Your search for articles published in volume 31 has found 20 articles.

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Year
Vol.
(Issue)
Pages
Author(s)
Title
2008
31
3-14
Josef Bogner The genus Bognera Mayo and Nicolson (Araceae) (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: The genus Bognera Mayo & Nicolson with its single species Bognera recondita (Madison) Mayo & Nicolson, is described and illustrated and its relationships are discussed in detail. Discussions of its history, discovery, distribution, ecology, pollination, etymology and cultivation are given. The genus Bognera is characterized by its creeping rhizome shoot architecture with two cataphylls preceding each foliage leaf, the last one partly enveloping the petiole (a character unique in the family), the essentially parallel-pinnate venation type (philodendroid) but with third order veins in a clearly reticulate pattern, the unconstricted spathe, the stamens of each male flower connate into a synandrium, the female flowers lacking staminodes, the unilocular ovary with a single anatropous ovule on a basal placenta and the inaperturate pollen grains with smooth (psilate) exine.
2008
31
15-24
Josef Bogner, E. Marchesi Mangonia uruguaya (Hicken) Bogner (Araceae) recollected (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Mangonia uruguaya (Hicken) Bogner has been recollected in Uruguay, where it is endemic. A fuU description and illustrations are given, as well as notes on its history, distribution, etymology and relationship.
2008
31
25-42
Thomas B. Croat, David Wolfersberger, Carla V. Kostelac New species of Araceae from Western Ecuador (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Nine new species of Anthurium (Araceae) are described and illustrated: Anthurium alluriquinense Croat, A. fosteri Croat, A. iltisii Croat, A. lojtnantii Croat, A. pescadilloense Croat, A. pucayacuense Croat, A. samamaense Croat, A. sebastianense Croat and A. ventanasense.
2008
31
43-56
Thomas B. Croat, X. Delannay, Carla V. Kostelac New species of Araceae from Ecuadorian Amazonia (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Six new species of Araceae from the Amazon basin in Ecuador are described as new to science, Anthurium chacoense Croat, A. cuyabenoense Croat, A. dolichocnemum Croat, A. effusispathum Croat, A. ionanthum Croat and A. longiusculus Croat.
2008
31
57-84
Thomas B. Croat, L. Brossart, Carla V. Kostelac A revision of the 3-segmented species of Anthurium Sect. Dactylophyllium (Araceae) (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Anthurium sect. Dactylophyllium have leaf blades palmately divided into segments divided to the base and and may have 0-) 3-15 segments. Those species with 3 or fewer segments are revised here and a key is provided. Anthurium arisaemoides, A. cutucuense, A. huacamayoense, A. moonenii, A. thrinax, A. triphyllum, A. trisectum, A. warintsense and A. zuloagae.
2008
31
85-89
Eduardo G. Gonçalves, J. Barros de Carvalho Philodendron lupinum -- A new species of Araceae from northwestern Brazil (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: A new species of Philodendron (P. lupinum) is described from Acre state, Brazil. It seems to be closer to the species of subgenus Philodendron section Philodendron series Impolita Croat (P. hebetatum, P. strictum and P. thalassicum), but differs from these species by the conspicuously panduriform anterior division and for the presence of fewer ovules per locule. This new species is so far known only from the type locality.
2008
31
90-97
Z. Kvacek, Josef Bogner Twenty-million-year-old fruits and seeds of Pistia (Araceae) from central Europe (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: First fossil fruits of Pistia (Araceae, Aroideae) are reported from the Early Miocene lignite in North Bohemia. They co-occur with dispersed seeds identified as Pistia sibirica Dorofeev, a morpho-species spread in the Late Oligocene and Early to Middle Miocene deposits of western Eurasia. These fruits remain different only in smaller size from those produced by Pistia stratiotes L., a pantropic floating aquatic aroid and the only extant species of the genus.
2008
31
98-100
Yin Jian-Tao, Guy Gusman First report of Arisaema ramulosum Alderw. in China (Araceae)
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 ABSTRACT: Shortly after the publication of The "Geographical Distributions of Arisaema barbatum Buchet and Arisaema ramulosum Alderw. (Araceae)" in a previous issue of Aroideana (Gusman el al., 2007), two new distribution areas of Arisaema ramulosum came to our knowledge.
2008
31
101-106
Marc Gibernau, J. Albre Size variations of flowering characters in Arum italicum (Araceae) (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: In Arum, bigger individuals should proportionally invest more in the female function (number or weight of female flowers) than the male. The aim of this paper is to quantify variations in reproductive characters (size of the spadix parts, number of inflorescences) in relation to plant and inflorescence sizes. The appendix represents 44% of the spadix length. The female zone length represents 16.5% of the spadix length and is much longer than the male zone (6%). Moreover these three spadix zones increase with plant vigour indicating an increasing investment into reproduction and pollinator attraction. It appears that the length of appendix increased proportionally more than the lengths of the fertile zones. On average an inflorescence counts 156 male flowers and 61 female flowers which result in a male-biased floral ratio in A. italicum. The numbers of male and female flowers increased significantly with the spadix size but differently according to the gender, the number of female flowers increasing faster than male: on the other hand this effect was marginally significantly (p = .08). This relative gender difference of flower number increase is visualised by a significant decrease of the maleness floral ratio with spadix size.
2008
31
107-112
Julius O. Boos Additional notes on Philodendron xanadu (Araceae) (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Philodendmn xanadu Croat, Mayo & Boos was described in 2002 as a new species of Philodendron, and is a member of the subgenus or section Meconostigma, the "self-heading" philodendrons. In this description it is stated that this species differs from other members of the group of the subgenus by its nearly complete lack of posterior lobes on its leaf blades, and the weakly developed posterior ribs. Further observations have proven this statement to be in error, although other distinguishing characters remain. The changes that should be made in the description are laid out. The probable effects of chemicals used in the tissue culture process which affect the appearance and size of the many thousands of commercially produced specimens of this Philodendron species are briefly discussed.
2008
31
113
Josef Bogner The chromosome numbers of the aroid genera: An additional note
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 ABSTRACT: Last year we (Bogner & Petersen, 2007) published a list of the chromosome numbers of the aroid genera, but one genus, Croatiella E. G. Gons,:.(Gons,:alves, 2005), was lacking, because earlier living plants disappeared from cultivation. As expected, Croatiella integrifolia has also a chromosome number of 2n = 34, x = 17
2008
31
114-119
L. Garner A new hybrid alocasias for the 21st century (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Tropical gardening has become quite popular in recent years, and with that has come a greater demand for new and interesting tropical subjects for these gardens. The Alocasia X portora and Alocasia X calidora, first described in Aroideana Vol. 6, No. 3, have both figured prominently in many of these gardens, but since those two plants were developed, we have completed a significant amount of additional hybridizing work at Aroidia Research. Some of the new plants that have resulted from this extensive work are described and illustrated herein.
2008
31
120-123
P.M. Resslar The inflorescence of Caladium humboldtii Schott (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Both dormant (in 2003, 2005, and 2007) and actively growing tubers (in 2003) of Caladium humboldtii Schott were soaked in a 600 ppm solution of gibberellic acid (GA3) for four hours to induce the formation of inflorescences. This concentration of GA3 was toxic to the actively growing tubers. Most tubers died, with only four out of 20 surviving, and no inflorescences were formed. Dormant tubers, however, survived the treatment and most developed inflorescences. The inflorescence had a green cylindrical spathe tube and a spathe limb that was mottled green and white. The average length of a peduncle was 55.3 ± 12.6 mm, and the average length of an inflorescence was 47.8 ± 3.7 mm. The average length of the staminate, sterile, and pistillate portions of the spadix were 9.3 ± 1.3, 6.0 ± 1.4, and 3.5 ± 1.3, respectively. The average number of pistillate flowers per spadix was 20.8 ± 9.7.
2008
31
124
Guy Gusman Note on "A disjunct new population of Arisaema smitinandii S.Y. Hu (Araceae) from China"
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 ABSTRACT: In a paper that appeared in a previous issue of Aroideana (Vol. 30), the author (H. Li, 2007) extends the distribution of Arisaema smitinandii - a species originally discovered in S Thailand - to SE Xizang in China, i.e. ca. 2,300 km further to the North. Unfortunately, this conclusion is deduced on the basis of an error: the three herbarium Chinese specimens (H. Sun, Z.K. Zhou & H.Y. Yu ETM 1090, KUN!) identified as A. smitinandii by the author are the same that were used as paratypes of Arisaema tsangpoense ].T. Yin & G. Gusman (J.T. Yin & G. Gusman, 2006).
2008
31
125-128
M. Sankaran, N. P. Singh, M. Nedunchezhiyan, B. Santhosh, Chander Datt Amorphophallus muelleri Blume (Araceae): An edible species of elephant foot yam in tribal areas of Tripura (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Tripura has a warm and humid Subtropical climate with three distinct seasons; summer, monsoon and winter. Rice is the staple crop but many other foodstuffs are cultivated or collected from the wild. The number includes numerous aroids. Two elephant foot yams are widely used, but their identity had not previously been established. This paper describes A. muelleri Blume, A. paeoniijolius (Dennst.) Nicholson and indigenous tribal knowledge (ITK) in the utilization of A. muelleri as food and medicine.
2008
31
129-133
M. Nedunchezhiyan, R. S. Misra Amorphophallus tubers invaded by Cynodon dactylon (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Amorphophallus paeoniifolius tubers are rich in starch and are consumed as vegetables after boiling or baking. Cynodon dactylon (Bermudagrass) a common weed in cultivated as well as non-cultivated fields was found invading on the underground tubers during dry season. It was found that Cynodon dactylon injected needle-sharp root-like runners produced at the nodes into the tubers. In some tubers Cynodon dactylon root-like runners entered inside up to 15 em depth. Necrotic lesions were developed in the infected tubers around the Cynodon dactylon rootlike runners. The dry matter content of Cynodon-infested tubers was decreased due to decrease of starch and total sugars. The anti-nutritional factor, oxalic acid content, was increased in Cynodon-infested tubers. Cynodon dactylon rendered Amorpbopballus tubers unfit for human consumption.
2008
31
134-143
T. V. Price, Kila Poka, Gamoga Bogarei Observations on the liberation (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Mature fruit heads of Wild Type (WT) and cultivar 'Bangkok' taro (Colocasia esculenta) plants growing in East New Britain were observed with seeds liberated onto the surfaces of the fruits through holes in the berries. Drosophilid flies were often associated with these holes and were attracted to both attached and detached fruit heads, pierced the berries but did not oviposit. This is the first record of flies associated with liberation of taro seed under natural conditions. Following liberation, some seeds were deposited onto leaves of adjacent plants. Detached fruit heads of 'Bangkok' exposed at ground level, shrivelled without further seed liberation. Entire fruit heads of WT were deposited onto the soiVleaf litter surface following collapse of the peduncle. Masses of seeds were also liberated onto the leaf litter/soil surface following breakdown of the berries. Seeds of WT liberated naturally were highly viable (80% germination) and colonies of germinated seedlings were observed arising from the naturally deposited WT seed masses on the soil surface. The role of flies, other animal vectors and environment in liberation, dissemination and germination of taro seeds under natural conditions is discussed.
2008
31
144-147
C. Cotterel Propagation of Amorphophallus titanum by leaf petiole cuttings (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: I recently undertook a propagation project as a student of horticulture; this paper covers my investigation, carried out at The Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, to begin a propagation protocol for Amorphophallus titanum by leaf petiole cuttings, by investigating the most suitable substrate for the cuttings.
2008
31
148-154
A. Haigh, L. Lay, S. J. Mayo, L. Reynolds, M. Sellaro, Josef Bogner, Peter C. Boyce, Thomas B. Croat, Michael H. Grayum, R. Keating, Carla V. Kostelac, Alistair Hay, Wilbert L. A. Hetterscheid, M. Marcela Mora A new website for Araceae taxonomy on www.cate-araceae.org (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: The development and current progress of the Cate-Araceae website is described and its relation to the aroid community discussed in the context of rapidly developing initiatives to migrate traditional descriptive taxonomy onto the internet (ETaxonomy).
2008
31
155-165
Steve Lucas Improving your plant photography: The basics (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Once you begin to collect plants it is a natural extension to document your collection with a camera. And if you are doing any long term research, that documentation is even more important. Doing it well takes both practice and an understanding of the basics of photography!