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  Anthurium ID
From: harrywitmore at witmore.net (Harry Witmore) on 2008.06.01 at 10:12:05(17653)
A friend collected some seed from this Anthurium while in Cancun. I suspect
it was just planted in the garden as he said there were many around the
grounds at the hotel. They have sprouted and he is looking for an ID. Ideas?

HYPERLINK
"http://www.cloudjungle.com/CloudJungle/Araceae/Anthurium/Anthurium-unk.jpg"
http://www.cloudjungle.com/CloudJungle/Araceae/Anthurium/Anthurium-unk.jpg

Harry Witmore

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From: LLmen at wi.rr.com (Don Martinson) on 2008.06.01 at 11:56:17(17659)
Did your friend say what colors the ?berries? were which enclosed the seed?
All I could say is that is looks like one of the birdsnest types to me.

Don Martinson

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From: mnadruz at jbrj.gov.br (Marcus Nadruz) on 2008.06.01 at 15:31:23(17662)
Harry,

Maybe A. hookeri.

Marcus A. Nadruz Coelho

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From: Steve at ExoticRainforest.com (ExoticRainforest) on 2008.06.01 at 23:40:26(17671)
Harry, they are difficult to discern clearly but in PhotoShop the veins of you specimen do look somewhat scaliform or ladder like. Read the material Tom provided about Anthurium hookeri here and comare it to your plant:
http://www.exoticrainforest.com/Anthurium%20hookeri%20pc.html

If it produced berries and the species is A. hookeri they will be white, not red.

Steve Lucas

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From: edleigh7 at optusnet.com.au (edleigh) on 2008.06.02 at 00:28:15(17672)
Harry,

Could be A schlechtendalii, but the leaves look a bit more ruffled than mine. Spadix and berries also look similiar.

Regards,

Ed & Leigh

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From: harrywitmore at witmore.net (Harry Witmore) on 2008.06.02 at 04:30:21(17674)
The berries are red so I think that eliminates A hookeri. It's really hard
to tell with the amount of information one can get from these picture.

Harry Witmore

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From: Thomas.Croat at mobot.org (Tom Croat) on 2008.06.02 at 09:08:46(17680)
Dear Harry:

This is Anthurium schlechtendalii Kunth.

Tom

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From: Thomas.Croat at mobot.org (Tom Croat) on 2008.06.02 at 13:48:01(17687)
Harry: Anthurium schlechtendalii is immensely variable even in the same
population.

Tom

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From: harrywitmore at witmore.net (Harry Witmore) on 2008.06.02 at 14:13:59(17689)
Thanks Tom, I was thinking it could be but it looks very different from
mine. It does have red berries and the inflorescence looks correct.

Harry Witmore

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From: ju-bo at msn.com (ju-bo at msn.com) on 2008.06.02 at 19:44:31(17700)
________________________________
> From: harrywitmore at witmore.net
> To: aroid-l at gizmoworks.com
> Date: Mon, 2 Jun 2008 17:13:59 -0400
> Subject: Re: [Aroid-l] Anthurium ID

Dear Friends,

Just a note about this plant which might assist, it is available commercially, and I just noticed that at the holding area of the Company where I work (we do commercial landscaping installs) we presently have a couple dozen potted specimens of plants exactly like these purchased from a commercial grower, I`ll ask where and what they were called. Anthurium ''ruffles'' comes to mind, but that name probably has no horticultural value.

Julius

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From: harrywitmore at witmore.net (Harry Witmore) on 2008.06.03 at 03:47:55(17713)
I was thinking that Anthurium 'Ruffles' was a hookeri cultivar but I
definitely could be wrong.

Harry Witmore

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From: Steve at ExoticRainforest.com (ExoticRainforest) on 2008.06.03 at 13:05:44(17717)
Harry, I think Anthurium 'Ruffles' is an A. plowmanii.

Steve Lucas

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From: brian lee <lbmkjm at yahoo.com> on 2008.09.10 at 09:36:21(18491)
Dear Harry,

Surf on to the classic Tropicos3 and search Anthurium giganteum, images. There are several variations on this theme. I have a form that looks similar,but has narrower sinuses...I have been looking at photos of plants in habitat and there seems to be a species complex associated with populations of closely related taxa.

Does your plant set seed? I have not been able to set seeds on this and some other large growing species...but, I have only recently been interested in pollination of my Anthurium. I need to learn techniques and timing...I am trying only to self...not hybridize, at this point.

I'd be interested in your opinion after you check out the Tropicos images and the comparison to your plant.

Aloha,

Leland

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From: "Harry Witmore" <harrywitmore at witmore.net> on 2008.09.12 at 05:28:16(18506)
Leland, thanks for the suggestion. My sense is that it is not Anthurium
giganteum. Comparing my plant to it's description and pictures I have seen,
they are not a match for this Anthurium. It has also been suggested to me
that mine could be Anthurium balaoanum. I looked this up and found Steve's
page on this species and this really matches my plant completely. Like
Steve, mine has never produced and inflorescence so I cannot compare this to
the description. My plant does not look match A cordatum either. I don’t
have any collection info on this plant since I just received it as an
unlabeled cutting years ago from Brian Williams.

I think I will tag it for now as Anthurium aff balaoanum. Whatever it is,
it's a nice Anthurium. Thanks all for the suggestions

Harry Witmore

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From: brian lee <lbmkjm at yahoo.com> on 2008.09.12 at 09:58:48(18511)
Dear Harry,

Aloha.

Thank you for your inquiry. I have a large growing plant which is similar to Anthurium giganteum in general...but with a narrower sinus, etc. I may also have an Anthurium balaoanum. My collective vein starts at about the 4-7 basal vein...I could not see yours. I read Steve's article on Anthurium balaoanum and it seems to match my plant somewhat. I will also assign a tentative identification. It is difficult these similar species...from photos and plants without data. My plant was purchased as a cutting and was sold to me as Anthurium regale...which it is not. Two other cuttings, also sold as Anthurium regale,are some other species which I have not identified. No data...and I have no clue yet. The only common denominator in all these is their large size.

Aloha,

Leland

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From: brian lee <lbmkjm at yahoo.com> on 2008.09.12 at 10:10:33(18512)
Dear Harry,

Aloha.

I am answering myself a bit. I just read a little further down on Steve Lucas' article on Anthurium balaoanum where the spadix is described as maroon turning to brown...my spadix is a yellow green...if my memory is serves me correctly. The inflorescence is held erect.

Aloha,

Leland

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From: "ExoticRainforest" <Steve at ExoticRainforest.com> on 2008.09.12 at 14:03:17(18517)

Leland, can you possibly post a photo of your inflorescence? I took the description of the inflorescence from Dr. Croat's field notes and have not seen an inflorescence on any of my four plants.

Thanks!

Steve Lucas

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From: brian lee <lbmkjm at yahoo.com> on 2008.09.13 at 09:17:00(18528)
Dear Steve,

Aloha.

My plant is past blooming this year, I believe...but I will do so. I think my plant must be something other than Anthurium balaoanum, if Dr. Croat's notes on the spadix are correct and diagnostic.

Aloha,

Leland

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From: "ExoticRainforest" <Steve at ExoticRainforest.com> on 2008.09.13 at 15:31:36(18531)
Leland, your knowledge of aroids far outweighs my own but I thought everyone who is an Anthurium enthusiast might like to read some of Tom's notes taken from TROPICOS. Perhaps you can compare these to your plant and determine if your specimen is truly Anthurium balaoanum. For those unfamiliar, the numbers at the beginning are Dr. Croat's specimen numbers. Tom once explained in a series of personal emails that many people believe Anthurium balaoanum is Anthurium guildingii. A. balaoanum is from Ecuador and Anthurium guildingii is from the lower eastern Caribbean and as you know both plants are very different.

If your plant is Anthurium balaoanum I'd love to have a photo of the plant as well as the spathe to add to my webpage http://www.exoticrainforest.com/Anthurium%20balaoanum%20pc.html

Steve

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From: brian lee <lbmkjm at yahoo.com> on 2008.09.14 at 12:12:03(18538)
Dear Steve,

Aloha.

What would be important...and I am going to let you do the initial investigation...can you tie the collection numbers to locality data? Just from reading the field notes...either Anthurium balaonum is a plastic, variable species...specifically the petioles and spadix color, etc. are different in the specimens listed. My plant has characters that fit several of the notes,and not others. My petioles are subterete and weakly sulcate on the adaxial surface. My spadix, if memory is serving me, was yellow-green...not maroon at male anthesis...which the first specimen(#53706) is described as having...since the pollen is noted in this field observation. When my plant next blooms, I will pay closer attention to details...as I really have only taken passing notice until this species became a subject of discussion.

Please connect the locality data to the numbers and whatever other details you can ferret out.

Aloha,

Leland

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From: Skip Hanson <shanson at emc.com> on 2008.09.15 at 10:23:00(18541)
All,

Good morning, this Anthurium looks just like the one I posted on the NAS ID center a couple months ago.

http://www.wschowa.com/abrimaal/araceum/unid/anthskip.htm

I included two shots of the spathe. My leaf shot is of a new leaf. Since then I have several new leafs, but sadly no

new spathes. I would be happy to provide additional pictures of my plants for anyone to use. Just let me know where

to send them.

Cheers,

Skip

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From: "Tom Croat" <Thomas.Croat at mobot.org> on 2008.09.15 at 11:17:25(18543)
Dear Steve:

While I still consider A. balaoanum a distinct species it may prove to be merely an ecotype of A. dolichostachyum. I know it only from the drier parts of Ecuador and it is a much smaller plant with longer, more slender internodes and thinner leaves as well as a smaller, thinner spadix with a very ephemeral spathe. However, no feature is qualatively different from A. dolichostachyum so perhaps the latter species simply has a wide ecological and altitudinal range.

Tom

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From: "ExoticRainforest" <Steve at ExoticRainforest.com> on 2008.09.16 at 05:14:51(18544)
Will do. I am printing your note to take with me to Miami to discuss with Dr. Croat as well.

I hope a bunch of you will be in Miami! We leave tonight.

Steve Lucas

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From: "ExoticRainforest" <Steve at exoticrainforest.com> on 2008.09.16 at 05:21:01(18545)
Thankd Tom. We had discussed this briefly in your office two years ago. I have printed off the information I have published as well as this note along with Leland's to bring to Miami. Hopefully we can find time to sit and allow you to explain all this in more detail so I can clarify the information on my site.

Glad you're back for Europe and I'll see you in just a few days.

Steve

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From: Don Martinson <llmen at wi.rr.com> on 2010.05.03 at 07:16:37(21003)
This one surely looks like Anth. crystallinum or A. clarinervium or maybe
even A. magnificum, but I am not expert enough to tell the difference.

On 4/30/10 6:10 PM, "Marek Argent" wrote:

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From: "John" <criswick at spiceisle.com> on 2010.05.04 at 05:32:10(21014)
At a guess I would go for A. crystallinum. A. magnificum has somewhat more
cordate lvs., not quite as long as these in proportion to width, as far as I
remember, but can easily be distinguished by the fact that the petioles have
a square section, as opposed to round in A. crystallinum.

A. clarinervum is much smaller, with lvs. almost wider than long. More
ears than body, like an alien.

John.

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From: "John" <criswick at spiceisle.com> on 2010.05.04 at 05:32:10(21015)
At a guess I would go
for A. crystallinum. A. magnificum has somewhat more cordate lvs., not
quite as long as these in proportion to width, as far as I remember, but can easily
be distinguished by the fact that the petioles have a square section, as
opposed to round in A. crystallinum.

A. clarinervum is much smaller, with lvs. almost wider than long.
More ears than body, like an alien.

John.

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From: Zach DuFran <zdufran at wdtinc.com> on 2010.05.04 at 05:34:18(21016)
That one is A. clarinervium

Zach

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From: Zach DuFran <zdufran at wdtinc.com> on 2010.05.04 at 05:34:18(21017)
That one is A. clarinervium

Zach

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From: Zach DuFran <zdufran at wdtinc.com> on 2010.05.04 at 07:46:13(21018)
I stand corrected. :)

Zach

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From: Zach DuFran <zdufran at wdtinc.com> on 2010.05.04 at 07:46:13(21019)
I stand corrected. :)

Zach

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From: Helmut Reisenberger <gartenbaureisenberger at web.de> on 2010.05.05 at 13:37:53(21032)
_______________________________________________
Aroid-L mailing list
Aroid-L@www.gizmoworks.com
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From: Helmut Reisenberger <gartenbaureisenberger at web.de> on 2010.05.05 at 13:37:53(21033)
This is A. clarinervium. Rhe leaves can become 35 cm long!

Helmut reisenberger


Von: Zach DuFran
Gesendet: 04.05.2010 14:34:18
An: Discussion of aroids
Betreff: Re: [Aroid-l] Anthurium ID


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From: "John" <criswick at spiceisle.com> on 2010.05.07 at 06:54:33(21038)
Everybody is saying that the plant in the picture is A. clarinervium but
attached, 1892, is the plant I have always known as A. clarinervium. These
leaves are 15 cm. long and I don't doubt they can get much bigger under
optimum conditions, but in comparison with A. crystallinum and A. magnificum
the plant is a dwarf. It produces orange fruits.

Incidentally there is another plant introduced into the trade through tissue
culture as Anthurium 'Crystal Hope' which may be a mutation of A.
crystallinum. The leaves on this specimen are 23 cm. long. See 1890.

John.

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From: "John" <criswick at spiceisle.com> on 2010.05.07 at 06:54:33(21039)

Everybody is saying
that the plant in the picture is A. clarinervium but attached, 1892, is the
plant I have always known as A. clarinervium. These leaves are 15 cm. long and
I don’t doubt they can get much bigger under optimum conditions, but in
comparison with A. crystallinum and A. magnificum the plant is a dwarf. It
produces orange fruits.

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From: Jay Vannini <heloderma5 at hotmail.com> on 2010.05.10 at 08:49:37(21048)
John:

#1892 is what many in the trade call crystallinum...many of these are in fa
ct primary hybrids. I grow a number of 'Crystal Hope' and it appears to me
to be a complex hybrid involving crystallinum. Very compact rather touch
y in cultivation and the contrast light color bleeding off the main veins i
s quite distinctive and may suffuse almost the entire interveinal tisue. It
also appears to have suffered some sort of mutation in TC that makes it cl
ump early on and like some other plants suffering from this same problem
it is rather difficult to train them to a single lead. I have found tha
t if you can get a single good-sized stem going they will then exhibit r
easonably normal growth.

Jay

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From: Jay Vannini <heloderma5 at hotmail.com> on 2010.05.10 at 08:49:37(21049)
John:
 
#1892 is what many in the trade call crystallinum...many of these are in fact primary hybrids. I grow a number of 'Crystal Hope' and it appears to me to be a complex hybrid involving crystallinum. Very compact, rather touchy in cultivation and the contrast light color bleeding off the main veins is quite distinctive and may suffuse almost the entire interveinal tisue. It also appears to have suffered some sort of mutation in TC that makes it clump early on and, like some other plants suffering from this same problem, it is rather difficult to train them to a single lead. I have found that if you can get a single good-sized stem going, they will then exhibit reasonably normal growth.
 
Jay
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From: <ju-bo at msn.com> on 2010.05.10 at 14:31:46(21051)
Dear John

I am just too weak to go searching. Maybe some other aroid member (Steve??
) can look in the early issues of Aroideana as there are a couple of pap
ers explaining the parentage to the Anthuriums in your photos one by Joh
n Banta.

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From: "Marek Argent" <abri1973 at wp.pl> on 2010.05.10 at 17:26:11(21052)
Dear John,

This larger plant (DSCF1890) may be A. leuconeurum or A. magnificum.
Both grow very big.
http://www.wschowa.com/abrimaal/araceum/anthurium/leuconeurum.htm

Marek

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From: "Marek Argent" <abri1973 at wp.pl> on 2010.05.10 at 17:26:11(21053)
Dear John,

This larger plant (DSCF1890) may be A. leuconeurum or A. magnificum. Both grow very big.

http://www.wschowa.com/abrimaal/araceum/anthurium/leuconeurum.htm

Marek

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From: "John" <criswick at spiceisle.com> on 2010.05.12 at 05:30:52(21061)
Jay,

Thanks for these
observations. The trade may well call 1892 crystallinum, but what do they
know? Thanks to Steve and Mike Madison we now know that it is A. leuconeurum,
syn. A. clarinervium.

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From: "John" <criswick at spiceisle.com> on 2010.05.12 at 05:38:34(21062)
Dear Julius,

Thanks
for making so much effort to reply to my enquiry. As you may have seen
just now, Mike Madison and John Banta, through Steve, have enlightened us and
what we have been calling A. clarinervium; the dwarf plant with very cordate
leaves and orange berries, is properly named A. leuconeurum.

Wishing
you all the best in your struggle, Julius,

John.

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From: "John" <criswick at spiceisle.com> on 2010.05.12 at 05:47:53(21063)
Dear Marek,

This is very
interesting, not to mention confusing. I have to admit that the picture of A.
leuconeurum in Mike Madison’s article did not look like A. clarinervium
to me, but I put it down to variation. Now you have presented us with a South
American, non-Mexican sp. and I couldn’t agree with you more that it’s
not the same thing we are both, apparently, growing commercially as A.
clarinervium.

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From: "John" <criswick at spiceisle.com> on 2010.05.14 at 04:42:48(21067)
Great to know that
finally you felt good enough to do a search, Julius. I have read the Banta
article which Steve has posted and will nudge him about the Croat article.

John.

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From: ExoticRainforest <Steve at ExoticRainforest.com> on 2010.05.16 at 12:28:34(21071)
For those that would like to read it, here is Dr. Croat's article
from Aroideana Volume 6, number four on Anthurium leuconeurum.
Like many short articles this one can be downloaded for free from
www.Aroid.org. Just do a search on the search engine on the lower left
of the homepage. There is a slight charge for larger articles.

Aroideana is an extremely valuable source of good information for any
grower. If you are an IAS member you will receive a copy of the annual
issue every summer. Those of us that enjoy knowing the facts about our
plants often cherish the library of issues we have managed to acquire
but even if you don't have all of them in print you can still read them
on the IAS site. If you haven't joined yet, I promise you will get
your money's worth!

Steve

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From: "Marek Argent" <abri1973 at wp.pl> on 2010.05.16 at 13:31:47(21072)
Dear Friends,

The order was a little different:

1. I asked for the ID of this one http://aroid.org/midamerica/201004images/032.jpg

2. John sent 2 photos of his unidentified white-veined Anthuriums

3. I replied that one of them can be A. leuconeurum http://www.wschowa.com/abrimaal/araceum/anthurium/leuconeurum.htm

Later there was a discussion on fruits color, I asked privately the owner of this plant,

he said that:

The fruits of the species turn pale yellow when ripe. I successfully have grown some plants in generative propagation.
Returning to John Criswck's plants I'll try to post the photos today in the ID center.

Best,

Marek

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From: "Marek Argent" <abri1973 at wp.pl> on 2010.05.16 at 14:49:08(21073)
Ok, it's done.

I posted all the 3 photos in the ID Center:

http://www.wschowa.com/abrimaal/araceum/unid/anthcriswick1.htm

http://www.wschowa.com/abrimaal/araceum/unid/anthcriswick2.htm

http://www.wschowa.com/abrimaal/araceum/unid/anthzach1.htm

or simply:

http://www.wschowa.com/abrimaal/araceum/unid/id.htm#anthurium

When anyone replies from these pages, the following persons will be informed:

Steve Lucas, John Criswick, Zach du Fran and me.

If you want to be added to the list, please mail to araceum@wp.pl

I hope it will be helpful

Marek Argent

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From: ExoticRainforest <Steve at ExoticRainforest.com> on 2010.05.17 at 03:54:02(21077)
Marek, href="http://www.wschowa.com/abrimaal/araceum/unid/anthzach1.htm">http://www.wschowa.com/abrimaal/araceum/unid/anthzach1.htm
was identified by Dr. Croat as Anthurium crystallinum.

Steve

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From: "Marek Argent" <abri1973 at wp.pl> on 2011.05.15 at 15:39:15(22060)

Dear Friends,

Can you identify this gorgeous specimen? I got these photos and I have no idea, maybe it is a hybrid.

Best,

Marek

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From: "Denis" <denis at skg.com> on 2011.05.19 at 05:11:55(22061)

The plant in the picture is anthurium x Marie. It was breed by Steve Nock In Miami FL. He put it into tissue culture a few years ago and I have been growing it at my nursery ever since. It is very variable from tissue culture and this is the wider leave form of it. It is a very good landscape plant because it can take bright light and also deep shade. In bright light it gets a reddish purple tint to the green leaves but in deep shade it is all green. It is not a large grower and stays medium size. I hope this helps.

Bill Rotolante

Silver Krome Gardens Inc.

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From: brian lee <lbmkjm at yahoo.com> on 2011.05.19 at 08:06:28(22062)

Dear Marek and Gary,

Aloha.

Anthurium 'Marie', hybridized by Steve and Marie Nock and named for Marie. Google and Google image that and see if it matches.

Aloha,

Leland

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