (Buy)