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  Advise in planting Arum seeds
From: "Tom Croat" <Thomas.Croat at mobot.org> on 2009.08.14 at 20:25:45(19721)
Dear Aroiders:

Ijust returned from a trip to the Balkans and collected an Arum in fruit in Durres, Albania. Since these berries were mature in the midst of their dry Mediterraneanstyle summer and if shed directly in such dry conditions could surely notgerminate I am assuming that they must somehow survive without germinatinguntil the rains begin. Does anyone know what I should do to get theseseeds to germinate? Do they need to be stored? Planteddirectly? Treated in any particular way? I would appreciate youhelp. Emily is coming in tomorrow to deal with them so if you have someadvise I would love to hear from you.

Thanks!

Tom

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From: Peter Boyce <phymatarum at googlemail.com> on 2009.08.14 at 22:28:05(19722)
HiTom,

Inthe Mediterranean the ripe fruits stay on the peduncle for a long time, and generallyare collected by thrushes or blackbirds (Turdus spp.) late in summer, as the autumn/winterrains begin. The seed passes through the bird, either via regurgitation orthrough faeces, but the important thing is that the red pericarp and pulpy mesocarpis removed

Thefruits should be cleaned of the pulp and sown on the surface of a mineral-soilrich mix and covered to ca. inch with small chippings (1/8-1/4 inch), ideallylimestone. Water them well and stand the pot someplace shady. Keep an eye onwater; don’t let them become totally dry, but equally overwatering isdetrimental. They will begin to germinate immediately they encounter moisturebut, depending on the species, will either produce an aerial shoot (eophyll)soon after germination (most), or will concentrate on root/tuber production andproduce an aerial shoot very early in the new year (maculatum, cylindraceum,orientale).

Verybest

Pete

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From: "Marek Argent" <abri1973 at wp.pl> on 2009.08.15 at 10:15:03(19731)
Hi Tom,

My Arum cylindraceum produces viable seeds every year, I sow them directly into the ground (sometimes in pots).

They germinate next spring after spending one winter in the garden. I live between zones 6/7.

http://www.wschowa.com/abrimaal/araceum/arum/alpinum.htm

I think the seeds should be sown as quickly as possible. Once I got seeds of various Arum species. They were dry and none of them germinated though I kept them for 2 days in water and all the winter they spent in pots a fridge.

Marek

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From: "Christopher Rogers" <crogers at ecoanalysts.com> on 2009.08.17 at 08:54:40(19735)
Greetings!

I grow many Arum species in the Great Central Valley of California. The Great Central Valley flora is nearly 70% non-native invasive plants, all from the Mediterranean or other Mediterranean climes. We have cool wet winters and dry hot summers. All my Arum species produce seed, and like Pete said, the fruits hang on for a long time. I have never seen any birds consume or collect the fruits (our scrub jays are collectors, hiding acorns and walnuts for later). If the fruit falls on the ground in summer where there is leaf litter, and afternoon and evening shade the it will germinate the following March, April or May. The native soils are clay loams with lots of alkali.

In pots I have also sown the fruits directly from the parent into loose, sandy soil (peat/sand/pumice) with lots of leaf litter or compost with the same result.

The species I have grown this way are:

A. dioscoridis dioscoridis

A. palestinum

A. palestinum (Mt. Carmel ecotype)

A. sintenesii

A. hygrophilum

A. italicum

A. cyrenaicum

I hope this helps,

Christopher

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From: "Tom Croat" <Thomas.Croat at mobot.org> on 2009.08.17 at 18:28:16(19741)
Dear Marek: Where do you live? Do youthink that these seeds would survive in St. Louis Missoui?

Thank you so much for your advise. Thiswill be my first experience with Arum seeds.

Tom

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From: Peter Boyce <phymatarum at googlemail.com> on 2009.08.18 at 23:07:03(19748)
Tom,

Didyou get my post on this?

Cheers

Pete

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From: "Marek Argent" <abri1973 at wp.pl> on 2009.08.19 at 11:43:45(19754)
Hi Tom,

I live in Europe, in Poland and I don't know the climate in USA.

It depends what species you have.

Once a few years we have cruel winters with night temperatures below -20C (-2F),

the last winter was very cold, but Arum cylindraceum (alpinum), A. italicum and A. italicum 'Pictum' survived,

the seedlings of A. cylindraceum survived too.

A few years ago here was a cold winter too and I lost A. concinnatum and one unidentified species.

http://www.wschowa.com/abrimaal/araceum/unid/arum2.htm

In the IAS page you can find a list of hardy aroids:

http://www.aroid.org/horticulture/hardy.php

Best,

Marek

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From: "Tom Croat" <Thomas.Croat at mobot.org> on 2009.08.20 at 10:42:56(19764)
Dear Marek: I am curious to know whatcity you live in. I have been in Wroclaw, Warsawa and Krakow. Once I wasthrown off the train in Bialstock when I came in from Russia and spent thenight drinking vodka and talking in German to a few railway workers whobefriended me (and while I waited for my passport to arrive from the border). At 3:00 AM the train came and I crawled my drunken body aboard an slept all theway to Warsawa.

Tom

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