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  Mark's A. titanum
From: Don Burns <burns at mobot.org> on 1997.09.06 at 19:24:06(1170)
Yikes! Mark, you have one high class problem! Now this is the kind of
problem _I_ would like to have! Does your greenhouse have a dirt floor?
The sole solution I can conjure up is to "lower" the container the plant
is in. Dig a hole to accomodate the extra growth on top.

Two questions for you:
1 - Will you please photograph this beast when it is up and send a copy
to one of us with a scanner so we can put it on the web site?
2 - For the benefit of those of us who have A. titanum, please provide us
with your horticultural secrets. How large is the tuber and how old
is it?

Having spent lots of time in Phoenix, I have often wondered how I would
grow tropical aroids if I lived there. Are you using swamp collers to
cool and humidify?

Don

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From: markdim at azstarnet.com (Mark A. Dimmitt) on 1997.09.07 at 08:22:58(1173)
Don Burns asked me to send a photo to someone with a scanner when my next
titanum leaf is unfurled. I'd be happy to. Any volunteers? A print, right?

He also asked for horticultural "secrets". There aren't any. My passion is
mainly for succulents and xerophytic epiphytes. I also have an incidental
interest in other weird plants such as the flashier aroids, about which I
know very little. The titanum seeds were from Palmengarten's index seminum
in June 1993. The three seeds began to germinate almost immediately, but it
took 18 months for the first leaf to unfurl completely. Since then they have
been growing exponentially, which is kind of scary, considering photos I've
seen of mature plants on the website (looks like about 15 feet?). I have
very little time to find space for the next explosion which began this week.

My greenhouse runs about 90 degrees F during the day (cooled by
evaporation), and 55 to 75 at night, winter and summer respectively. The two
remaining corms are in 24- and 36-inch pots in humus-rich potting mix. (I
gave the third to a friend in Calif., and it died outdoors in winter.) They
are fertilized with every watering at 200 ppm nitrogen. For the first two
growth cycles they made several leaves and split into two or three corms. I
gave two to the Biosphere; at least those should have enough room to mature.
Now they make a single leaf per growth cycle. I didn't dig 'em up the last
time they went dormant, so I don't know how large they are; the pots aren't
bulging yet.

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From: Don Burns <burns at mobot.org> on 1997.09.07 at 08:46:29(1178)
Mark, I'll be pleased to scan the photo for you. Sounds like yoy had
better get busy with your pick-axe. Either that, or move the plant soon
in an airconditioned trailer.

Julius, Mark could dig a far deeper hole than he would require and never
hit water. Arizona, unlike south Florida, is not known for its shallow
wells.

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From: MJ Hatfield <oneota at ames.net> on 1997.09.07 at 15:54:36(1180)
Mark said "For the first two
growth cycles they made several leaves and split into two or three
corms."
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From: "Julius Boos" <ju-bo at classic.msn.com> on 1997.09.07 at 17:57:36(1181)
----------
Sent: Sunday, September 07, 1997 11:46 AM
To: ju-bo@msn.com
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From: markdim at azstarnet.com (Mark A. Dimmitt) on 1997.09.08 at 06:18:13(1183)
>Mark said "For the first two
>growth cycles they made several leaves and split into two or three
>corms."
>Now I am confused! I thought that Wilbert stated in Aroideana #19
>concerning A. titanum..."no offset development.Leaf solitary."
>
>MJ Hatfield
>
>
I received the same response the first time I posted this info. I've
checked my plants' leaf characters with the literature, and I'm fairly
confident that they are titanum. I fertilize very heavily; this may have
stimulated abnormal proliferation when young. I have observed this
phenomenon in the genus Agave and others - in generous cultivated conditions
some "nonsuckering" agaves will occasionally produce offsets. You can check
my plants' ID when my photos get posted to the aroid website in a month or so.

Mark

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From: Wilbert Hetterscheid <hetter at vkc.nl> on 1997.09.08 at 06:47:08(1185)
Dear Mary Jane,

Splitting of a tuber isn't the same thing as producing offsets. Offsets
are subsidiary to the main tuber, whereas splitting dissolves the main
tuber!

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From: Dana Scholle <dana at homecom.com> on 1997.09.08 at 06:51:47(1186)
I have a scanner, I'd be happy to help.

At 10:22 AM 9/7/97 -0500, you wrote:
>Don Burns asked me to send a photo to someone with a scanner when my next
>titanum leaf is unfurled. I'd be happy to. Any volunteers? A print, right?
>
>He also asked for horticultural "secrets". There aren't any. My passion is
>mainly for succulents and xerophytic epiphytes. I also have an incidental
>interest in other weird plants such as the flashier aroids, about which I
>know very little. The titanum seeds were from Palmengarten's index seminum
>in June 1993. The three seeds began to germinate almost immediately, but it
>took 18 months for the first leaf to unfurl completely. Since then they have
>been growing exponentially, which is kind of scary, considering photos I've
>seen of mature plants on the website (looks like about 15 feet?). I have
>very little time to find space for the next explosion which began this week.
>
>My greenhouse runs about 90 degrees F during the day (cooled by
>evaporation), and 55 to 75 at night, winter and summer respectively. The two
>remaining corms are in 24- and 36-inch pots in humus-rich potting mix. (I
>gave the third to a friend in Calif., and it died outdoors in winter.) They
>are fertilized with every watering at 200 ppm nitrogen. For the first two
>growth cycles they made several leaves and split into two or three corms. I
>gave two to the Biosphere; at least those should have enough room to mature.
>Now they make a single leaf per growth cycle. I didn't dig 'em up the last
>time they went dormant, so I don't know how large they are; the pots aren't
>bulging yet.

+More
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