Your search for articles published in volume 28 has found 25 articles.

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Year
Vol.
(Issue)
Pages
Author(s)
Title
2005
28
3-20
Josef Bogner, M. Hesse Zamioculcadoideae (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Remarkable and distinctive pollen characters support the separation of the tribe Zamioculcadeae as a group distinct from the aperigoniate Aroideae: Recently reported molecular data point in the same direction, and morphological and anatomical data likewise indicate a clear separation. Taken together, the evidence justifies the placement of at least the Zamioculcadeae in a new subfamily, Zamiocu1cadoideae. Zamioculcas and Gonatopus show greater pollen differences from the aperigoniate Aroideae than Stylochaeton, ,which seems to, represent an intermediate transition state. Nevertheless, Stylochaeton is closer palynologically and morphologically to the aperigoniate Aroideae.
2005
28
21-31
Eduardo G. Gonçalves A revision of genus Dracontioides Engl. (Araceae) (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: The genus Dracontioides was formerly considered monotypic with the only known species (D. desciscens (Schott) Eng!.) restricted to extreme eastern Brazil, growing as a helophytic herb. A second species for the genus (D. salvianii E.G. Gon~.) is here described, also from eastern Brazil (Bahia state). It is a psammophytic herb and a neotenic origin for this species is suggested. Since the last complete description of D. desciscens is the one included in the description of the genus, both species were described, illustrated and compared. Relationship of Dracontioides with genera considered closely related as Dracontium and Anapbyllopsis is discussed, as well as biogeographic and evolutionary trends within the genus Dracontioides and closely related genera.
2005
28
32-36
Eduardo G. Gonçalves Anaphyllopsis cururuana (Araceae) recollected in Brazil (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: The elusive Anaphyllopsis cururuana A. Hay was recollected for the first time since the type material. The original description was solely based in a fragmentary herbarium material, so a full description based on living plants, together with a new illustration, are both presented.
2005
28
37-42
A. Quilichini, Aurelia Torre, Marc Gibernau Preliminary data on the biology and reproduction of Ambrosina bassii L. (Araceae) in Corsica (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: This study explores the floral biology and reproduction mode of Ambrosina bassii L. that belongs to a monospecific genus of the subfamily Aroideae (Araceae). The species has a limited distribution and the number of mature plants within natural populations is low. Reproductive success of this species is limited due to low fructification and seed rates, however there is a positive relationship between the plant vigour and its investment to the reproduction. In stable habitats, there are more flowering plants than in newly colonized habitats, where the frequency of juvenile non-mature plants is higher. The knowledge of these biological and reproductive characters constitutes the first data useful for the preservation and the management of this rare, endangered and protected species on Corsica.
2005
28
43-48
Guy Gusman Arisaema scortechinii Hook. f. (Araceae) (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Following the study of a large population of A. scortechinii Hook. f. in Selangor, Malaysia, and on the basis of the examination of herbarium material, new information has been gathered and Hooker's description is completed. The presence .of bulbils on the peduncle is reported for the first time.
2005
28
49-51
Thomas B. Croat, J. Chaparra A new endemic species of Anthurium (Araceae) from Brazil
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 ABSTRACT: Anthurium curicuriariense Croat is described as new. The new species is a member of section Calomystrium, and is a narrow endemic known only from Cerro Curicuriari in northern Amazonas Department of Brazil near the Rio Negro.
2005
28
52-64
Thomas B. Croat, Rick Cirino A review of the Anthurium splendidum complex (Araceae) (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: A revision is made of five closely related species in Anthurium section Cardiolonchium from Western Colombia. Anthurium splendidum Hort. ex W. Bull is reported to be rediscovered, since in its original description in 1883 no known province was cited. One member of this complex, A. debilis Croat & Bay, was recently published. Three additional new species closely related to, or previously confused with A. splendidum, are described. These are A. giraldoi Croat, A. luxurians Croat & Cirino, and A. nutibarense Croat.
2005
28
65-68
Marcus A. Nadruz Coelho, Thomas B. Croat A new species of Anthurium from Brazil (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: A new species of Anthurium is described. The new species is Anthurium santaritensis Nadruz & Croat, belonging to section Pachyneurium. It is endemic to the Brazilian State of Minas Gerais, and is compared with Anthurium solitarium Schott.
2005
28
69-80
Thomas B. Croat, J. S. Lingán Chávez Rediscovery of rare species of Anthurium (Araceae) from Peru (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: In this paper five rare species of Anthurium are redescribed: A. consimile Schott, A. corallinum Poepp. et Endl., A. gracilipedunculatum Krause, A. huanucense Engler, and A. peltatum Poepp.
2005
28
81-85
J. Jacome, Thomas B. Croat Rediscovery of Anthurium gustavii Regel and Anthurium metallicum Linden ex Schott (Araceae) in Columbia (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Anthurium gustavii Regel and A. metallicum Linden ex Schott, both previously poorly known taxonomically and phytogeographically, are redescribed based on new information.
2005
28
86-87
Thomas B. Croat, G. C. Fernandez-Concha, L. I. Gonzalez Montrichardia arborescens (L.) Schott (Araceae) newly reported for Mexico
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 ABSTRACT: The genus Montrichardia, represented by M. arborescens is reported for the first time in Mexico.
2005
28
88-90
Julius O. Boos A new species of Xanthosoma (Araceae) for Trinidad
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 ABSTRACT: Xanthosoma aristeguietae (Bunting) Madison is described from Trinidad, W.I.
2005
28
91-100
Dorothy E. Shaw The stigma and style of Alocasia brisbanensis (F.M. Bailey) Domin (Araceae) (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: The stigmatic surface of each lobe of Alocasia brisbanensis consisted of a head of closely packed vertical papillae 160-220(- 250) f.Lm long by (9.5-)11.4(-13.3) f.Lm wide, some tapering to 3.8-5.7 f.Lm wide towards the base, each unicellular with a rounded tip. Deterioration and disorganization of stigmas occurred with deliquescence after about Day 7 from unfurling. The styles were short (0.2-)0.3(-0.4) mm long, with scattered idioblasts and raphide bundles in an outer zone encircling an inner solid core with some vascular elements. Stigmas pressed gently onto clean, dry, glass slides left an imprint consisting of minute amorphous particles, and the stigmas are therefore tentatively classed as wet Group III. Sampling of attached and detached inflorescences via a trapdoor cut into the spathal chambers, as well as through the spathal gaps (using Quantofix (R) Peroxide 25 test sticks) indicated receptivity of the stigmas during the bud stage and gaping of the spathal limb, and even after closure of the gap.
2005
28
101-103
Dorothy E. Shaw, L. H. Bird A note on the dimorphic pollen of variegated Alocasia brisbanensis (F.M. Bailey) Domin (Araceae)
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 ABSTRACT: Pollen from three variegated plants, two with overall purplish-brown coloration (haze) plus pattern from Ipswich, about 32 km in direct line west of Brisbane, and one with pattern only from Indooroopilly near Brisbane, was dimorphic. Pollen from two non-variegated plants from Indooroopilly was also dimorphic. The diameter range of normal grains with starch from the variegated and non-variegated plants was 32.3- 47.5 J.Lm with a mean of 40.5 J.Lm, whereas that of the aborted grains without starch was 19.0-36.1 J.Lm with a mean of 26.1 J.Lm. The amount of aborted grains, in a total of 2512 examined from the five specimens, was 5.1-9.8% with a mean of 7.1 %. After examination of the above results, it is suggested that the gene, or genes, for variegation is not genetically linked to the mechanism leading to abortion of some grains.
2005
28
104-112
C. Sathish Kumar, R. Kavalan Flowering phenology and beetle pollination in Theriophonum infaustum N.E. Br. (Araceae) (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Theriophonum infaustum N.E.Br. (Araceae), an endemic species of SW India, consists of small tuberous plants. The species was found to have protogynous inflorescences and to be visited by several kinds of beetles. Beetles belonging to the species Anotylus rubidus Cameron (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae) are found to be the main potential pollinators. Other species observed were only casual visitors. A detailed account on the process of cantharophily in this species is given with explanatory illustrations.
2005
28
113-129
F. Billiet The collections of Araceae at the National Botanic Garden of Belgium (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: The National Botanic Garden of Belgium is famous for its library, herbarium and living collections. The library is one of the major European botanical libraries, and the herbarium is one of the 25 largest herbaria of the world, with many specimens of Araceae including type material and historical specimens. The living collections contain about 18,000 plants of worldwide origin, of which 10,000 are greenhouse plants.
2005
28
130-133
F. Billiet Recent collections of Araceae at the National Botanic Garden of Belgium (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Recent collections of Araceae made in French Guiana since 1981 have been incorporated into the National Botanic Garden of Belgium herbarium (BR) and into the living collections. A detailed list of specimens is provided here. This list contains some recently described species: Philodendron hillietiae Croat, P. cremersii Croat & Grayum, Xanthosoma granvillei Croat & S. A. Thompson and Anthurium moonenii Croat.
2005
28
134-153
M. L. Soares, D. J. Jardim-Lima Amazonian species of Araceae in the INPA Herbarium (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: This study records the existing representation of Amazonian aroid species in the Herbarium of the National Institute for Amazonian Research at Manaus, Brazil. Label data was recorded with a view to plotting the distribution and density of collections, as well as the taxonomic diversity of genera and species. For the Amazonian states of Brazil , the INPA herbarium contains 23 genera , 148 species, two subspecies and 14 varieties of Araceae.
2005
28
154-165
M. A. Pérez-Farrera Araceae of Chiapas State (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: A comparative analysis of richness patterns by physiographic regions and a list of Araceae of Chiapas is presented based on a 6-year field study and a review of herbarium material. Eleven genera and seventy-nine species of Araceae were recorded for Chiapas, of which fifteen species are endemic to Chiapas. The genera Anthurium and Philodendron were the major components in the family. The Sierra Madre de Chiapas, the Northern Highlands and the Eastern Highlands were the richest regions for Araceae with 53, 44 and 36 species respectively with the richness apparently correlated with the broad range of elevation and climate exhibited in these regions. The Pacific and Gulf Coastal Plains as well as the Central Depression of Chiapas are regions which are less diverse with 18, 3 and 15 species respectively. Using Jaccard's Index, the Northern Highland and Eastern Highland region were found to be more similar (0.54) while Gulf Coastal Plain, Sierra Madre and Central Plateau were regions less similar in species composition (0.05).
2005
28
166-173
Vicent Lebot Taro (Colocasia esculenta) genetic improvement: A need for international collaboration (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: There is a strong desire to safeguard taro (Colocasia esculenta) continued production by breeding for improved production. The two major constraints to the development of taro cultivation, processing and value-adding are: its insufficient adaptation to the changing climate (especially its limited adaptation to drought) and its chemotype (low dry matter, starch and amylose contents and high oxalate content). Both can be genetically improved. The chances of getting a high yielding clone, with excellent eating quality, are generally very low and they become much lower when the selection procedure includes additional traits. Therefore breeders have to test a lot of offspring individuals, even when the parents are the best existing genotypes. The sustainable and safe use of taro germplasm cannot be addressed if only one gene pool is studied. There is an urgent need to exchange genetic resources. This makes sense both in scientific terms and in terms of technical co-operation between developing countries. The present paper highlights some of the present constraints to taro genetic improvement and discuss future perspectives opened by the international exchange of true seeds.
2005
28
174-190
R. S. Misra, M. Nedunchezhiyan, G. Suja Commercially cultivated edible aroids in India (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Members of the aroid family are important food sources in all parts of the tropics and subtropics, with the potential to increase production to even greater levels. The genera of greatest importance are Colocasia, Xanthosoma, Amorphophallus, Alocasia and Cyrtosperma. These genera .are described, together with the situation regarding their cultivation and use in the Indian subcontinent.
2005
28
191-196
Chunlin Long, Heng Li, W. Chen Amorphophallus in China: How many? (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: The species diversity of Amorphophallus in China was studied and revised in the present paper. Twenty-five years after the publication of the Araceae in Flora Reipublicae Popularis Sinicae, the species number of Amorphophallus has been increased from 6 to 23. Among these 23 known species, 11 are endemic to China and 12 are edible. The distribution of Amorpbopballus is uneven in China, with Yunnan the richest province in species diversity of the genus.
2005
28
197-200
S. Bartlett Titan Arum - Big AL from Sydney (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: On Wednesday the 6th of October 2004 the Royal Botanic Gardens Sydney flowered their first Titan Arum, Amorphphophallus Titanum, only the second flowering in Australia behind Cairns in 2003. In the following paragraphs is a brief discussion of the Sydney Gardens history cultivating the Titan, techniques and growing conditions that finally led to our magnificent flowering.
2005
28
201-202
John Banta A new resource for IAS Members
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 ABSTRACT: Four large binders contain well-annotated documentation of 111 species of Amorphophallus. Additional binders contain information regarding horticultural references, area species lists, species locations in private collections, as well as photographs, letters, newspaper clippings and other relevant materials.
2005
28
Inside back cover
Dorothy E. Shaw An amendment and an erratum
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